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rubber edge pusher contstant adjustment

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by winterberry, Oct 10, 2014.

  1. winterberry

    winterberry Junior Member
    Messages: 5

    we have 8 pushers all with rubber edges, our largest 4 are 18ft and require constant adjustment. our operators are looking to be able to leave clean pavement regardless of packed or loose wet or not etc. its a constant battle. im considering swapping a few to uhmw polyethylene because its stiffer and may help. any thoughts? steel is out of the question and its expensive having one of our mechanics babysitting pushers during storms.
     
  2. dieselss

    dieselss PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,924

    I thought I read on here or somewhere else about them breaking in extreme cold.
    I'm not sure about your budget, but what about artic pushers?
     
  3. lilweeds

    lilweeds PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,178

    I've got a guy down here that makes em out of a harder material. They can still slip unless you stick lock washers under the hold down. Look up Aquajet services in Kutztown PA
     
  4. LapeerLandscape

    LapeerLandscape PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,585

    The question is is it wearing or is it pushing up. If its pushing up you could put some beads of weld across the box side so the rubber has something to bite into. Either way the polyethylene is a better material.
     
  5. winterberry

    winterberry Junior Member
    Messages: 5

    i think my problem is a little of both. the weld is a good idea if i keep rubber i will definetly be trying that out. maybe tack a few pieces of expanded metal behind the edge. though the arctic looks like a great product im not really looking for a new pusher now. the more i read the more im leaning toward giving it a try.
     
  6. LapeerLandscape

    LapeerLandscape PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,585

    We brought our first Arctic Sectional home yesterday. I have heard they push easier, don't bind like the rubber and hopefully give a closer shave = less salt.
     
  7. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    What kind of pusher?

    We very seldom\never adjust during the winter unless we replace the edge.

    As for scraping everything clean all the time, never going to happen and you're living in a fantasy world thinking differently.
     
  8. winterberry

    winterberry Junior Member
    Messages: 5

    thanks for all the input guys.

    i know that scrapping clean everytime is a fantasy, however i cant convince our operators and site managers of this. they want a pusher to scrape like one of our 9.5 fisher x-v plows. since i know thats not going to happen im looking for my best option in new edges or advice on rubber edges to optimize what i have. these are the same "operators" who cant figure out how to keep the pusher flat on the asphalt. since i cant make the call on who runs the pushers i have to keep making the more and more idiot proof.
     
  9. Citytow

    Citytow Senior Member
    from phila
    Messages: 548


    could be the machine its on isn't in float mode . just a guess .

    or the operator of the machine . I had that problem on a machine , kept popping out of float
     
  10. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    Float mode doesn't work with pushers.
     
  11. lilweeds

    lilweeds PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,178

    One option I've seen that helps level them is to have a set of rear wear shoes. It give the operators a stop so to speak.
     
  12. 1olddogtwo

    1olddogtwo PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,500



    Wow........just wow.
     
  13. Citytow

    Citytow Senior Member
    from phila
    Messages: 548

    Oh postmaster , that was a self inflicted foot in the grill right there .:laughing::laughing: on what machine / pusher / type of snow ? hurry , I need the CORRECT answer to this one .
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2014
  14. Citytow

    Citytow Senior Member
    from phila
    Messages: 548

    The wise advice seems to be: Choose only as much machine as you need. Typically, the largest pusher used with a skid steer would be around 12 ft in width, with 8-ft and 10-ft options being the most popular. To handle a 10-ft pusher you want a machine with at least 1,700-lbs rated operating capacity. In many cases, wheels beat tracks for snow removal. While nothing gives perfect traction in snow, wheels seem to offer more grip than tracks (especially if you switch to winter tires), and they do more to prevent sideways sliding of the machine. Now, assuming you have the machine all ready to go, what should you bear in mind when using your skid steer and box plow combination?

    It’s easy to carry a box plow back on the heels without realizing it. This causes the shoe to wear down excessively on the back portion. Carrying the box tipped forward on the toes of the shoe will create the same issue with uneven wear, as well as allowing snow to escape the box. To avoid this you need to make sure that the box is level before you start your plowing run, and then don’t touch the roll lever until the end of the pass. Some modern box plows have floating or self-leveling shoes, which take away a lot of the need for watching the level of the box.

    As a general rule of thumb, you should only apply a small amount of down pressure, if any. Pressing the plow into the ground with too much force will cause premature wearing of shoes and cutting edges. It can also cause the wheels of the machine to lift off the ground slightly, reducing traction. Choosing a box plow equipped with a steel trip edge will reduce the need to apply down force because a spring-loaded steel blade will slice through even hard-packed snow. Rubber blades work well with fresh or slushy snow.

    Some operators recommend having the arms of the skid steer in float mode while plowing. This allows the box to follow the ups and downs in the level of the pavement. On the downside you may feel you lack a certain amount of control with the arms in float. On the plus side, floating the arms will make the job easier in that you don’t have to continually adjust the position of the box to maintain even contact with the ground. If you choose not to use float mode, you will need to make small adjustments on the fly to maintain even pressure as the gradient of the ground changes.
     
  15. Citytow

    Citytow Senior Member
    from phila
    Messages: 548

    Some operators recommend having the arms of the skid steer in float mode while plowing. This allows the box to follow the ups and downs in the level of the pavement. On the downside you may feel you lack a certain amount of control with the arms in float. On the plus side, floating the arms will make the job easier in that you don’t have to continually adjust the position of the box to maintain even contact with the ground. If you choose not to use float mode, you will need to make small adjustments on the fly to maintain even pressure as the gradient of the ground changes.
     
  16. Citytow

    Citytow Senior Member
    from phila
    Messages: 548

    Some operators recommend having the arms of the skid steer in float mode while plowing. This allows the box to follow the ups and downs in the level of the pavement. On the downside you may feel you lack a certain amount of control with the arms in float. On the plus side, floating the arms will make the job easier in that you don’t have to continually adjust the position of the box to maintain even contact with the ground. If you choose not to use float mode, you will need to make small adjustments on the fly to maintain even pressure as the gradient of the ground changes.
     
  17. Citytow

    Citytow Senior Member
    from phila
    Messages: 548





    KNOW IT ALL .......................:laughing::laughing:
    If you choose not to use float mode, you will need to make small adjustments on the fly to maintain even pressure as the gradient of the ground changes.
     
  18. Citytow

    Citytow Senior Member
    from phila
    Messages: 548


    On the plus side, floating the arms will make the job easier in that you don’t have to continually adjust the position of the box to maintain even contact with the ground.
     
  19. Citytow

    Citytow Senior Member
    from phila
    Messages: 548

    yep , wow . pop pop was wrong ....again
    back of the bus
     
  20. Defcon 5

    Defcon 5 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,668

    I guess the key word is some operators.........Run pushers for many years.....I don't use float.....Citytow...before you fire back and call me an idiot...The key words here are .....I don't use float......You can do whatever pleases you....