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Sending unit Fuel pump

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by RichG53, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. RichG53

    RichG53 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,135

    Are the fuel gauge sending unit and fuel pump separate or a combined units ???
    Thanks !!!
     
  2. Assuming it is the truck in your sig. Yes it is a complete module. Sending unit and pump all in one. Replace your fuel filter too.
     
  3. 70monte

    70monte Senior Member
    Messages: 468

    How about a 98 K1500? My fuel gauge quit working after the truck sat for quite awhile without it being driven. The gauge mostly reads from 3/4 tank to a full tank and occasionally it drops all the way to empty before going back up.

    Wayne
     
  4. APLC

    APLC Senior Member
    Messages: 206

    yep sounds like a sending unit when u get issues with your fuel gauge. Yeah i believe on most mid 90's Chevy trucks the sending unit and fuel pump are all in one, dont go with a cheap replacement had to learn that a few times good luck should be an easy fix though
     
  5. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

  6. 70monte

    70monte Senior Member
    Messages: 468

    My pump is not very new as it has about 77,000 miles on it. Its an AC-Delco replacement that I replaced quite a few years ago. Its probably not worth just replacing the sending unit with the mileage I have on mine.

    Wayne
     
  7. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Total waste of time and effort to change only the sender or only the pump while they're both removed from the tank on anything pre-'03 GM with the problematic history record they both have on todays gasoline.

    Change them both to a current design as they'll be content on todays alcohol impregnated gasoline causing those issues to become null and void.
     
  8. RobMI

    RobMI Member
    Messages: 30

    Make sure to check the 4pin square connector at the sending unit. These are very prone to fail, napa includes a new connector with pigtail with some of the pump/sending unit combos now. If not included it is available separately. I replace these connectors due to pin burn out at the shop all the time.
     
  9. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Standard procedure during a pump or sender change on a GM. :nod:
     
  10. 70monte

    70monte Senior Member
    Messages: 468

    What do you mean change them to the current design. Are the new Delco replacements for my year truck a current design or do I have to specify a different year pump that will work.? thanks.

    Wayne
     
  11. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    No just a currently manufactured pump for whatever the application is. After E10 became prevalent manufactures began updating replacement fuel system components across the board (mostly for older vehicles) so the replacement parts would be fully ethanol compatible.
     
  12. mkwl

    mkwl 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,361

    What's the process/costs for changing out the fuel pump? Hopefully I don't need to do one anytime soon, but I'd just like to know.
     
  13. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Lift the bed off, disconnect the lines, unplug the wire connector and pull the pump assembly up out of the tank. I have them to under an hour start to finish.
     
  14. A good aftermarket pump will cost around $300.00 (give or take a hundred), while a GM pump run around $500-$600. Stay away from off brand pumps, go to the dealer and buy a Delco pump or buy a Delphi from a local parts store. This is a part that WILL leave you stuck.
     
  15. sopping up all the gravypayup lol
     
  16. mkwl

    mkwl 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,361

    Yikes- pulling off the bed? It's not easier to drop the tank? How does one go about pulling the bed?
     
  17. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    It's easier than it sounds. 8 bolts hold the bed down. Three screws on the filler neck. You can actually jack up just the drivers side up a foot or two if you want. Don't take the pass side bolts all the way out.

    You will get the time back easy. Especially if the tank is full. And the tank is always full when the pump dies. Plus you don't have to deal with rusty bolts on the tank straps.
     
  18. I'm currently suffering this same problem. Take the box off? Sounds reasonable. But if the tank straps are that bad, might as well replace that too while being that committed to the repair.
     
  19. jblatti13

    jblatti13 Senior Member
    Messages: 123

    i just had to do all of this last week on my 90 1500.... taking the bed off is definitely the way to go... i had to replace rear fuel lines, sending unit and pump, and ended up getting a new tank as well... the beds held down by 8 bolts, the rear 2 youll have to remove the bolts for the hitch mount to get to the bed bolts... get the bed off and everything is right there and wide open for you to get to. sending unit was about 150 fuel lines 160 tank 125 and pump was about 85... definitely buy ac or delphi pump, not worth it using aftermarket there... the sending unit i believe was dorman.. they make most of the lines and stuff for these trucks, cheapest i found was at oreailly's ( murrays auto parts) if you have one near by. good luck with it, not too bad of a job.
     
  20. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    Those way back bed bolts should come off with a ratchet, rather than pulling the hitch bolts.