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pusher or plow?

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by jlmac, Oct 13, 2001.

  1. jlmac

    jlmac Junior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 16

    I did a search but did not find an answer to specific question so here goes: I have a loader that needs to move around to several properties. From what I have read a pusher would be best for the loader but can't be driven on the roads because it would be too wide. Can someone recommend a good angle plow for a 2 yard volvo loader. Not thrilled with the idea of paying big bucks for a plow but a pusher just doesn't seem to be practical. Any ideas would be helpful.

    Thanks
     
  2. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    Try talking to local police and a road commisioner or local equivalent. They may tell you that they bend the rules slightly for emergency vehicles such as a plow vehicle. I've seen trucks that had materials projecting way off onto the shoulder of the road with wide load permits, so a 10.5 foot pusher should be transportable if not completely legal. I'd not waste my money on a straight plow for that machine!
     
  3. John Allin

    John Allin PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,327

    Most locale's won't give you a hard time with a 10 ft. pusher on the front, when transporting. We often drive 14 footers around, but it's ususally during a storm and since we get alot of snow here it's expected and recognized as being necessary.

    If you get a 12 ft. plow for that rig, and angle it you'll still be over width abit.

    If you feel you're forced into a plow, trade the loader for a backhoe. Snojob is right.... a plow on a loader (in parking lots) is really a waste of money.
     
  4. jlmac

    jlmac Junior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 16

    SnoJob & John thanks for the reply. From everything I am reading the way to go on this loader is a pusher. Roughly how long would it take a loader with a 10 ft pusher to plow a 6" storm in a corporate headquarters of 500,000 square feet? Is the only way to figure this out through experience?
     
  5. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    In my opinion, what you really want to try to figure is how long it would take for a truck. I'd say two trucks, five hours to clear in a 2-4" storm if it is not too small and chopped up areas.

    If you figure two trucks times 5 hours, an average push would go for 10 times the hourly price you shoot for per truck when you bid. Any efficiencies gained by more efficient equipment go in your pocket.

    Regarding the 10.5' pusher; My general feeling is that it would take you 5 hours to clear the lot in a 2-4 inch snowfall. Maybe 7 hours for 4-8 and nine hours up to 12 inches. These are "educated guesses." Maybe someone here with more experience with the big equipment can give you more realistic numbers to start from?
     
  6. jlmac

    jlmac Junior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 16

    SnoJob - your figures look good. Are 2 trucks, say 3/4 ton with 8 foot blades and the loader with pusher adequate for this size property? The property has many walkways we'd be taking care of with a ride on snowblower. That would be $50 per hour for the walks, $100 per hour for each truck, $125 for the loader & pusher. If I charged out an average storm for $4,000 and based the season on 15 storms (which I do all my contracts) I'd be in the $60,000 range for the plowing and walkways, not including sanding. Is this possible? Do contractors get this much for this size property? I've seen here Walmarts, which must have somewhat equal square footage, go for 30 grand. Most comments are that 30 grand is too low. Looks alittle like I am just throwing around numbers, but I've got to start thinking dollars. This numbers game is fun. I plow a 6000 square foot lot for $6500 and a 112,000 sf lot for $10,000. This works out to roughly 10 cents per square foot, interesting. Many other factors involved.
     
  7. John Allin

    John Allin PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,327

    It's very difficult to look at a grey and white screen, with nothing but letters on it - and come up with a price to plow a lot. Loads of variables to take into consideration.

    However, I agree with the philosophy of pricing out the job with trucks and then re-engineering the project with pushers after the fact and once you have the job. Especially if there are very few contractors in your market using pushers as of now.