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prices on snow pushers

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by DAVE IN BUFFALO, Sep 23, 2003.

  1. DAVE IN BUFFALO

    DAVE IN BUFFALO Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    Hi everyone,
    My friend is offering me a "like New" snow pusher. It is a 12 ft Pro-Tech That is exactly what I'm looking for. I've called around, and they want 3200.00...He doesn't need one this small anymore, so he wants to get rid of it. I saw it and it was used at 1 acct for 1 year. It looks like new...shoes fine, bottom edge great..paint barely scratched. He is going to give it to me for 2000.00!! Do you think this is good?? I can't seem to find any used pushers for sale to compare this to. Please let me know......

    Dave
     
  2. gordyo

    gordyo Senior Member
    Messages: 527

    Which model is it??

    Skid Steer 12'
    Backhoe 12'
    Loader 12'
     
  3. PINEISLAND1

    PINEISLAND1 PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 664

    12' skid steer model is $2100 from protech till Oct 31,2003.

    12' backhoe model is $2775...

    12' loader model is $3150....

    I would think twice before I spent $2K on a used one, unless it was the loader model.
     
  4. DAVE IN BUFFALO

    DAVE IN BUFFALO Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    I dont think my friend would steer me wrong...but who knows...what is the difference between the loader model and skid steer model??
     
  5. Clean Cut Lawns

    Clean Cut Lawns Banned
    Messages: 53

    loader model is built stronger and taller than a skid steer
     
  6. DAVE IN BUFFALO

    DAVE IN BUFFALO Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    Does anyone have dimensions of loader models vs skid steer vs back hoe models handy??
     
  7. JCASULLO

    JCASULLO Junior Member
    Messages: 4

    what type of machine is this for. Pusher are built differant for each machine. what did your friend use it in???
     
  8. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,317

    www.snopusher.com has all the models and specs.

    Typically, the skid steer models have the Quick Tach plate welded onto the back, so they could not be used on a loader or backhoe.

    The backhoe model is typically not as tall as the loader model, and not as heavy as the loader model.

    Both the loader and backhoe models have posts on the back that the edge of the bucket slides in between to mount them.

    ~Chuck
     
  9. DAVE IN BUFFALO

    DAVE IN BUFFALO Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    Well I checked out the specs of each. First let me say this...Thanks to all for the Help!! I physically went to look at the different models. The 3150.00 12ft loader pusher is mean!! Heavy guage construction...and it is 48 1/2" tall. The used model, 12 ft loader/backhoe model, for 2000.00 from my buddy is not as tough. It is beautiful but it needs a set of shoes(Priceon shoes anyone???) Urethane edge is fine, and never turned or flipped.(unit only used 1 season)..construction is not as heavy guage. It is only 38" tall. The price seemed right though. My friend tells me that the difference in height does not matter. Now I am asking everyone their advice in this matter. Does the difference in height really matter in your experience?? Please be honest....I don't want to buy something and it not be right. I will be pushing it with a Case W20 loader...Plenty of power!!!Again...thanks for the advice in advance... dave:drinkup:
     
  10. PINEISLAND1

    PINEISLAND1 PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 664

    Commercial accounts, you will probably push every 1-3 inches anyway, so you are probably never going to notice the difference in volume between the two.

    You can save $800 plus tax and maybe shipping, I think its worth it myself, if its what you need.
     
  11. SnoJob67

    SnoJob67 Senior Member
    Messages: 384

    You will notice a small difference in production using a loader model versus a backhoe model. The shoes are at least $300/ pair. I would get the right pusher for the job. (loader model)

    You may spend a bit more money, but that loader will handle a larger pusher than a 12 footer and I'd HIGHLY recommend that you do not use a backhoe model on the loader since the loader model is engineered for loader use.

    You may be able to run a 14 0r 16 footer on that machine, which would make a tremendous difference in production for you. Pay more up front and benefit more in the long run.
     
  12. Clean Cut Lawns

    Clean Cut Lawns Banned
    Messages: 53

    Snow Jobs on the right track.
    Pay a bit more now and get it back quicker.
     
  13. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,317

    On the subject of shoes.... IF that pusher has seen as little use as you say, the operator was not using the pusher properly. When running a pusher, you want the bucket on "float". Down pressure will not help the pusher scrape better, it will just wear the shoes faster. The pusher must be sitting on the ground with the shoes level when pushing. IF it is tipped too far forward, the "toes" of the sids will wear fast. Tipped too far back, and the "heels" of the skids will wear fast. Use down pressure, and the skid centers will wear fast.

    When you mount the pusher, have a helper leat you know when the bucket is in the right position, with the skids sitting flat on the ground..... then don't move the bucket again! When you get to the end of a push, just raise the loader arms to pile up the snow. There is no reason to "dump" or otherwise curl the bucket when using a pusher.

    You will notice that Pro Tech in particular, has the end plates of the pushers cut on a downward angle. It is VERY difficult from the operator's postiion to see when the pusher is sitting squarely on the ground.

    As far as the 10" height difference (among other differences) it is because the snow load will create enough resistance for the machine to break traction, so the extra 10" is no help, as well as the additional weight of the extra 10" and the heavier design of the loader models.

    The load can build up and stop a backhoe fast, and a skid steer even faster, but, a loader can go and go, and go (depending on the loader). For instance, a CAT 980 could go for hundreds of yards pushing a 20' without breaking traction. There will be spill over, but mostly from the ends. The exception is heavy wet snow, but even that moves with the bigger iron much further.

    ~Chuck