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Setting up a hydraulic sander?

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Long Island Brian, Dec 18, 2000.

  1. Long Island Brian

    Long Island Brian Junior Member
    Messages: 17

    Still no snow here on Long Island, but uit is good in a way, because my stuff still isn't ready. I am currently hooking up an airflow 6 yard hydraulic sander to a chevey c-60 dump truck. I am going to put a diverter on the hydraulic pump to get the sander to work is this ok to do or what would be the alternative and cost?
    Thanks,
    Brian
     
  2. GeoffD

    GeoffD PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,266

    It would be ok to install a diverter valve as long as the hydro pump puts out enough GPM.

    Otherwise you will need a new hydro pump with higher GPMs.

    Geoff
     
  3. Long Island Brian

    Long Island Brian Junior Member
    Messages: 17

    Geoff,
    How do you know if there is enough GPM's to operate the sander? Is there a way to test it? How much GPM's are needed? Also is it ok to drive with a setup like this one? Keep in mind it is an airflow (7 yards).
    Thanks for the advice,
    Brian
     
  4. GeoffD

    GeoffD PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 2,266

    I am not sure how many GPM are reguired to run your sander.

    I am asuming that your dump body pump runs off a pto pump. Some trucks pto's opperate different than others. Some trucks you can't drive and run the pto at the same time, other trucks you can.

    You best bet, I probably to find out the reguired GPMs for the sander, and buy an engine driven pump that can produce the correct GPMs. Then your left with the fun part connecting a whole mess of hose and valves and fitting together.

    Or if ya got plenty of money, go down to your local truck shop, and they will find a way to run your spreader. I am not sure how much it will cost, might not be too bad, than again it could be.

    Geoff
     
  5. plowking35

    plowking35 2000 Club Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 2,923

    Contact airflow and they should give you the specs on hydro needs. Then look on your pump and that should tell you how gpm your pto is putting out,then call that manufacturer and see if you can run the pto while driving.
    Dino
     
  6. SLSNursery

    SLSNursery PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 140

    What type of PTO

    On our F-800 we have a muncie PTO with dual belts mounted right to the engine, and I am wondering the same thing. Last week we put a Swenson 7yd on the truck, but it has a pony motor. I was hoping to put a diverter valve as well and have a backup Hydro supply. I have the book, and now you have started me thinking.

    What kind of PTO do you have? What size hose, resevoir, etc. I think all these things factor in.

    Geoff - does your 650 have an outfront PTO right off of the crank? I was thinking of this set up for a single axle, but not sure what the benefits are.
     
  7. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    I don't know about Airflo, but my Frink undertailgate spreader needs something like 14 GPM to run both auger and spinner at the higher delivery rates. Lots of dump hoist pumps max out at 8-10 GPM and they have to be would up to make that. Some of the systems with the pump in the tank are either 4 or 8 GPM and limited to 1,000 RPM.

    My personal choice is the belt drive pumps with electric clutch. Those make 20 GPM at 2,000 RPM (round numbers) and handle a spreader easily. My current central system uses a power beyond valve for hoist and plow. When you engage the hoist valve the spreader stops temporarily. If I was going to do it again I'd put a flow divider in ahead of the valve body and send constant flow to the spreader. That way the excess flow runs the hoist and the spreader speed is constant, regardless of pump output. But that means 3 more hoses inside the cab, which I wanted to avoid. If I put the flow divider outside the cab it would get all messed up from salt splash.

    Current system has the clutch pump, 20 gallon tank, total system capacity is near 25 gallons. Valve bank is under the body with cables from the control handles in the cab. I had to run lines into the cab, for the spreader control, but I mounted the control on pedestal on 5" exhaust pipe and left the hole in the floor open where the lines come up inside the pedestal. At least now if I get a leak it will be contained inside the pedestal and drain back out rather than soaking the interior with oil.