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sand bridging

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by boba, Mar 27, 2002.

  1. boba

    boba Senior Member
    Messages: 110

    I checked old threads and still have some questions. I have a 1.8 yd fisher sander,new this year. It is a real pain. Fill it at night or the morning sand still bridges. I drive 5 miles over bumpy country roads before I start sanding. Would installing the inverted V help? Any other suggestions?
     
  2. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    Quality of the mix is a major consideration. Other than that an inverted V may help as well as adding a vibrator to the hopper.

    I used to have the same problem when I bought sand. It seemed that because it was fine that it would bridge. Now I stockpile mine own and get a slightly coarser grade. Never have a problem with bridging.
     
  3. SLC1

    SLC1 Senior Member
    Messages: 242

    CT. is right about the mix, the more salt that you use in it, it will work better, we have two small sanders one has the inverted V and one doesnt, but they will both bridge with sand the same if it is a bad mix. This fall one of my friends owed me money so we traded and he gave me two tri-axle loads of sand(he owns a gravel pit) to pay off his debt, the sand was so terrible that after going through the first load , I started giving the second load away to a couple local small plowers just to get rid of it, (sometimes free isnt always cheap) so I went back to my old supplier and now mix it very hot and never have any problems. Just my two cents
     
  4. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    I sub to a town highway and we had a problem with bridging when the gravel bank got in to a batch of fine sand. It seems that the finer the sand, the worse the bridging problem, as observed by CTfireman.
     
  5. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Two solutions - mix sand/salt at about 90/10 or
    sand coated with Magic -0. For me, mixing sand with Magic is actually cheaper than buying sand/salt mix. Now I need a front end loader.
     
  6. paul soccodato

    paul soccodato Senior Member
    Messages: 430

    hey mick, isnt it funny how you always need something else!
     
  7. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    Mick, 110 TLB
     
  8. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    After re reading this thread, another thought came to mind; don't pre-load your truck unless you have a heated area to park it. Freezing temperatures will contribute to bridging.
     
  9. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Unfortunately, the accountant (wife) says it's time to stop spending and make money for awhile. Where's the fun in that?

    I am looking into putting a wing on the 3500 for a couple of roads I have. Found a wing today called Birco. They look good and are made about ten miles from me. Anybody every heard or used a Birco Plow Wing?

    Alan, I'd still like to get that 110 TLB. I just haven't figured out how I can justify $40,000 for something to load my sander. Not really wanting to work that hard in the summertime.
     
  10. paul soccodato

    paul soccodato Senior Member
    Messages: 430

    years ago i made the mistake of leaving my v-box uncovered one night when it was loaded with salt. never thought the salt would freeze into one solid block (same stuff you use to melt ice!). not cool being outside (in the freezing cold) on top of the salter with a pinch bar breaking it up.
    ahh i guess you learn as you go.
     
  11. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    I don't think that salt "freezes" in the sense that water does. I believe that what happens is some salt gets dissolved by either frre water or high humidity (warm) conditions. Then it solidifies into a solid mass as the water dissipates through the full volume of salt or the humidity drops and the water goes back into the air. This happens in conjunction with a drop in temperature, lowering the amount of moisture in the air as well as the mercury and giving rise to tales of salt "freezing". Probably not completely accurate but at least as appropriate as "frozen" bearings that have been exposed to the elements.
     
  12. KatWalk

    KatWalk Member
    Messages: 83

    My main man applied sand/salt to all our accounts with one 1.7 yard hopper due to bridging....he told me that he was really surprised at how far one hopper could go.........Chalk it up to learning experience!!!!!!:D