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Private Road Bid

Discussion in 'Bidding & Estimating' started by Snowpower, Oct 12, 2007.

  1. Snowpower

    Snowpower Senior Member
    Messages: 636

    Site is two miles exactly, 25 feet wide, no curbs, two cul de sacs, 8 hammerheads and two entrances. Ones divided..

    Using a 8 foot blade with wings, I should be able to clear three inches here in two hours, right?

    And I figure about 300 lbs of salt per lane mile at about 25 degrees. (Im hoping to get away with less) More if its in the teens or lower obviously.

    What do you guys think. Am I in the ballpark?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2007
  2. JeepPlow18

    JeepPlow18 Senior Member
    Messages: 658

    You should outline it. Is it all the streets with houses?
     
  3. Snowpower

    Snowpower Senior Member
    Messages: 636

    lol. I thought it was pretty self explanitory.

    Yeah. All the streets with houses. On the left is a train tracks and the main road out front(on top) is not included. Or that little farmhouse between the entrances, I dunno what that is.
     
  4. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,760

    Roads are FAST.
    you don't ever have to back up, you don't have to push the snow anywhere, you just angle back as you go by a driveway.

    I bet you could do this in a little over an hour and a half. (3")
    4 passes (2 one way, 2 the other).
     
  5. Snowpower

    Snowpower Senior Member
    Messages: 636

    Yeah and this place is smooth as glass too.

    The association is grumbling about financial woes but this is a sub of 900,000 homes and all brand new. :rolleyes:

    So anyways.....I need to make the price right but I do think it will be a nice fairly simple site to do (Might even have fun....the other commercial I do is a Mini Storage..Not always fun) plus It will hopefully snag a few resis too.

    I already have one in there but actually am going to do my guy for free for the lead if this thing pans out.

    Fair is fair.
     
  6. powerjoke

    powerjoke PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,341

    we plow 30mi roads for $100 lane mile plus salt we also assist the county and hopefully this year a small town
     
  7. cjasonbr

    cjasonbr Senior Member
    from Mass
    Messages: 635

    Some might consider a private road bid with no curbs or obstacles pretty "self explanatory". But oh well.....

    That might take 2 hours your first storm, but you'll cut that down quick. The real money is in all the Driveways!!!! Tell the association you want to bid on everything - everyone's DW's including the pvt rd.

    Explain that everyone will save money and otherwise they would all be hiring independent contractors which would F up all your work and thus cost the assoc. more for you to fix in the end. If you plow that place as perfect as you can - you'd definitely be going back to clean up when the screwballs get done with some of those driveways.

    Edit: Even if only half the people wanted you to plow their DW's you make over twice as much. Get in there and take advantage of all these people that obviously don't have anyone to plow for them!!! Quicker you act, more you'll get.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2007
  8. Snowpower

    Snowpower Senior Member
    Messages: 636

    Good thoughts CJ.

    I am hoping to secure a few more resis in this sub.

    Im hovering around the 200 dollar range for up to 6 inches, and 325 for 6 to 12.

    I pay.06 per lb for salt, and am hovering around 150 per application.

    Unfortunantely I can get beat on the salt price because bulk guys with their own piles are only paying .02 per lb.

    But 200 a push and 150 per salt has to be a nice price for 2 miles of high end roadways.

    I know my questions were more about time and product applied but thats my numbers so far. In pencil.
     
  9. cjasonbr

    cjasonbr Senior Member
    from Mass
    Messages: 635

    Well if you can't beat your competitors price focus on your better service. I read somewhere on here: 'We sell our service, not our price". You should be focusing on selling your service anyways.

    The quicker you tell that assoc. about your interest in DW's the more you'll get.

    I could tell you what i'd charge if it were in MA, but that wont do you any good. sorry.
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2007
  10. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,760

    I have a private road in a high end subdivision as one of my contracts. We sent out letters to everyone on the road to do their driveways. We didn't get everyone, but we got a couple and that's totally gravy. Talk about a "tight route". Most county/cities are on the web now where you can look up addresses and owners to send targeted marketing.

    and, as you say, the guy that got me in, gets his for free.

    2nd thought.
    More snow isn't really going to be tougher here. Normally of course, in a regular lot, doubling the amount of snow takes a LOT longer because you have to keep pushing it into piles and stacking it and you can't take big bites. But here you furrow everything, you never push into a pile (ok, at the end, but that's tiny), the bite size doesn't matter much. Re-think your 6-12 bid. It's not really going to take much longer.

    3rd thought, I bet the HOA really is struggling, it's new, has few cash reserves, and all the houses aren't built (but all the streets are). Sometimes getting in the first time means you have that contract for years, because it's work to change. Might be worth talking with the HOA president person adn saying "hey, since there aren't many driveways I can do it cheaper this year, you know help you guys out, but as more houses get built, I'll have to up the price. (slower to go around driveways) but I really want to be here for years. (you do for me, I do for you)
    Just a thought.
     
