1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Quick question

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by DJ Contracting, Nov 24, 2004.

  1. DJ Contracting

    DJ Contracting PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,392

    Would you go out and plow Commercial during a Holiday when they are closed the Reason i ask it's going to be 35 degrees on Thanksgiving day.
     
  2. Midwest BuildIt Inc

    Midwest BuildIt Inc PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,280

    I plow every time it snows. even if its a holiday or going to be warm the next day. as long as there's more than 2" push it.
     
  3. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    I charge a surcharge for services on turkey day and after 6PM xmas eve and all xmas day. I also do from 6pm dec 31 till 4am Jan 1. Not because I am partying but because I do not like to be on the road when others are "partying"
     
  4. plowed

    plowed Senior Member
    Messages: 344

    Yes, 24/7. You never know when someone will need to access the building, eg fire dept, security, etc. Plus, if it snows, then gets colder, that stuff will likely be more difficult to get up a day or two later.

    If it was my lot, I would expect it to be done right away, not a day or two later, unless you already have specified it in the contract and discussed it.

    I think it was two years ago when it snowed here on Christmas Day. We had relatives in from out of town, kids all over the place, etc. It was snowing all day pretty hard. We waited until 6pm that evening to go out and it was the worst decision I made. While it was fun to be with the family on Christmas, it was brutal to try and catch up on about 8" of snow, and it was still coming down. I think we ended up with about 16" overall, but we were out for literally 36 hours straight to get things done. We would have saved at least 12 hours had we gone out when we normally would have and kept up with it.

    Some of those lots were schools, professional buildings, etc. that were closed for Christmas and I took that for granted. I'll never wait again.
     
  5. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    I do a couple of factories and I do not even touch them after xmas until just before new years unless there is a LOT of snow stacked up in them. The owners like it that way too because they are closed during that time and I have beem doing it that way for years with them.
     
  6. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    You want to be familiar with your State laws in this matter. In some states, business owners are responsible for parking areas and walkways to their business, regardless of their operating hours. Since they have hired you to manage their snow and ice, liability may have passed to you or is now shared with you. If you do not plow as contracted, you could be considered negligent and totally liable as the owner's lawyer will claim that is was your responsibility to monitor the site and provide service, as needed, in his absence.

    In Maine, the law is not nearly as restrictive. A business owner is not required to clear snow until "a reasonable amount of time" after snowfall has stopped.
     
  7. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113


    Their lawyer is going to have a tuff job trying to "blame" you for anything other than non performance and you not getting paid. Also on private property, if the bussiness is closed, you really have no reason to be in lot anyway. Unless you are silly enough to sign a contract that passes potentail injury liabilty to you (and you would have to be crazy to sign that too) you have little to worry about.
     
  8. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Ok. I still just advise anyone providing services such as snow and ice management, be aware of the pertinent laws in their state.
     
  9. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    I Agree, no need to be blind about it completely
     
  10. Plow Meister

    Plow Meister PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,174

    I am in the same dilema right now. I know I have to get the gas stations done but all the industrial lots and strip malls I figure can wait until it melts which will be tomorrow afternoon. I hear ya Mick about the statutes and liability issues and such. That is a very good point. I think I will have to look into Indiana's stautes and see what's up.
     
  11. PLOWMAN45

    PLOWMAN45 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,829

    you have to for fd police and the people who will try to slip and fall
     
  12. DJ Contracting

    DJ Contracting PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,392

    Thanks for the info My brother is a general manager for a chain restaurant and says the the state law here in MI. is no later than72 hrs. after a snow fall, anyway I had several of my business called and said to come clean up the night before they open Some most on Thursday and one on Saturday. All res. will be done early Turkey morning.
     
  13. Dwan

    Dwan Senior Member
    Messages: 879

    Our family has opened presents in the front seat of a plow on christmas before. if it snows we plow that is what we do and why we were picked over our compitition.
     
  14. tonybands

    tonybands Member
    Messages: 31

    I could not agree with you more. Anyone who waits is jeopordizing his reputation. I have been pushing snow since 1984 and never lost a customer for this reason, however, I have gained many!:)
     
  15. RidgeCon

    RidgeCon Senior Member
    Messages: 144

    Our families understand that this pays the bills and as much as we don't like to we chose this business and that means being on call 24/7 and ready to go WHENEVER it snows...the calendar or clock means nothing during snow season.
     
  16. larryjlk

    larryjlk Member
    Messages: 66

    I find it amazing how many different answers you can get from everybody in the same business. Makes you wonder how some of these guys stay in business. Seems to me you contracted to plow, so plow. I have a small medical building that's only opened 4 days a week, if it snows he gets plowed whether he's opened the next day or not. The only thing that might make a difference to me is when I plow him which means i might put him at the end of my run since there's no real hurry. I plow when it snows whether it's a holiday or not. Keep listening to some of these guys and you'll be out of business very soon.
     
  17. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    Not if the guy does not want it plowed when he is closed and you plow it and bill him. You must keep client happy and let him decide, not you, and if he does not want it plowed when he is closed (because sometimes it can melt on its own over a few days) you must do what he wants not what is best for your bottom line because they have a bottom line too.
     
  18. RidgeCon

    RidgeCon Senior Member
    Messages: 144


    I agree with you , that is as much of a chance as we will take with any of our contracts, to change their order if they are not open but they still get plowed before we call it quits for the storm. :nod:
     
  19. Plow Meister

    Plow Meister PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,174


    Listen Larry,

    You seem to be new here and I don't think you have the experience to judge who here is a reputable plower or one who is just out to make a quick buck and split.

    To be fair, I did leave a few lots unplowed for the simple fact that we barely got 2 inches of plowable snow. Plus, the weather forecast called for warmer temps throughout the next day. That and the addition to today being a holiday and the lots that I did leave unplowed are closed anyway led me to my conclusion. I know for a fact my customers will be very happy with my decision which is why I have maintained my original clients since I pushed my first snowflake over 10 years ago.

    Larry, I bring in about $40,000 per year in income relating to snow plowing, salting, and removal. I have a vast client list that keeps growing every year. I don't lowball. I don't undercut to get my foot in the door. I get all my clients from referrals from other satisfied customers. I don't piss around with driveways and I only cover a 15 mile radius from my office. I am fully insured (actually over-insured since my wife sells insurance :cool: ). I belong to SIMA as well as vasius local organizations such as the local Chamber of Commerce. I am also a volunteer firefighter as well as the owner of a party rental store.

    Now, based on all that, do you think I would screw myself by not plowing a customer because I simply don't feel like it? I COULD have made about $3,000.00 last night but I opted not to in order to keep my customers happy.

    Larry, before you go shooting your mouth off I suggest you learn more about the people on the boards and try to learn something. :)
     
  20. larryjlk

    larryjlk Member
    Messages: 66

    Tarkus you're absolutely right, Not if customer does not want it plowed. That's a whole different scenerio than what was originally said. As a contracted snowplower, I wouldn't just make that decision hoping the snow will melt before they show up for work again. If the customer tells you not to that works for me too.