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Plow Pump Abuse!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Big Nate's Plowing, Dec 1, 2004.

  1. Big Nate's Plowing

    Big Nate's Plowing PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    Goodlord it is amazing what you find in some peoples pumps.. here is some pics from a pump I tore down yesterday, the first one is of the strainer in the base of the e-47.... there was approx 1/8" of gunk trapped on the outside.
    [​IMG]
    obviously this unit was used hard and put away wet but the more disturbing thing was in the bottom of the sump....
    [​IMG]
    yes your seeing right, almost ½" of black sludge on the bottom and the cap to a bottle of plow oil.

    Please do yourself a favor and avoid problems this winter by simply draining/flushing the hydraulic system on your plow and if it is acting weird change the fluid ASAP if you continue to run a unit that is full of sludge/debris it will only make problems worse.... once the filter plugs up and the pump starves for fluid you are causing the pump to run dry,running a dry pump = damage... damage = $$$ if anyone has any questions just post them on this thread and I will try my best to answer them

    I will be adding a how to to this thread on hwo to do a basic flush on meyer, Fisher&Western isarmatic units and Boss units as well.
    Nate~
     
  2. Plowlikehell

    Plowlikehell Member
    Messages: 73

    I changed my hydraulic fluid yesterday, and I have a couple of questions for you.

    1) What is the proper procedure for exchanging the fluid in the angle cylinders? I was told by a parts supplier to open the hoses ( I used extra fittings) and rotate the blade one way till one of the cylinders is fully collapsed. Then attached that line back to the pump and use the pump to push the oil out of the other cylinder by rotating the plow

    2) How do you get air out of the angle cylinders? I cycled the cylinders back and forth about 10 times. One cylinder responds right away, the other sounds like it has an air pocket due to a delay. I left the cylinder collapsed over night, and I'm hoping that helps the air work its way out of the line.

    3) Filters, What should you look for in the filters to determine if you have problems? Both my filters were clean, but I replaced them because I ad a new set, and one has a slight twist to it.

    I will say removing the oil from the cylinders can be pretty messy! I used an old plastic grocery bag with a rubber band to keep the fluid from flying all over the garage. learned that after pushing the oil out of the first one :angry:

    Thanks in advance for your input!
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2004
  3. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    If you have access to filters I would suggest you change them while it is apart as most people do not even bother. If it is a Fisher/Western unit you can adda return filter as well if it does not have one already. WHen I bleed air out of angle rams I do it by aiming truck down hill so air goes to back of cylinders. One more tip if you are so inclinded. Pull your motor and blow of the dirt in it from brushes and check them too while you are at it and relube the armature bushings as they tend to go dry in older motors that have seen high usage and cause slowdown of motor and eventual failure.
     
  4. Plowlikehell

    Plowlikehell Member
    Messages: 73

    Thanks for the exta tip!

    I have a ST-78 plow, and E47 pump. Any tips for that setup?
     
  5. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    None other than pulling the motor and inspecting it as mentioned above. There is real very little that wear out in a motor and if you keep good brushes in them and check lube in them every now and them, they should last the life of the plow. A internal visual inspection of motor will reveal any potentail problems before they get bad enough to cause a failure.
     
  6. Plowlikehell

    Plowlikehell Member
    Messages: 73

    Thanks! I'll take a look at that today :drinkup:
     
  7. Big Nate's Plowing

    Big Nate's Plowing PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    to be honest I wouldnt mess with the motor, thats just asking for a whole can of worms to be opened, I have snapped alot of motor bolts on e-47's

    the bushings on these motors are a oil impregnated bronze bushing and do not need to be lubed

    plus if you dont have a brush tool then you will have to make one to reinstall the armature into the motor after you "lube" the bushings
     
  8. Tarkus

    Tarkus PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,113

    Not so. They are only a can or worms if you make them and they are greased a bit from factory as even with bronze bushings they will fail quicker without grease than with it. What little "oil' there is in the bushings cooks out with use and needs to be replaced unless you just want to replace motor prematurely. A little extra PM will yeild a look of extra life too. There is nothing difficult about dismantling a motor and putting it back together unless you are not very mechanically inclined and it lets you see the condition of motor and a early warning of potenail problems unless you like surprizes at 3AM when it is snowing and you would like it to work. I never replace starter or pump motors or altenator. I always repair them when needed and field strip all the hardware with my pump every few years for inspection. I have been doing this for over 20 years so I have some experiance to draw from too.
     
  9. Plowlikehell

    Plowlikehell Member
    Messages: 73

    One more question......

    When did the hydraulic fluid change from a clear to a blue (smurf wizz)? When I changed my fluid, it was clear. I replaced it with blue fluid from Angelo's.

    Any benefits from them adding the blue dye into the fluid?
     
  10. lawnmedic

    lawnmedic Senior Member
    Messages: 703

    I flush the angle rams by parking with the truck nose down hill, raising the blade until it just clears the ground, disconnecting the quick connects from the ends of the hoses and slowly pushing the blade back and forth by hand. Once all the oil is out I place the ends of the hoses into a jug of naphtha and continue moving the blade back and forth several times to flush any contaminates out of the rams. Then remove the hoses from the jug and raise the plow all the way up. Again angle the plow by hand until all fluid is out of the rams, then drop plow to just off the ground again, replace the quick connects and reattach to pump.(Pump should also be flushed now) Operate blade angling to refill rams, keep an eye on fluid level....This should only take 5-10 minutes and I do it immediately after flushing the pump.....
     
  11. Robhollar

    Robhollar Senior Member
    Messages: 766

    I spent 45 bucks and bought a brand new spare motor. I can have that motor swapped out - out in the field in about 5-10 mins tops. Id rather do that then take the motor apart, Ive been there and it never seems to last. Alot of times the amature will be messed up when the brush's go bad. Its just not worth it imop....Rob