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repainting an old Fisher

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by Megunticook, Sep 15, 2007.

  1. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    Ready to repaint my old Fisher I bought used. Still lots of paint on it, but lots of rust, too. Probably a good 10-15 years old (I've had it for 5).

    What kind of primer and topcoat will hold up? I noticed on a new pushbeam I bought from Fisher that the factory paint was peeling like crazy after only a season. Thinking I don't want to use the paint Fisher sells (although maybe they just did lousy prep. at the factory).

    What brand will really hold up? I used to paint houses and always went with the best product and tried to do meticulous prep. work. Would rather take the time and spend the money to do it right and have it last ten years (with annual touchup) than do something quick and dirty and have to repaint in 5.

    Am thinking I will brush and roll rather than spray.

    p.s.: how do you remove rust from those springs? thinking they almost would need to be dipped somehow...
     
  2. mc1

    mc1 Senior Member
    Messages: 171

    i would dissasemble the blade and push plate and sandblast the whole thing when you do this the surface should be smooth then just paint with a rust inhibiting primer and go to town i would not brush it on it will look like crap if you dont at least get rid of the rust on the blade snow will stick to it all winter long. extra weight = more abuse to your rig
     
  3. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,046

    Sand blasting is the best, but we wire wheel most of the time. The wire wheel is a dirty job but if you spend the time it will come out good. Wipe it down with thinners 2 or 3 times, then your ready for paint. You can't roll or brush the real good enamel paint but a good rust primer and paint will do. We bought a gravity feed HVLP gun for $50 a couple years ago and the expensive primer and enamel with hardener seem to stand up alot better. I am by no means an expert painter, we just try to fill in time around the farm painting stuff, The hardener when added to the paint really seems to make it shine and last alot longer. Your right about the prep work being the most important part.
     
  4. DeereFarmer

    DeereFarmer PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,296

    I agree with JD Dave only I rolled my paint and rust primer. It came out really well and lasted very nicely with the Fisher paint. It is a good quality paint. This is what it still looked like after a long season. Most of my driveways were gravel and dirt too.

    2.JPG
     
  5. YardMedic

    YardMedic PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    Nice looking plow there, First. Corners on the cutting edge are wearing pretty good though!
     
  6. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    edg

    Thanks for the replies. Here's a shot of the blade, base angle, and cutting edge. Everything is disassembled (don't think that has happened EVER with this plow).

    [​IMG]

    I was thinking the wire brush attachment on my angle grinder would get things down to shiny metal fairly quickly (although as you say probably a nasty job).

    My only concern was getting the rust out of some of the corners and hard-to-reach places.

    What about the trip springs? Seems like they would need to be dipped in something to remove rust.

    What specific primers have you had good luck with? Needs to be self-etching?

    Also, one of my angle cylinders is leaking. How much of a project is it to dissassemble and repack? Or am I better off just replacing? Think a pair of new ones runs $160 or so.

    Thanks for all your helpful advice.
     
  7. DeereFarmer

    DeereFarmer PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,296

    Yeah, it was a long season. My gravel driveway is about 1/4 of a mile one way with a long circle, another 500' gravel driveway, and a 15 car parking lot. Add on my driveways and one commercial lot and it was a lot of plowing for that truck which handled it perfectly. I only plowed one season with it before I sold it to upgrade.
     
  8. Wicked500R

    Wicked500R Senior Member
    Messages: 394

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    This is my 8' Fisher after about 1200 pounds of blasting abrasive:eek: and the front side is NOT done. The Fisher powder coat is extremely strong and wont come off sandblasting! But it cracks me up because it pops and flakes.. I would think a wire wheel would barely scratch the surface of the coating. My plan is to burn it off with a Oxy/ Acetylene setup. And then finish blast it after I get the powdercoat off. Then I will use a red oxide metal primer. Large flat spots rolled with a 4" roller and the nooks and crannies will be sprayed. Top coated with I dunno what yet. If you look close at my base angle...it is worn down to far from previous owner and needs to be replaced..525.00:eek: from my Fisher dealer..He has it in stock. Yours looks good! I will be installing all new trip springs,pins, bolts, etc. and that damn base angle! She should be like brandy new when done....
     
  9. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    I've started stripping paint off various parts (started with the small stuff first!). To their credit, a lot of the Fisher paint is on there pretty good. But the stripper takes it off with a couple applications.

    One question, though: when I bought the plow used 5 years ago (it's from the early/mid nineties), the lift arm had no grab hook (I improvised a bolt with a quick-release mechanism). As long as I'm repairing everything I want to have a new hook welded on there. What exactly did they use, and how was it configured? Can somebody take a photo of theirs?

