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Quick Question

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by BVLAWNCARE, Oct 1, 2004.

  1. BVLAWNCARE

    BVLAWNCARE Junior Member
    Messages: 2

    I am starting up my business this winter with the hope that I can get some snow removal customers while getting my name out for the Spring and what not. I am new to this forum and it is a pleasure to be aboard.
    How is everyone doing today?
    I just have a quick question...
    I have two 42" Snow blowers and I got a call yesturday from a lady that has a small church parking lot (about the size of two full size driveways) and she wants me 2 come by and give her a quote tomorrow. I was wondering if there is a guide line for charging. Like maybe $11/sf or something that like. I do not want to over or under bid the job. Thanks guys!
    Vince
     
  2. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Nothing like that. That question is asked a lot in one form or another on here and usually doesn't get answered. No real good answer because there are so many variables. But I tell you what - if the " average driveway size" you're talking about is say around 12'x50', try shooting her a price of $50 and watch her reaction. If you've got experience with a snowblower, you might consider if you'd be happy with $50 for that lot. You can't really go wrong - if you're too high, she won't hire you and you can negotiate lower. If too low, you'll figure that out with the first snow. It's called a learning experience.
     
  3. Dwan

    Dwan Senior Member
    Messages: 879

    Figure out what your overhead is, insurance, fuel, equipment, equipment maintenance, labor, repairs, bookwork, office supplies etc. add enough to feed your family, cloths, roof over there head, utilities, etc. (you get the picture? Then add a % to make a profit. and to cover unexpected expenses. Divide that by the number of hours a year you will be plowing and that should give you a good rate to charge by the hour.
    Simply put cover your expenses and make a living. Only you can figure how much you need without us getting into your personal life.

    Plowing rates go from $25 per hour to $150 per hour.
    I have seen blower rates as low as $10 per hour But I would have to get at least $125 to get out of my truck into the cold wet miserable night, cover myself with snow let it melt get wet then back into my truck for the next job.
     
  4. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Dwan, he's 17 years old with a snowblower and this appears to be his first potential client. I doubt he has all that.
     
  5. BVLAWNCARE

    BVLAWNCARE Junior Member
    Messages: 2

    actually, ive been doing lawns and landscape construction for three years. I have done many jobs this is my first snow plowing job. I am just going to buy a plow for my 2004 Dodge truck that I bought from all of my other jobs from my business. So please, before you say that I do not have all that, think before you type.

    Thanks
     
  6. Dwan

    Dwan Senior Member
    Messages: 879

    Mick; What I listed was just an example and not meant to suggest he had those expenses or assets.
    My response would still cover his question. or anyone who is in any business. they just have to add or take away the expenses they have compared to the ones I listed.
    In other words charge enough to cover expenses, and make a good profit.
    Because he does not have the same overhead as you or I is why it is so hard for us to tell him what he should charge. I suspose what would work best would be a formula and let everone fill in the blanks.


    Dwan
     
  7. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    What I typed wasn't intended to insult you. I did think before I typed. I read through your post, then went to your profile. Since there is no real "formula", I suggested a kind of "middle of the road" based on the equipment you list and the configuration and characteristics of the area you listed. Without being there, this is probably a good starting point for you and her to negotiate.
     
  8. aees115

    aees115 Member
    Messages: 43

    rough crowd here
     
  9. QMVA

    QMVA Senior Member
    Messages: 431

    I would say charge by the hour. May look funny but go out their and walk a line at the pace you would with a snowblower. Then multiply that by how many times you would have to walk it to finish the job add a few min for what not. Divide that by 60 and then multiply by o maybe $120 and their you go. I don't think you will have to change your price much for different amounts of snow because your snowblower will go about the same speed, at least mine does. Hope this helps you out. :waving: