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Plowing with a 2WD

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by musclecarboy, Aug 26, 2007.

  1. musclecarboy

    musclecarboy 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,303

    Hi Everyone,
    Is plowing with a 2WD truck possible? I'd be doing residentials if that makes a difference. Would it help to have extra weight in the back?
    Thanks.

    p.s. I kno I'm asking a lot of questions, but I'm just trying to prepare myself for plowing as best I can.
     
  2. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    The secret to plowing with 2 wheel drive is weight. The rig has to weight A LOT. examples are DOT trucks. mega tons working roads that are continuous cared for. Traveling from place to place is a nightmare in 2wd. While the load weight gives you forward traction with out lots of weight on or power too the front wheels steering is a hassle. If all you did was a single lot, the site were properly prepared you should be able to do it. But driveways I wouldn't try. Chains will help but are not equal to 4x4.

    If you are considering plowing on a commercial basis and limiting your work to residential drives you might want to consider a wrangler, or similar short wheel based 4x4 with body on frame construction. Maneuverability and visibility would be an advantage in those situations. I have a customer using a wrangler with a aftermarket "pick up style" soft top. Has a small hitch mount spreader, loads the rear with material and makes a ton of money doing residential drives. He's blistering fast, in, out and done before I can get my full size rig turned around.
    Reading your posts I get the feeling you're looking for the unattainable, to quote anonymous, there an't no free lunch:waving:
     
  3. musclecarboy

    musclecarboy 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,303

    Thanks for the reply. I'm new to this, and being new brings ingorance. I guess I'll learn a lot this year.
     
  4. PLOWMAN45

    PLOWMAN45 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,829

    oh yeah you better get some good tires and chains
     
  5. Philbilly2

    Philbilly2 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,566

    I plow in 2wd with my 2500HD Chevy. The only time that I really need to use 4wd is to push back piles, or in a wet heavy snow. You nailed the secret on the head. Weight is keey. I carry a 100 gallon fuel transfer tank center on my rear axle(full, approx. 800 lbs.) and a little over 800lbs of tractor weights at the far back of the truck box. But, don't bee cheap and expect to plow snow with a 2wd truck. I am only stating that it is possilbe to use only 2wd some of the time. In a pickup truck you will need 4wd to push snow.
     
    Last edited: Aug 26, 2007
  6. owl

    owl Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    Basher,
    What plow does your friend have on the wrangler?
    owl
     
  7. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Customer actually, 7'6" 22 series snoway, with down pressure, poly wearedge, and a wireless remote.
     
  8. SuperPlow Guy

    SuperPlow Guy Inactive
    Messages: 79

    Consider a SuperPLow?

    All good input for normal plows but with a SuperPlow you could maximize using the 2WD set up its gives you the weight (in the rear) where you need it. It's great for residential especially to eliminate back dragging...check it out when you get a minute www.superplow.com
    cool:
     
  9. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992


    Creating diminished braking, and under-steer, a superplow on the back means finding a way to counter balance it's weight. Just as you will need a LOT of rear counter weight if you where to install a "normal" snowplow. if you If anything it would be a worse choice for commercial 2wd applications. Would work well for the private owner who dosen't need to transport on the road.

    Nothing wrong with a superplow or any of the rear blades but a 2wd pick up is not really a option regardless of what kind of plow.
     
  10. SuperPlow Guy

    SuperPlow Guy Inactive
    Messages: 79

    Basher is right.

    Good Point it is like many other suggestions an option.:)
     
  11. musclecarboy

    musclecarboy 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,303

    Judging by the amount of wheel spin that envoy was doing in 4WD, there's no was a 2wd will be able to handle that plow. It makes it even worse because you have to drive thru the snow first, increasing the risk you get stuck.

    Cool product though. Better suited for homeowners that don't wanna attach a bunch of stuff to their trucks.
     
  12. SuperPlow Guy

    SuperPlow Guy Inactive
    Messages: 79

    right, homeowners, and FMP guys that can see the benefits... The Envoy spin was due to freezing rain before and during the storm. Does that a lot next to the coast. I need better tires and plan on getting them this season.
     
  13. Philbilly2

    Philbilly2 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,566

    This is a neat product for homeowners looking to spend the whole afternoon playing in the snow. A product like that could leave you S.O.L. in a bigger snow if you have accounts waiting to be cleared. If this is where this post is headed, then no you can't plow in 2wd. That product has no way of directing the snow, and no downforce. If you have ever seen a plow truck pick-up his plow, the front end of the truck squats. That shear weight shows why a regular plow will cut snow. Doing residentals is best done with a drag box they have sides on the the box and downforce to cut through the snow. IMO But if you have nothing better to do with your time, feel free to jump my a$$. I can take it just as well as i dish it.
     
  14. SuperPlow Guy

    SuperPlow Guy Inactive
    Messages: 79

    No Debate

    The idea was to compliment a front mount give weight at the same time NOT replace a FMP. No offense taken as there is a market for us and contractors who have broken away from the pack and tried us LOVE it! We have the testimonials and customers to prove it. I realize that it's not for all and that's Ok by me. We'll convert the world one person at a time :nod: Again NO debate we are an alternative.

    PS. we do have down pressure and trip, and the pivot is intuitive ...
     
  15. Philbilly2

    Philbilly2 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,566

    Well put. I stand down.
     
  16. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,853

    Is there any liability involved in using the hitch for mounting a plow? I.E., changing the use of the hitch?
     
  17. SuperPlow Guy

    SuperPlow Guy Inactive
    Messages: 79

    Another Good Question

    No, it is classified as a Accessory like boat,snowmobile,utility, trailers etc. Class III hitches are rated for specific weights/forces our plow does not exceed them. If a vehicle can tow a 8,000lb. boat then it can take our plow.(example) We have had customers check with their Mfg.'s if they are concerned and have not had a problem. Specifically for unitized body's that can not take a FMP without voiding warranties. F150. Tundra, Jeeps, Ridgelines, etc. (I know these are not all uni bodies) but there are various years that FMP are not recommended for some vehicles without voiding the Warranty... We have also designed our plow so that the reciever pin is a "lynch pin" that will shear under force so that the frame of the vehicle is not affected of course common sense applies..
     
  18. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    So a hitch with a weight carrying capacity of how many lbs is required to use your units?
     
  19. SuperPlow Guy

    SuperPlow Guy Inactive
    Messages: 79

    Hitch Data

    Here is what the Reese Hitch has to say about class III hitches:

    http://www.reeseprod.com/

    Class III
    Class III hitches are weight carrying (WC) and also are weight distributing (WD) hitches depending on the vehicle and hitch specifications. Not all Class III hitches are rated to be both. The hitch specifications will alert you to a hitch that is not weight distributing. Class III hitches used as weight carrying is rated up to 6000 lbs. gross trailer weight (GTW) with a maximum trailer tongue weight (TW) of 600 lbs. Hitches that are used for weight distributing are rated up to 10,000 lbs. gross trailer weight (GTW) with a maximum trailer tongue weight (TW) of 1000 lbs. The use of a ball mount and hitch ball of the same rating or higher is required. To use the weight distribution side of the hitch a weight distribution system is required. Class III hitches attach to the vehicle frame only. Always consult your owner's manual for vehicle rating.

    8 ft. SuperPlow is 420lbs:) .
     
  20. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    You left out the part where Reese says " not to exceed the vehicle manuf. maximum weight capacity."

    The critical phase in your post is "rated up to 600/6000"

    Oh and the hitch engineers will tell you for every 18" you extend the ball you lower the weight capacity by a third.

    Most mid and down sized PU and SUVs are rated 350/3500 WC, the Jeep Wrangler/Grand Cherokee and many others are rated at 200/2000 weight carrying regardless of the hitch. look a the weight ratings on a Jeep factory hitch or check the owners manual. Changing to another manufacturers hitch won't increase the factory capacity.

    100 lbs on the ball is the equivalent to 150 lbs over the rear axle extend 2 foot the multiple increases to 200lbs. So if your 460lb unit extends 24" or more if's effect on the vehicle is equal to 920lbs in the bed.

    not all class 3 hitches attach strictly to the vehicles frame. the newer factory Chevy hitches are attached to the bumper as their rearmost support. The early ones did some strange things under W/D loads.

    Have you discussed your unit with any of the hitch engineers? Cequent (Reese, drawtite, Hidden Hitch, and SurePull, all the same assembly line they just add different stickers) can be tough to get to but the Curt guys are super helpful.

    Not bashing :)D ) just curious.