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Pre treating

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by Vaughn Schultz, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. Vaughn Schultz

    Vaughn Schultz PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,565

    How do you guys get commercial accounts to allow you to pre treat lots be for snow?

    what benefits does it bring?

    Blizzard%2.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2005
  2. Bad Luck

    Bad Luck Senior Member
    Messages: 741

    :eek: Holy crap dude.

    I'd love to rip down that on a sled.
     
  3. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    Not sure, we've been doing it for so long, they just accept it.

    Benefits: You see that picture, if pretreated properly, that ice could just be scraped off. Without pretreatment, lots of salt and lots of plowing.
     
  4. digit

    digit Member
    Messages: 94

    pretreat

    I'm interested in learning more about pretreat. How long before it snows or right when it starts?
    Also how much do you put down the same as if you just plowed?
     
  5. 84deisel

    84deisel Senior Member
    Messages: 696

    I uaslly pre treat hours before the storm.we use salt only and how much depends on how much snow or ice we are expecting.Another big benifit to pretreating is that if there is traffic volume ,it will keep the lot more passable during the storm.As stated earlier we have been doinging it for so long that our customers prefer it.When you make out your contracts, make sure you talk to your customers and explain the benfits and most should have no problem.
     
  6. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    digit, it all depends on what you are using to pretreat or anti-ice. Granulars are usually applied just before the storm hits or when it first starts. Liquids can be applied just about anytime before the storm, some up to 2 weeks prior.

    If you are using granular, it is going to be far less than a de-icing application. What you are trying to do is prevent the snow from bonding to the pavement so plowing is easier and you can do a much better job of scraping to bare pavement and also extend the time that the job is 'safe' or passable until you get there to start with removal operations. Just like 84diesel stated.
     
  7. digit

    digit Member
    Messages: 94

    Thanks for the reply I,m going to try it on some sites that I salt at my discretion and maybe talk to manager at a place where i need to get papers signed. I use 100% rock salt I just didnt want to put it on to early.
     
  8. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    No problem. The obvious problem with granular and applying it too early is what happens if it doesn't snow? The parking lot turns white. So you are correct, you don't want to apply to early.
     
  9. 84deisel

    84deisel Senior Member
    Messages: 696

    also dont worry about the white coating on the pavement after the storm as it is a brine layer that will help prevent black ice and refreeze
     
  10. digit

    digit Member
    Messages: 94

    Thanks for the info .I have about 15 acres I take care of now and working on another 11 acre lot so I will deffinetly try it.
     
  11. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    84, in some areas people don't like that white layer on the parking lot, they see it as wasted money. They also see it as harming the environment. I know from being in Lansing, Detroit, Indiana into Chicago different times during the winter, that white parking lots\roadways are not issues in those areas.

    The other issue not only with potentially 'wasting' salt by the storm not hitting, is the fact that once rock salt breaks down and turns the lot white, it becomes a particulate which can become airborne and cause air pollution, damage to trees and shrubs up to 500' off roadways and the additional corrosion to vehicles and infrastructure. This is one of the reasons sand and salt are not used on a very wide-spread basis, if at all, out west in the mountains, in addition to the pollution of surface and groundwater.

    This is one of the many reasons we use liquids to anti-ice. It uses water as a carrier, so the water evaporates, leaves the active ingredient intact on the surface until water hits it and it reactivates.