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Plow truck set up

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by hauler1000, Mar 10, 2013.

  1. hauler1000

    hauler1000 Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    I am expanding and had a question about plow truck set ups. I picked up a large multi location contract and was wondering the best way to set up my trucks. There are 4 zones of 5-7 locations each. I am thinking of running pick up trucks with swing away spreaders so we can carry our snow blowers also. But am concerned about the labor intensive loading of bagged material. Also the extra expense of said material. Or possibly running vbox spreader and fabricating a snowblower carrier to ride on back and either side of spreader chute. The zones are spread between a 50 mile radius so a dedicated sidewalk crew isn't cost or time efficient during a snow event. The locations within the zones are no more than 7 miles apart. Any suggestions would be helpful. My thought is to keep the plow crews independent so when the crews leave the properties the lot is finished.
     
  2. leigh

    leigh PlowSite.com Addict
    from CT
    Messages: 1,997

    50 mile radius? Better to sub out locally.If you had those sites this year you would never have even made it that far with these crazy storms ,especially feb 8 and this past fri.Many roads closed with multiple accidents.I've kept my 29 accounts in a 8 mile radius.How you going to move loaders around that distance? If you didn't have a loader on the 8th you were royally screwed!Just saying.
     
  3. hauler1000

    hauler1000 Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    The entire contract is spread over 50 miles. I split it into 4 zones of 5-7 locations each. Each location will have its own plow, salter, and snowblower. The radius of each zone is about 8 miles. That's tight enough for any storm. I didn't need a loader for anything this year with the accounts I already service, which are similar in nature. We plowed with the storm and had a pre- storm plan on where to place the snow while plowing. The final plow after the snow was difficult but doable. At that point most accumulation was only 10 inches. The locations are about 3/4 - 1 acre of parking plus interior and municipal sidewalks. All stand alone properties.
     
  4. R75419

    R75419 Senior Member
    Messages: 137

    When I was an employee of the company I learned snow removal from we used 2 truck teams (3 man crews, 2 drivers 1 shovel monkey) for every property other than the resi. We found this to be the most efficient as we had one truck with bagged goods and blowers and one truck with bulk salt. Now that I am on my own, we set up my Dodge with a 11'6" flat bed so we have room for the blower and the hand spreader in front of the salter. That way on the really light snowfalls I dont have to call in any help. As we grow I will add trucks and subs so I can maintain the 2 truck teams. It is amazing how much more gets done because one guy will rat out another if they are not pulling (pushing :rolleyes:) their weight. Point being you may be money ahead to find a sub willing to haul your blower (if you dont have room in your pick up) and have your plow guy carry your shovel monkey so you have a solid crew hitting each property fast and hard which all adds up to more payup in your pocket,
     
  5. hauler1000

    hauler1000 Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    something to think bout. I was also thinking the flatbed. What was the truck and chassis. I saw a 3500 the other day with 8ft spreader on the back of a12ft bed and the front wheels were bouncing off the ground. Seemed very unbalanced.
     
  6. R75419

    R75419 Senior Member
    Messages: 137

    We are running a Dodge 4500 with a 4 yd spreader it doesnt get to ass heavy on that truck. The big thing is going to be your cab to axle number, I have seen some guys put 12 foot beds on trucks that should have only had 9 foot beds on them. One of the guys I know around here has the set up I just described and that truck sucks to drive when there is snow on the ground, no steering or stopping!
     
  7. hauler1000

    hauler1000 Junior Member
    Messages: 22

    What's you CA on and 11'6 bed
     
  8. R75419

    R75419 Senior Member
    Messages: 137

    84" cab to axle is what mine is, 60 " CA will do a 9' bed if your buying a truck the class 4 and 5 trucks have a much smaller turning radius due to the wider set on the front axle, the bad is they cost more in liscensing and maintenance items.