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roof top cleanoff contracts?

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by csl, Dec 1, 2010.

  1. csl

    csl Junior Member
    Messages: 28

    so over the past 4 years our winters have been pretty harsh. we have been called in mid season to several large commercial complexs to clean off flat roofs for fear they may collapse. we always go over expectations with the owner/ property manager, etc. and we always mention that we are not responsible for any damage, oviously we cant see what is under 48" of snow too well. how many of you have contracts in place for security against any lawsuit etc? if anyone has one would you be willing to share? any other info would be helpful, thanks
     
  2. slave2lawns

    slave2lawns Member
    Messages: 46

    I never really thought about it, but hey another avenue to generate income.
     
  3. plowguy43

    plowguy43 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,269

    I do it all the time with my largest account (bank/foreclosed properties). Its a great way to make more money but is time consuming and labor intensive- unless you have a crew that is.

    I don't know how to really help, my account understands that things may get damaged- its common sense. But at the same time, a damaged shingle/downspout/whatever is MUCH cheaper than a collapsed roof.
     
  4. csl

    csl Junior Member
    Messages: 28

    its awesome revenue, but dangerous work. our lowest paid employee is at $20 an hour. we usually only due flat roof, have done a few pitched, but it gets a little scary. my main concern is that the business can say all day long that there is an understanding about damages, but unless its in writing its not worth it.
     
  5. hoskm01

    hoskm01 Senior Member
    from AZ
    Messages: 475

    We have specifications in place for roof clearing, including stipulations that we will not damage.

    Roof-top clearing is pretty rare in most parts of the country. Some parts (like mine, Flagstaff) experience conditions often enough that the city will MANDATE, by city code, that upon declaration, flat roofs will be lightened to some extent.

    The entire roof need not be cleared. Cutting paths and lightening the load is the name of the game. This is done in conjunction with your regular snow removal, so you have to have a whole other bank of labor at your disposal. For this reason, my roof clearing rate is 2.5 times that of regular shoveling. You might do a roof 5 times one year and then not do it for 5 whole seasons. Roof shovelers make 50 bucks an hour on my clock.

    If you are even considering going near a pitched roof for removal purposes, youre insane. Consider urea, and a broadcast device. Hit me up for more.
     
  6. csl

    csl Junior Member
    Messages: 28

    does anyone have a contract they could share?
     
  7. plowguy43

    plowguy43 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 5,269

    I must be crazy because I like pitched roofs much better. Most all are metal roofs and once you get some free'd up, it just slides right off. If your not careful or anchored then your going for a ride with it. Just make sure the truck is parked away from the house.
     
  8. Tubby's Snow Plowing

    Tubby's Snow Plowing Senior Member
    Messages: 199

    We use roof rakes to do pitched roofs. Flat roofs we have a small snow thrower.
     
  9. Schuley

    Schuley Senior Member
    Messages: 161

    We do some of it when things get deep here. Flat roofs get a rubber flap and plasti edge single stage blower and pitched roofs get a roof rake or shovels and blowers. We dig a couple verticle "paths" and feed them starting from the top going down, so you can't slip and slide off. You always have the snow below you to keep you from sliding. Through the snow into them and it slides down off to the ground. Then when your done you jump off into the 6' pile of snow below!
     
  10. Schuley

    Schuley Senior Member
    Messages: 161

    I should also add that those are single story homes with a 4 or 6 pitch roof at most. every 2 story by me has at least a 10 pitch roof so snow doesnt build up that much on them.
     
  11. Plow Babe

    Plow Babe Senior Member
    Messages: 218

    Before you do any roof work, call your insurance underwriter. Most snow plowing policies don't include roof work, it's a whole different classification. Also for workman's comp. If your employees are classified as shovelers or operators, putting them on a roof places them outside their insured classification. At least that's how it works in Colorado.

    We don't do roofs specifically for this reason. Unless we wanted to really branch out and get a lot of this kind of work, the added insurance is way to expensive to make it worthwhile. Actually in our area some of the commercial window cleaning companies also specialize in roof snow removal, because they already have the equipment and insurance for working off the ground.
     
  12. hoskm01

    hoskm01 Senior Member
    from AZ
    Messages: 475

    hey Snow Babe. I was just in your neck of the woods yesterday. Whats your story? First time Ive seen you on PS here, not that I'm on all that often.
     
  13. Plow Babe

    Plow Babe Senior Member
    Messages: 218

    Were you here for vacation?

    My expertise is more office and plowing than mechanical. Well OK, not mechanical at all! So I pretty much just comment on threads about the business side of things and weather/plowing. Sometimes things get too busy for me to visit PS for awhile, but I try to pop in every so often.
     
  14. hoskm01

    hoskm01 Senior Member
    from AZ
    Messages: 475

    I was there on business.

    Though, I lived up in Loveland for the last three years and used to spend every waking moment up there skiing somewhere when we weren't plowing down low. I hope your year keeps up with a good snowfall trend.