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Pump coupling snapped off

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by SBrav77, Dec 9, 2005.

  1. SBrav77

    SBrav77 Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    I think I have found the answer to a question that I asked earlier. I think the coupling that goes into the pump on my Western plow, which the quick disconnect then connects to, has snapped off inside the pump. I made a dumb rookie mistake last year. I need to know if it is possible to have a plow dealer drill out the snapped off piece and replace it. If so, about how much do you think they would charge. Any help would be appreciated. I'm still a newbie with plowing.
     
  2. Acmemechanic

    Acmemechanic Senior Member
    Messages: 137

    Broken Off Coupler

    My Way is gonna Require Some tools That you Probably dont have but when done You will be glad You Got.#1 Dremel tool #2 Carbide Tile cutter bits #3 Good Vacuum.Get another person to hold the running vacuum hose as close to the work as you can,Insert the tile cutter bit inside the broken pipe and make 3 = cuts slowly in 3 = spots 10 o clock 2 o clock 6 0 clock just until you see the threads of the other part just touch them NO DEEPER vacuum and vacuum again to get the chips.Then with a ***** punch sharpened almost needle sharp tap at a slight angle inward the three pieces of metal left get needle nose pliers and remove.To install new one add more teflon tape then you usuallly would and check for leaks any questions e-mail me at acmemechanic@yahoo.com:realmad: :realmad: :realmad:
     
  3. Acmemechanic

    Acmemechanic Senior Member
    Messages: 137

    Broken Off Coupler

    My Way is gonna Require Some tools That you Probably dont have but when done You will be glad You Got.#1 Dremel tool #2 Carbide Tile cutter bits #3 Good Vacuum.Get another person to hold the running vacuum hose as close to the work as you can,Insert the tile cutter bit inside the broken pipe and make 3 = cuts slowly in 3 = spots 10 o clock 2 o clock 6 0 clock just until you see the threads of the other part just touch them NO DEEPER vacuum and vacuum again to get the chips.Then with a ***** punch sharpened almost needle sharp tap at a slight angle inward the three pieces of metal left get needle nose pliers and remove.To install new one add more teflon tape then you usuallly would and check for leaks any questions e-mail me at acmemechanic@yahoo.com:realmad: :realmad: :realmad:
     
  4. Acmemechanic

    Acmemechanic Senior Member
    Messages: 137

    Coupling repair

    Hows about an update.Just Curious as to your success!!!!!!:)
     
  5. Robhollar

    Robhollar Senior Member
    Messages: 766

    Why not use an easy out?????Rob
     
  6. Acmemechanic

    Acmemechanic Senior Member
    Messages: 137

    Easy Out

    If you have ever used an Easy out then you know that they really are nothing like the name says.#1 in this case you are dealing with a tapered pipe thread in which the nearest edge is also the tightest.The easy out gets its grip by expanding in the inside Diameter of the nearest edge.Which on atapered thread is already the tightest part.So with too much useless force applied the tempered steel of an Easy out snaps off and usually at or below your work surface and then even a carbide alloy has a problem getting that EASY THING OUT.So you tell me Why not an EASY OUT.You really didnt think the whole problem through I Guess,Or you just lack real Hands on tool knowledge!!!!
     
  7. SBrav77

    SBrav77 Junior Member
    Messages: 13

    I had success in getting the coupling out. It took a little more work than I thought. But, it wasn't too bad. A buddy suggested that I take a cut off wheel and notch the coupling a little bit. Then take a flat head screwdriver and put it in the notch and just twist it out. That didn't exactly work. I ended up grinding the coupling down to get it a little more thin. Then I took my screwdriver and chipped some of the coupling out. After a little work, I was finally able to get the rest of the coupling to unscrew. Now, the only problem is, I have to wait till Monday to take a trip to the local plow dealer to get a replacement coupling. I was able to save the quick disconnect nipple. There was enough of the coupling that I was able to grip it with vice grips and twist the nipple part off the screw.I checked our local Farm and Fleet. But, they don't carry 1/4 inch couplings. Which is the size I need. Another dealer that carries plow's and accessories said they could order one. It would take about 7 days though. I'm sure the plow dealer will have the piece.Then I'll just need to add ATF fluid since I lost quite a bit. Hopefully then everything will be good to go. I want to thank you for your help. It was very much appreciated. I"m sure I"ll need more help in the future.
     
  8. Robhollar

    Robhollar Senior Member
    Messages: 766

    You bet I have used one before, but there are diff types of easy outs. On one of my spliters the oil drain had a extention on the oil drain. Well there isnt a guard around it and I managed to hit it with a piece of wood and snap it off. I went to the plumbing supply house and got a easyout made for pipe work. I think they are also called an internal pipe wrench. Well needless to say it came rite out.

    Hey Im glad to hear you got it out. You may want to flush out the pump, its better to safe then sorry later.....Rob
     
  9. PaleRider

    PaleRider Senior Member
    Messages: 112

    :waving: I Agree with Robhollar, No matter what you use to take out the damage piece. At least change the oil in the pump. Drain it out and wipe it down.

    PaleRider :gunsfiring: