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power steering

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by Detroitdan, Dec 20, 2006.

  1. Detroitdan

    Detroitdan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,937

    The other day I was going over the truck and noticed the brake fluid looked black, so I changed out just what was in the reservoir, did this once before a couple years ago, so hopefully I'll eventually get ahead of it a little. Anywho, I was under the hood with the turkey baster and a drain bucket, decided I may as well change the power steering fluid in the reservoir too, had a big bottle of Prestone PS fluid with leak fixer that I bought for my last project. So, sucked what I could from the reservoir and refilled with fresh, now I know I'm not flushing the lines but I figure refreshing half the fluid is far better than none at all which is what most trucks get for service. Next day I thought the steering felt like it had a little catch in it, today I was parking it at work and had little or no power steering, intermittently at very low speed. It was warmed up, I let it run 15 minutes then drove it five miles. Checled the fluid and it looked fine, Belt is a serpentine, only about a year old. I don't see how it could have been slipping, and I don't see how I could have gotten air into the lines either. Think my pump is going?
     
  2. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    How did the old fluid look when you sucked it out? If it was pretty dark and nasty looking then it was probably long over do for a change.What can sometime's happen when you put fresh fluid in a system that has a lot of varnish and gunk in it is that the additive's in the new fluid will start to breakdown the dirt and varnish and then it starts circulating it through the system and will plug up or restrict the passages and spool valve's in the pump and box. You might be able to do an actual full system flush with fresh fluid and it might save it. If it doesn't then it's new pump and box time! The same thing happens to transmission's too.Someone will wait way to long to do a fluid and filter change, the fluid get's broken down and start's to varnish things up in the tranny.Then when the fluid finally does get changed (usually by a new owner) the new fluid begin's to clean all the crud and varnish out of the tranny (tranny fluid has a lot of detergents in it) and before you know it, the tranny's toast.
     
  3. Detroitdan

    Detroitdan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,937

    Well, I was thinking kind of along those lines, but what I was thinking is the new fluid will sometimes cause a leak for the same reason. I hadn't thought about having a blockage because of it though. How hard is it to get a line off and flush it? I've never had good luck with pulling off old lines, usually wreck something and end up spending twice as much. The fluid that came out was a little on the dark side. Not as black as the brake fluid was though. Don't know why that would be because I rarely tow with it and I'm real easy on the brakes.
    BTW, its a 97 Chevy 6.5 diesel 153k miles
     
  4. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Well,I guess it depends on how rusty they are.To do the flush you'll want to remove the return line (low pressure) at the pump this is usually just a rubber hose with a hose clamp so it's not usually a big deal to remove.
     
  5. rayf268

    rayf268 Senior Member
    Messages: 117

    I know on alot of older bikes this is a big problem with fuel tanks and carbs the fuel varnishes then you put in cleaner it brakes it up then it clogs jet and valves .
    gunk show up when you try to take care of things funny how that works