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Rear main seal-engine

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by Sydenstricker Landscaping, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. Sydenstricker Landscaping

    Sydenstricker Landscaping PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,882

    It has been leaking for a lil while, but has gotten a lil worse. Not pouring out, just leaves spots when parked for a couple hours. I know it isnt the filter or drain plug. I can see where it is coming out between the engine and transmission. My question is, will I have to pull the engine out?? And how big of a bear is it to replace this seal or will it need to be pressed in?? Or is there an easier way to do this?? (yes it is going to wait till spring, just want to get some ideas going and together now) I figure if the motor must come out, I will probably freshen it up then. It has 156K on it now, will easily have 160 or better by then. Nice and easy to work on with it out of the truck, lol. Last question, what company makes good gasket kits for the 6.0?? Im not scared of taking the motor apart, done it on a 350. Thanks in advance:waving:
     
  2. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Replacing the seal isn't bad Tom...once you pull the engine or the trans.

    Seal removal is standard procedure to any seal, just gently pry it out being sure not to damage the housing or the sealing surface on the crankshaft however installation is a little more work to do it properly and to insure it isn't damaged during the install. Some guys still take the risky route and work them in with a drift punch and a hammer but thats a good way of ensuring it leaks. There is a special driver/press tool thats to be used but you can make one from a short piece of heavy wall PVC pipe. Then simply use it to drive the seal in gently. You can also remove the seal housing from the back of the block and work with it on the bench (or picnic table for those running the three season garage :D) for better accuracy.

    For gasket kits I still prefer the FelPro's over anything else. Have yet to experience a problem with them on the LS engines. But just a note, they are not inexpensive to purchase them. Takes a few C-notes to get them all.
     
  3. Greenery

    Greenery 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,380

    Is this a leak up above the drain plug and filter? Mines been leaking from somwhere up there also and Ive been curious where it's coming from. I'm guessing it's the same seal.
     
  4. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    For that one I'd be likely to incline it's coming from the oil cooler connections rather than the rear main. A good light and some inspecting you should be able to determine for sure.
     
  5. Sydenstricker Landscaping

    Sydenstricker Landscaping PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,882

    Thanks B&B:waving: I figured the new gasket set was not going to be cheap at all!!! Not like the generation 1 5.7 engines where you can regasket for about 150. I almost always use fel-pro, but just wasnt sure if there was something different or better for the LS engine. I priced a set of the nice ARP head studs and almost shat myself when it gave me the price!!!! But I only go for the best on my stuff, not the low rent crap especially on an engine. Im not a fan at all of the drift punch thing. Ive seen the bad results of one going astray from a good smack of the hammer. Dont have a picnic table, but I have a friend with an engine stand to use:nod: It may be a 3 season garage, but Im slowly building up a very respectable assortment of tools to work on just about anything.

    While I got this open and going, one other question. I keep smelling coolant coming from the engine area as well. Cant see any leaks, nothing in the oil, etc. Every few months it gets low enough though to trip the low coolant light. I read something before about some kind of crossover coolant lines on the heads or something leaking??? Or am I getting this confused with something else??
     
  6. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    No you are correct there is a coolant crossover assembly that runs from each corner of the cylinder heads under the intake and they can leak from either the seals under any of the 4 banjo bolts or the pipe itself can fracture. It's not common but I've seen it happen. The weep hole in the water pump would be a much more likely candidate though. Have you checked it lately?

    Either location could cause a coolant smell with a small loss of coolant over an extended period of time.
     
  7. Sydenstricker Landscaping

    Sydenstricker Landscaping PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,882

    No I have not checked the coolant weep hole on the water pump. Will have to check that out. I bet that part is gonna be pricey if it is screwed:dizzy:
     
  8. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    You can see the weep hole much easier if you pull the skid plate down, if it's still on there.

    Can't recall the exact cost on the coolant crossover pipe but I don't remember them being too terribly expensive. Less than a Grant if memory serves me right. Water pumps are around $100 or so.
     
  9. Sydenstricker Landscaping

    Sydenstricker Landscaping PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,882

    Yeah that little plastic front skid plate is long gone, lol. I will have to climb under and take a look later this week when we get into our heat wave-30's lol. I figured water pumps will be a c note or better for that truck. Im guessing the coolant crossover pipe is a lovely dealer part though:mad:
     
  10. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    The crossover isn't a commonly failed part so there's no aftermarket supplier for it, so yes a dealer trip would be in order. However Dorman does have the sealing ring kit you'll need for it.
     
  11. Geez, Mike. I think I hear you saying that the "drop the oil pan, loosen the crank bolts, pull the old neoprene seal out and rotate the new one in method" isn't the way to go anymore??? I used to love to do that on my back in the driveway.....
     
  12. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    I still do plenty of those ones too. However I do like a one piece setup better for their superior reliability. Not uncommon for them to stayed sealed for the life of the engine.



    Except for Toms of course, but he's especially tough on stuff. :D
     
  13. RichG53

    RichG53 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,135

    I don't quite understand the use of PVC pipe ??? Are you using half the pipe length wise ???
    What size are you using ???
    I'm a Mcgyver when it comes to solving problems ...I just don't understand how you are using the PVC ...
    Thanks !!!
     
  14. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    You simply use the section of pipe with a block of wood across it to act as a driver so your pushing on more of the seals diameter as you hammer it in so you don't damage it as you would with just driving it in with a small drift punch. A 6" piece works nicely as it allows you some room to work.