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Rural snow setup

Discussion in 'Residential Snow Removal' started by 56FordGuy, May 16, 2015.

  1. 56FordGuy

    56FordGuy Junior Member
    from Wyoming
    Messages: 12

    I'm trying to decide on the best setup for dealing with snow. I just moved to a place here in Wyoming, at the end of a 4 mile long dirt/ gravel road that the county doesn't maintain. There are 3 houses on the road, and one neighbor has a nice hydraulic V plow on his pickup that he's used to clear the road during the winter; and he's moving.

    So, I'm trying to find a reasonable setup for us. I have a 4x4 F-350 dually, and a 60 HP 4x4 tractor without a cab. I really don't want to use the tractor; no cab and I would have to replace the loader valve in order for it to float. I'm considering adding a plow to the truck, but have also been thinking about buying an older (mid 90's maybe) pickup with a plow already on it. I can find used plow trucks for $2-3,000 with straight plows on them. That would be nice because I would leave that truck setup for snow with ballast, chains, etc instead of using the truck we currently own and having to remove part of the snow equipment in order to hookup the gooseneck trailers or go into town. I'm a little concerned about the reliability of an older truck though, and I don't know if a hydraulic V plow would offer enough advantages for my situation to be worth the cost. If the V plows really are that much better, then I would likely just add one to the current truck. I can't see buying an old truck, then hanging a $6,000 plow on it.

    So, I'm looking for advice from the more experienced. I have a 4 mile long, somewhat hilly but mostly straight gravel road with 3 driveways that need to be plowed. Our last 'big' snow this year was about 14" plus drifts in the middle of April, and we got a small 4" storm a couple of weeks ago. I want to be able to plow as late as possible, instead of having to go out and clear it every 4-6". Would a V plow make a big difference there, or should I just stick with a standard straight plow? Would you buy a new plow for the current truck, or pick up an old beater with something already on it?

    Any advice would be very appreciated. I know it's kind of late in the season to be asking, but depending on which route I go I'm hoping to find something inexpensive in the off season instead of paying more once winter hits.
     
  2. k1768

    k1768 Senior Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 487

    Welcome to the site, tons of great info here with some manure mixed in, just like any other forum.
    This is not an unusual question, I'm sure you could find others here in similiar situations.

    Consistent 14" in one shot with any type of plow would not be fun or easy on the equipment.
    If I was in your situation and my budget allowed it I'd be shopping for a dedicated used truck with a V, and put a mount on daily driver as a backup. If you find yourself needing to bust through 14"+ a V is the way to go. A straight blade would be OK with drifts that size, but those amounts consistently not so much. Either way I'd be trying to clear it every 6" max. Make sure you get the banks as far to the sides as possible early in the season or you will quickly run out of room.

    What are the other houses on this road doing, why are you doing it all? Do they chip in on the expenses?
     
  3. 56FordGuy

    56FordGuy Junior Member
    from Wyoming
    Messages: 12

    In the past, the neighbor with a plow has maintained the road for everyone and we all chipped in for fuel and expenses. Now that he's moving, someone else has to take on the job. I'm looking at doing it because I have a two wheel drive company truck I have to be able to get out in, and I'm usually the first one that has to be out. Better for me to be able to plow it at 0400 than have to wait on someone else.

    This is my first year in this house, but I've gathered from the neighbors that 14" or so only happens two or three times a year. It's usually 6-10".
     
  4. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,196

    You're going to want a V plow if you're using a pickup.
    A tractor with a plow and blower would the ideal piece of equipment, you can handle just about anything.
    For what you're describing something like this http://denver.craigslist.org/hvd/5000219174.html would also do the job.
     
  5. Sawboy

    Sawboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,591

    Get the Vee, put it on your new truck. They honestly take two minutes to put on and take off.
     
  6. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    You're in Wyoming, so either a V or a blower is necessary, especially if you don't want to "plow with the storm".

    6" is nothing for a V, although the drifts might slow you down a bit.
     
  7. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,444

    A vee plow or a straight blade on a 3/4ton truck.
    plow it a couple of times during the "big storms"

    Get a set of tire chains and use counter weight.



    a blower..... why not a pay-loader with a vee-plow, and a blower attachment.

