1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Plow Wheels Assembly

Discussion in 'Residential Snow Removal' started by sday88, Nov 27, 2009.

  1. sday88

    sday88 Member
    Messages: 59

    I've been working on putting wheels on my plow and I finally got it to where it's in an operable condition. I took the front end of my old lawn tractor, split the box frame in half, connected it with some angle and mounted it on the plow. Since I mounted it to the plow on each side with only one bolt, here's a couple things I still need to be concerned about:

    1) There's a chance that the vertical adjustment could move while I am plowing. I'm not as concerned with this as I am the next item.

    2) I am concerned that the angle that's bolted to the plow could rotate on the bolt if there is enough pressure put on it, and therefore bind things up. I'm trying to figure out how to prevent this from happening.

    I'd like some constructive criticism on the set-up and how I could possibly make it better. I had big plans to put some sort of vertical adjustment using something like a car jack, but I'm running out of time before it gets really cold and snows so I had to basically throw something together as best I could.

    Here's some pictures:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Crash935

    Crash935 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,377

    I hate to ask this, but what purpose do the tires serve?
     
  3. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    I think the tires are supposed to keep the blade from digging into soft gravel. Unfortunately, as the snow goes under the cutting edge, the tires are going to ride up on the snow, lifting the blade up further and further.

    Those two bolts are never going to hold that setup. You need some sort of of gusset.
     
  4. sday88

    sday88 Member
    Messages: 59

    Yes, that's correct. And before someone asks, the shoes I have don't work either. They just dig into the gravel and then the blade starts pushing gravel.

    I actually didn't think about that, but doesn't this also happen with shoes?

    Yeah, I know, hence the reason I listed it as a concern and that I need to come up with something to keep it from moving.
     
  5. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    The shoes push stuff to the sides. Which is why they dig into soft gravel. Most of us just bump the blade up a bit when plowing gravel.
     
  6. sday88

    sday88 Member
    Messages: 59

    I've read that people do that and I'm wondering if my plow is different. When I raise mine up it wobbles up and down on the pivot point. So it doesn't just stay an inch or two (or whatever) off the ground. One side may be off the ground, but the other side might be digging in to the gravel. It actually has several inches of travel like this. Should it be loose like this?
     
  7. Jack33

    Jack33 Junior Member
    from NH
    Messages: 22

    Your plow wobbles because it is a manual angle plow. It is loose so that you can move it. Most of us have blades supported by large pins and hydrualic cylinders.

    You have good reason to be concerned about strength. I really don't see this lasting more than a few times. I plow a lot of gravel driveways. I use shoes if necessary for the first couple storms. After that, there is a good hard packed layer of snow and gravel that keeps the blade from digging in. Snow and ice fills in low spots and makes a fairly flat surface to plow the rest of the winter. I guess I am wondering if this creation is worth it?

    But, I like shade tree creativity! So, have you thought about modifying the shoe setup instead? The advantage of a shoe is they hold the weight of the plow without the stress of pushing the snow, well most of it. A wider shoe with a taller front curve will not dig in. I'm thinking maybe the front ski section of a snowmobile bolted underneath the blade? Maybe 10" long? Or make your own out of something a bit stiffer. Maybe a rolled edge for the cutting edge?
     
  8. sday88

    sday88 Member
    Messages: 59

    Well, that makes sense about why mine wobbles. I'm starting to wonder if this creation is worth it too. I tested it and as soon as I started pushing, the wheels didn't straighten out and it pushed the whole assembly back. Gussets would have prevented the assembly from pushing back, but if the wheels don't straighten out then what good is it?

    I really have no way to work with the shoes. I don't have a welder, nor do I weld, so everything I do has to be drilled and bolted. I also have a pipe that I just tried to split, but all I had to do it with is a metal cutting blade on my table saw. Needless to say the cut ended up going crooked. I just don't have the tools for fabrication work like this. I guess I'll have to go buy another piece of pipe and have someone split it for me.

    Prior to this year, we had a pretty well packed drive/road so I didn't care about pushing some gravel and I plowed with the blade full down at all times. We just invested over $3000 in the drive/road and I do not want to push all that away. I may be screwed!
     
  9. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Why not make a gravel edge? It's a lot easier and much less complicated.
     
  10. sday88

    sday88 Member
    Messages: 59

    Do you mean a split piece of pipe? If so, see my post right above yours, next to last paragraph.
     
  11. GatorDL55

    GatorDL55 Senior Member
    Messages: 122

    Run a brace as shown in the picture below. It will give you front to back stability. Also, two small springs in the middle should return the wheels to the home (straight forward) position.

    brace.jpg
     
  12. sday88

    sday88 Member
    Messages: 59

    I've already started fabbing a couple braces that I'll mount just above where you show it. The only thing about the braces is that I now lose my vertical height adjustment. Once I put the braces on it's in that position and I can't raise or lower it, unless I slot where the brace is bolted to the vertical angle then I run the risk of it moving again.

    The spring idea may work. Where you have them drawn though is the section that doesn't move. The angle just in front of where you drew the springs is the tie bar between the wheels. Look at the second picture I posted. I do have a thought about how to keep the wheels straight no matter what position the plow is in, I just need to look at the assembly again and see how/if it will work.

    Thanks for the input.
     
  13. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    A quick slice with a plasma and a couple of weld tabs can not be that expensive. Cheaper then a quality steel cutting blade for a table saw.

    As light as the plow is I would think you could use a heavy walled plastic and a couple of through bolts in blade mount holes