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Reconditioning cutting edges?

Discussion in 'Western Plows Discussion' started by Blacksmith Cycl, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. Blacksmith Cycl

    Blacksmith Cycl Junior Member
    Messages: 20

    I know some of you construction guys have the teeth on buckets and other wear areas built back up with hard surface welding. If I remember correctly it is a specific wire that is available for a MIG welder. Is there any reason that it couldn't be done on a plow edge? I have a 220V MIG at my shop and I was considering getting the proper wire and building up the cutting edge.

    Anyone ever tried it or looked into it?
     
  2. Tony350

    Tony350 Senior Member
    Messages: 546

    I don't see why you couldn't do it. I have thought about it before, I am just to lazy and never really looked into it. I figured the wire or rod would cost a fair amount and my time is worth something, so I just repalce them when it needs it. Let us know how you turn out.
     
  3. Blacksmith Cycl

    Blacksmith Cycl Junior Member
    Messages: 20

    Well Airgas stocks 10lb rolls of Stoody (brand name) hard facing wire. Their website has you call your local store for pricing so I am going to check it out today.

    In the specs it states that carbide tooling is needed to do any post welding machine work (obviously for applications other than plow blades). If it requires carbide tooling it has to be pretty hard stuff which means it is wear and abrasion resistant. Fortunately hard metals tend to be easy to shape with grinding tools such as an angle grinder with a flap disc.

    If the price is reasonable I am going to pick up a spool. Considering that a wear bar goes from anywhere from $70- $100 on up depending on the application it might be worth it to spend 10 mins or so running a bead down the bar once or twice a year when I have the plow apart for maintenance or repair.
     
  4. Tony350

    Tony350 Senior Member
    Messages: 546

    I agree if you already have it apart it wouldn't be to bad. Good luck!
     
  5. Blacksmith Cycl

    Blacksmith Cycl Junior Member
    Messages: 20

    Well I got a price on the MIG wire. It is definitely NOT something you will find in Tractor Supply!! About $150 :dizzy::dizzy: for a roll and it is not available in smaller diameter wire. I may need a set of rollers for the welder as well. It is actually made for metal to pavement (or rock, concrete, etc) contact. Similar to the stuff that is used for excavator buckets and teeth.

    I may still give it a shot. I figure if i start with a new or close to new blade and run a bead on it a couple times a season I can make a blade last indefinitely. In other words keep replacing the weld as it wears rather than replacing the whole blade when it is completely worn.

    If I can do it for other people I should be able to re-coup my costs and maybe even make a buck or two.

    When i get the wire, and try it out, I will let you guys know.
     
  6. Tony350

    Tony350 Senior Member
    Messages: 546

    Is it a solid wire or a flux cored wire w or w/o gas just curious. The only stuff I have ever used was a flux cored wire using gas, and it spalttered alot, but I haven't seen it all by any means just wondering. Thanks for the update.
     
  7. fordmstng66

    fordmstng66 Senior Member
    Messages: 527

    I put curb guards on my new blade last year, they have carbide on the bottom and the sides, this has been 2nd year and have not seen any wear on my blade, I am sure price was about same other than ordering a new cutting edge, which I needed anyway. Lot less work also.