    Some of these guys would have you get a lawn mower with a snow-blower attachment or just a snow-blower.

    ps some parts of WY don't see much snow at all...fyi
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2015
  8. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,196

    The whole state is subject to heavy snow and wind, drifting is the biggest thing to deal with.
     
  9. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    I heard Wyoming only gets 4" of snow per year, the rest of the year it just blows around.

    My blower comment was just for simplicity and reducing drifting.
     
  10. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,444

    It melts... in the flatland of wy......
    yearly avgs.

    Boysen Reservoir Dam 11.9 "
    Fontenelle Reservoir Dam 25.7"
    Thermopolis 26.7"
    Cody 47.3"
    Worland 30.0"
    Torrington 32.4"
    Devils Tower 48.3"
    Buffalo 36.5"
    that's not much snow in my book, I guess it could be heavy depending on the water content.
    You will never see that much on the ground at any time.

    LARAMIE only gets 8.1"n avg for it's snowy month of March

    anything more that a single stage snow-blower is overkill....

    ps my blower and lawn tractor comment came from others recommendation for a 400ft drive, that also sees a lot of snow...lol
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2015
  11. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    I didn't know Wyoming had flatlands.

    And come on, cut the guy some slack, he needs at least a 2 stage for a 4 mile long road.
     
  12. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,196

    The snow drifts in anyplace there's a depression, you can get 4", the wind kicks up clearing the ground of snow to have it settle/drift down wind. I've been on roads where you crest a hill to find it had drifted in below. This is why there are so many snow fences there. If you've traveled the flat lands/ prairie county in Wyo you'll notice the roads are several feet above the grade and snow fences are where areas drift in due to natural formations in the landscape.
     
  13. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,444

    Yea, everyone thinks it's covered with mountains and snow
    when most of it is flat and covered in cactus of some kind. The high desert , I mean the Red Desert.

    Ok I agree a 2 stage for those days it mite drift in.;)


    You only see those elephant fences on those treeless hills to catch that blowing snow.

    a couple of pics of WY.

    4" could be half of a months snow fall.....

    The only areas that get a lot of snow in WY are in the mountains and the area.

    th.jpg dessert.jpg

    th.jpgred dessert.jpg
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2015
  14. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    Yeah, yeah, I know. BUT, compared to northwestern Ohio or Indiana or Illinois, Wyoming is anything but flat.

    Glad we could agree on the blower.
     
  15. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,444

    ^Thumbs Up

    You think?
    Id go as far as saying parts of Ohio, Indiana & Illinois are hillier than parts of WY, but they lack the mountains that only cover a small part of WY.

    I think WY is the lest mountainous state in the Rockey Mtns. If it wasn't for the Tetons MN might hillier.....:laughing:
     
  16. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    Agreed, certain parts are hillier. Or as hilly. Drive from Chitcago to St Louis and you'll know what I mean. Same with NW Ohio towards Cleveland and Columbus.

    Lots of rolling hills in much of WY, at least the parts I've been in.
     
  17. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,196

    Wow now I'm really confused, reading what is being said about Wyoming has me questioning where I've been going all these years to visit family, hunt, fish and vacation....... The place I go to has mtns just about every direction you look, some may be 50-60 miles away but they are there. Yes there are area where it's flat but those basins are surrounded by mtns or foothills.
    Looking this Topo I see a lot of mtn ranges, foothills and texture to the state.

    Topo.png
     
  18. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 8,444

    ^ your map just goes to show my point ;)
    not many mountains. About only 20% MTNs....
    Those rolling;) foot hills don't see much snow to speak of.(see the pics I posted earlier)
    Most of them are so dry they have cactus gowning on them.

    Yes, you can see the MTNs from afar, because it is so flat.
    ;)


    From the summit of the Grand you can see it all.:waving:
    ( yes, I have stood there)


    relax, the mountains do/can seea lot of snow,
    I've seen that to, as I was jumping into Corbet's Couloir, at Jackson Hole.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2015
  19. BUFF

    BUFF PlowSite Fanatic
    from FR NoCo
    Messages: 7,196

    So in the spirit of not wanting to argue/discuss the landscape of Wyoming we should agree to disagree.Thumbs Up
    I will say the best thing about Wyoming is the majority of the people that visit or pass through only see it from the hi-way.
     
  20. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    No nut jobs allowed there?

    From what I've seen-northern, central and southern - it's all beautiful.