  11. Quality SR

    Quality SR PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,828

    That was some good advice Lonecowboy. This is a good thread alot of good info. Keep it coming.
     
  12. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Well, I can speak for plowing associations from several perspectives. I lived in a "high-end" one with 90% occupancy, I looked into buying in one where I was the first buyer/occupant and now I've bid three developments with driveways over one mile (withdrew the bid on one and got the one which I plowed for four years and the third I'm on the second year). My advice is:

    Set your price for plowing the road. Same price whether it's one occupant or a hundred. People buying into developments know they are going to be responsible for road maintentance. If you buy say the first lot on the road, you will have it plowed to your house and there will be no need to plow beyond that point until someone else builds. So, find out how much of the road needs plowed and give a price for that. It's up to the Association President to collect the Road Maint account and pay you out of that. As more of the road is added for plowing, your rate will increase accordingly. If the whole thing needs plowed and there is only one occupant, then he'll pay it. Usually, though, there will be others you may not be aware of, as lots are being sold and houses are being plannned/built.

    Don't put too much stock in that "HOA is really struggling" crap. Everyone there knows the costs associated with the association and the dues are set before the year even begins. If more is needed, a meeting is set and residents/owners are made aware of that. A modification is made to the HOA fee structure and it gets collected in a certain amount of time. Even for getting a plowing contract, a meeting is called. All owners/residents are invited and proposals are reviewed and one is chosen. At that time, it will be established that there is or is not enough in the maint account. The HOA itself is not "struggling"; the owners pony up the funds, if needed.

    The last one I did and the one I have now is all paid by one person. He then goes around to others to see if they want to help him out. Those are kind of unusual circumstances. But the point it, to me it doesn't matter. I set a price for what he wants plowed. If he collects from others - good for him, but doesn't make any difference to me. Oh, the fact that there may not be as many driveways has no bearing on how long it takes to plow the roads. If you can do it for less than you wanted this year, why aren't you going to be able to next year? What's to keep them from getting someone else next year when you want to get what you should have gotten this year?
     
    Last edited: Oct 13, 2007
  13. Snowpower

    Snowpower Senior Member
    Messages: 636

    Thanks CJ, LC and Mick et all.

    I like the idea of one price so I will make that so, and you're right. It wont get much tougher, plus....Obviously I am not going to let more than just 3-4 inches ever accumulate in a fast moving storm.

    It is an investment type site in the sense that there is a lot of other work there I want in summer, and you never know who lives in there that will see me and know me and like what I am doing. What company they own, or they work for.

    So many times lately one thing has turned into another or something that never panned out, my name got to the right person and something else came of it. It's actually pretty good advertising so in my mind.....I can let that sortof make up for the difference between what Id love to charge and what I will charge.

    They asked to have the contract emailed but I have nice presentation folders and letterheads and such and will be dropping off a package Monday to the person involved.

    I want this gig.

    Any further information on salt usage? Im hearing my 600 lbs per road mile or 300 lbs poer lane mile is low. My research tells me its close.

    Im not new at this but this will be my first season solo and applying salt.
     
  14. gqnine44

    gqnine44 Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    We are doing one this winter (2.3 miles) for the first time. We are charging $350 per push. Obvisouly some storms will require more than one push. We are charging by the pound for salt. I would love to hear the averages for salt usage per road mile.
     
  15. Quality SR

    Quality SR PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,828

    You are charging by the pound? How do you do that? I thought it was by the ton?
     
  16. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,045

    What's the diff isn't there 2000 lbs in a ton. Maybe he's using bags.
     
  17. Quality SR

    Quality SR PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,828

    That is a hell of a lot of bag for 2 1/2 miles dont you think? Plus the price to buy the bags are more then buying a ton of bulk.
     
  18. JD Dave

    JD Dave PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 11,045

    I agree but ther's still 2000 lbs in a ton and $150/ton works out to $.075 / lb
     
  19. Quality SR

    Quality SR PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,828

    I agree with you on that. But something that big, plus depending on the storm and the temp. Bulk i would think would be the way to go. Not bags. All those bags you have to open and dump in to the hopper.Plus you pay more for bagged. I paid almost $20 for a 50#bag last year. Thats $800 for 40 bags ( or 2000#) If you put down 1 ton, 1 1/2 tons, or 2 tons. You would charge by the ton or half of a ton right? Am i missing something here? :dizzy:
     
  20. gqnine44

    gqnine44 Junior Member
    Messages: 18

    They dont want the whole road salted (just the hills and curves). We will be doing mostly plowing even at .75 inches. This is our first year with a road so it may make more sense to switch to tons. When we do charge this way we charge .17 to .19 per pound. Maybe this is too high (if there is such a thing).