    Also, it looks like Fisher is now using a new set-up to hold the chain. How does that work, and what would you recommend?

    Thanks.
     
  10. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,557

    What are you using for a stripper? Is your plow powder coated or painted, i'm not sure when they started powder coating. I am doing basically the same thing as you are, just mine is a MM1 and everything on it is completely taken apart, long process but fun!
     
  11. repo_man62

    repo_man62 Senior Member
    Messages: 502

     
  12. Wicked500R

    Wicked500R Senior Member
    Messages: 394

    I did not use the torches..I ended up stripping the powdercoat off with Permatex Gasket remover! Worked awesome and quick !!
     
  13. dzrick

    dzrick Senior Member
    Messages: 110

    Could you tell me how much of this Permatex gasket remover did it take?

    Where did you get it and how is it sold? quarts, gallons?

    I need to do something with the old plow I just got.

    I got a quote of $750 to blast and paint it but I'd like other options.

    Thanks,
    Rick
     
  14. repo_man62

    repo_man62 Senior Member
    Messages: 502

    Gasket Remover PERMATEX® Gasket Remover

    Quickly removes even baked-on gaskets and all types of gasketing adhesives and sealants. Removes gaskets from any type of assembly in 10 to 12 minutes. Prepares metal parts for new gasket maker and assembly. Reduces scraping and sanding. Prevents damage to flanges. Level 2

    Suggested Applications:
    Removes silicone, weatherstrip adhesive, dried oil, grease and paint
    Prod 80646



    Applications Of This Product

    * Removes Gaskets in 10-12 minutes.


    Related Products

    * More Permatex® Products


    Quantity Product Code Name Size Price
    P80646 PERMATEX® Gasket Remover Aerosol 16oz $5.02
     
  15. dzrick

    dzrick Senior Member
    Messages: 110

    Well, that was quick!

    Thanks Repo.

    Rick
     
  16. Wicked500R

    Wicked500R Senior Member
    Messages: 394

    Make sure you get the new and improved foaming action ! It works a ton better. I used 5 cans to do my 8' Fisher. Let it soak for 5-10 minutes, then scrape it with a spackel knife.. It comes right off..
     
  17. mcwlandscaping

    mcwlandscaping 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,557

    Where can you get that stuff? I'm VERY interested! And will it work on paint too?
     
  18. repo_man62

    repo_man62 Senior Member
    Messages: 502

    Ace hardware has it.
     
  19. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    I'm using something made by Zip-Strip called "Bare-Z-All" (http://www.starbronze.com/701.html.

    Working OK, sometimes it takes a second application to get everything, and I will need to go back over it with a wire brush or abrasive pad on my angle grinder. But gets down to bare metal pretty quickly. In some places it looks like the previous owner put on another layer of paint, so that may be slowing me down a bit.

    I don't think this is powder coated, but not sure. I haven't done much on the blade yet, started with the smaller stuff first to see how it works.

    Next step once the paint is all off will be to see about cleaning up the rust spots. May need to use a rust-blocking primer on some areas--anybody have experience with this?
     
  20. Megunticook

    Megunticook Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 190

    Got most of it stripped, wire brushed, and washed. Sandblasting would've been nice, for sure, but didn't have a lot of spare cash for this project. Here's one of the pushplates before getting cleaned up--pretty nasty:
    [​IMG]
    And here's some of the pieces after the strip/brush/wash routine:
    [​IMG]
    <p>

    [​IMG]
    <p>
    The stripping went really hard--that paint was really bonded well (in fact, in retrospect I probably should've just left most of the paint on after removing any loose stuff, rather than spending hours fighting the paint off).

    I was told by a pro car painter that "for the money" Rustoleum will do a decent job and am leaning toward that. The local Fisher dealer uses some Sherwin Williams stuff called Corathane pre primer (a rust inhibitor) followed by a primer and an enamel topcoat, haven't priced it out yet. Anybody on here have any experience with Rustoleum? Will their "rusty metal primer" keep the rust in check? I realize it's not going to be a showroom finish or anything, but all I'm looking to do is keep the blade smooth and slick so no snow sticks to it, preserve the metal from pitting and thinning, and keep it looking somewhat well-maintained.

    Now if only I can get a warm day to get the primer on...no heated garage to work in! Would it surprise you if I said I had planned to take care of all this in the summer?

    p.s. the pins are looking a bit worn but are maybe still serviceable:
    [​IMG]
    I tried to get replacements at the dealer but they didn't seem to have any (I know, hard to believe). Anywhere on line I can get these? Or do you think I should just clean them up and reuse?