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Repairing a Lexan moldboard

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by wyldman, Jul 29, 2003.

  1. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    I have had a few e-mails lately asking how to repair a Lexan moldboard.

    I dug up this pic,it's so much easier than trying to explain how to "sew" Lexan.

    It will also work for Poly blades as well.

    Just drill small holes and use mechanics wire to sew it up.This repair is a few seasons old,and still works fine.Was damaged playing shopping cart hockey. :nono:
     
  2. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Snoway with repaired Lexan blade.

    lexan repair.jpg
     
  3. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    That is a nice job. Not worried about the thread pulling through the lexan?

    I had been told by a dealer near me that snoway would warranty the blades, but I guess not against a shopping cart.
     
  4. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    It was damaged by one of the drivers,and it was pretty obvious it had been hit by something.

    It has held up for several years,no signs of any tearing,or the stitching pulling out.

    I didn't bother with warranty,as it's not the original piece of Lexan that came with the plow.It has been replaced once already.
     
  5. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    I hit a cart in a parking lot once. This was with a Fisher. The plow was fine, not the cart.

    It was the shock of hitting the cart, man I thought I hit a car. I was not even going fat but the shock back through the truck was awful.
     
  6. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Usually the carts will slide,and you don't even feel them.We used to push them out of the way with the blade when plowing,and sometimes even play hockey with them.Every once and a while one will dig into the ground,and that's what broke the Lexan.I've had a few dig in with my truck,but 10,000 lbs,and the big Western just crumple them up and keep on pushing. :D
     
  7. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    This one was frozen in. Actually sheared two of the wheels right off. Threw the cart about 20 ft. Scared the heck out of me though.
     
  8. BWhite

    BWhite Senior Member
    Messages: 496

    Lexan

    I always thought polycarbonate was unbreakable??
     
  9. Lawn Lad

    Lawn Lad Senior Member
    Messages: 407

    That's a nice stitch job. I'll have to remember that for the next time we crack a mulboard.

    On a side note, I'm not impressed with SnoWay's warranty policy for their mulboards. If the lexan cracks of "natural" causes they'll waranty it. But if you crack it from hitting something, they call that a puncture and they don't warranty punctures. I was disappointed to say the least when we cracked a mulboard plowing residential drives. Don't know what we hit, but it wasn't your general road hazards in commercial lots. Oh well, hopefully others have had better experiences.
     
  10. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Lexan is pretty strong,but the thinner light duty stuff will crack in cold temps when impacted or crushed.It will crack or split,but it does not shatter.

    No mfg should have to warranty something damaged by impact.The Lexan will not crack or split naturally.

    The other cause of failure is where it mounts the bolted retainer strip at the top,and under the cutting edge.The Lexan will get pinched,or crushed,and will crack from the stress.Loose cutting edge bolts will also cause the cutting edge to "slam" or wear against the Lexan,and the Lexan will eventually fail.

    When shopping for a replacement sheet of Lexan,step up one size in thickness,as the impact strength is much better.Make sure the Lexan is not cut to tall,or it will wear on the bolts,or get pushed up under the retainer,or cutting edge,and eventually crack.
     
  11. Jerre Heyer

    Jerre Heyer Senior Member
    Messages: 948

    Chris, Nice job with the wire. Maybe you should have been a DR. and stiched up some people....Oops you are a DR.
    The Plowsite DR.

    I used to repair them but finally started taking them out and replacing with a Stainless sheet. No painting, no cracking. I will keep yours in mind though for the next one that someone wants to repair.

    Jerre
     
  12. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    I might go stainless on the Snoways next time.I have a friend in the sign business,and he will give me a sheet of Lexan every now and again,so when it's free I don't complain.

    The Plowsite DR.Maybe that could be my new title.Some guys got Plowsite Veteran,so maybe I should be the Plowsite Doctor ? or Plowsite Mechanic ? :D
     
  13. Jerre Heyer

    Jerre Heyer Senior Member
    Messages: 948

    Free in and $$$ out now that's my kind of mark up...LOL

    I keep a couple sheets of stainless on hand cause we do so many.
    kinda $$ but still cheaper than the lexan here.

    I need a deal like you have.
    Jerre
     
  14. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    What do you pay for a sheet of Lexan vs a sheet of stainless steel.What thickness or gauge are you using ?
     
  15. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Chris, do you think pop rivets with washers would work as well? That's how the outfit I worked for repaired trailer walls made of a similar material. They were 1/4 " rivets with fender like washers.
     
  16. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Were they riveting another piece of material on top ? or just using the washers to hold the crack together ?

    I'd think just using washers,the Lexan would still push out from underneath them,and open up more.Especially with the force of the snow on the moldboard.The Lexan probably wouldn't like the pop rivets,as the compression forces they exert on the Lexan would probably be enough to cause another crack.

    The wire sure isn't pretty,but it does work.Thank god I'm not a real doctor ! ;)
     
  17. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Yeah, they riveted a patch in place similar to what you did with washers on th rear. The rivet heads were oversized as well. It was just a thought, might be a bit quicker and easier for next time.
     
  18. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    I will keep that in mind,it would be much quicker.I have an air riveter,so it would be pretty easy.The wire stitching is pretty slow,and hard when it's below zero outside.
     
  19. Jerre Heyer

    Jerre Heyer Senior Member
    Messages: 948

    Chris, Sheet 4X8 of 1/8 or 3/16 lexan runs about $75.00. Hyzoid rhino board is a little more expensive but holds up better. You get 2 blades out of it.

    Stainless 4X8 is $50-75 per sheet for .030 or .045. I usually go with the .045. Depends on the # of sheets I get at a time. Usually have them sheared to 2X8 and cut with the plasma to size.

    Jerre

    Steve, We get alot with sheetmetal or ductwork patches on them held together with rivets. It gets you through the storm but won't usuall make it very long.
     
  20. BWhite

    BWhite Senior Member
    Messages: 496

    I agree with Pelican large head rivets with a backing plate (Washer) on the back would be a fast and strong way to attach an oversize patch. Lexan is a brand name there are a lot of manufacturers out there that manufacture polycarbonate to ASTM standards for a lot less money
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2003