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Pivot pin tube size

Discussion in 'Meyer / Diamond Products Discussion' started by greywynd, Oct 31, 2010.

  1. greywynd

    greywynd PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,343

    Working on fixing up an older Meyers, it had been bought, used once or twice, and left sitting for years. Everything is like new, except rusted/frozen solid, especially the pivot pins. the nearest Meyers dealer for parts is over an hour away, in a direction I rarely travel. Can anyone tell me the stock dimensions so I can buy material and make them? They look to be about 7/8" for the pins, and about 1 1/4" OD for the tubes, and 7/8" ID. Sound about right, or am I missing something?
     
  2. festerw

    festerw Senior Member
    Messages: 986

  3. greywynd

    greywynd PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,343

    I've read a lot on their site already, very informative. Unfortunately I've found that when ordering from south of the border, the customs and brokerage fees make it prohibitively expensive, and therefore I try to avoid it. Besides, I have a steel lathe, welder, and all the rest of the gear here to fabricate this stuff, was just wanting to keep it 'matching' original in case purchased parts are used down the road.

    I'll likely just measure up a little closer tomorrow, and if nothing is available in tubing, I'll buy solid and drill them to suit.
     
  4. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    1 1/4" O.D. x 15/16" I.D. x 3 1/2" long but they're not extremely fussy.
     
  5. Kenyou

    Kenyou Senior Member
    Messages: 375

    Meyer has new pins that have a grease zerk in one end so that it can be greased often.
    The problem that I have is that it has a bad system and will not let the grease go from one
    end to the other. I think the metal in the tube is quite thin to drill and tap, but if you could
    make your own, I would try to put a couple zerks in the tubes instead of the pins
    so that the grease can get moved around better. The inside of the pin does not need
    any grease.
    I still take mine apart and grease them properly even though I have the greaseable ones.

    Good Luck and let us know how you make out. Pictures would be GREAT!
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2010
  6. greywynd

    greywynd PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,343

    I was planning on adding grease nipples to the tubes on both sides in the tubing. The reason that Meyers have added it to the pins is that it is the only 'easily' replaceable part that they can upgrade to get grease into both sides. A well greased pin with a hole through it will still be stronger than one without grease that gets worn badly.

    This plow was so badly seized that I had to heat the plow tubes red hot, then use a sledge on the top of the moldboard to get it to pivot. Even then I don't think I got it to fold down fully. The half in the sector I never even tried, I just did the sawzall cut through the pins.

    So I'm guessing the pins are supposed to be 7/8" and the tube 15/16" to give about 1/16" clearance for the grease?
     
  7. JCByrd24

    JCByrd24 Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 232

    Yes you want some clearance for grease and to prevent the seizing you have experienced. I'd guess 1-1/4" OD x 1" ID might be easier to find, that would probably work too. A hint on adding grease nipples, this is what I did. I found zerks in 1/4-24 threads (UNF) at the local hardware store and so I just bought a 1/4"-24 nut, drilled a hole in the tube, then welded the nut centered on the hole and threaded in the zerk, works great. I also added a "handle" to the pin so that I can pull it out easier or just pull the cotter and give it a couple twists to make sure it's free from both moldboard and sector.
     
  8. greywynd

    greywynd PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,343

    I got some 7/8" for pins, and some 1-1/4" for the bushings. I'll cut them to length (maybe get back at this project tomorrow, got onto one of the trucks today) and drill them to 15/16" in the lathe.

    I've done the grease nipple trick before, a lot of the stuff I work on has metric fittings, so a 10mm nut and fitting will also work. I've also done the same thing using NPT grease fittings and the appropriate pipe hardware, sometimes it works better, as you have more distance between the weld area and the thread, less damage to the threads from too much heat.

    I hadn't thought of a handle, but it's a good idea, a clearance hole for the cotter pin, longer pin, and even a piece of 2-3" long round stock or similar welded on would work. Done right, it would also give a spot to catch with a bar or punch to help if the pin is starting to stiffen up next round. Thanks for that idea!!
     
  9. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    There's no need for a handle if you install a grease fitting in all four tubes and keep them greased. Done so the pins will push right out when needed in the future with access from the inside hole and a long thin punch.
     
  10. greywynd

    greywynd PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,343

    I realize that B&B, but the holes in the sector don't line up real well. I figure that having an easy way to remove them will make it such that they will get pulled from time to time and checked for grease etc.
    Another thing on this one is that this moldboard only has two trip springs right now, but going to add a third one in the centre.
     
  11. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    The problem with the handles is they'll tear the cotter/retainer pins out as they move around. Been there done that many moons ago...so just attempting to save you the grief. :waving:
     
  12. greywynd

    greywynd PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,343

    Hmmm, hadn't thought about that. I could see it happening though!
     
  13. JCByrd24

    JCByrd24 Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 232

    I guess I'm not quite following. Are you saying the pivot pin will shear the cotter pin? I guess I can see that happening now that I have my cotter through the pivot pin if there was enough friction, but last year it was not a problem (personal use). Those are pretty big (and brand new) cotter pins and it just forces the pivot to happen in the moldboard tube I guess. I will have to keep an eye on it.
     
  14. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    The add on "handle" yes. It only takes a matter of time using the cotter pin to force the pivot pin to pivot in the sector before it takes it out. Several good hard returns from the tripped position is enough in fact. Tried a bolt and nut deal replacing the cotter...took it out as well.
     
  15. welded wrenches

    welded wrenches Senior Member
    Messages: 177

    pins tubes cotter pins grease....yehaaww

    wow..oh hey...i skipped on the cotter pins..i used 1/4 inch bolts with 3 nuts on each bolt ..but still being loose enough to spin the bolt freelly after tightning the 1/4 inch bolts... and i skipped the grease....i used red hi-temp RTV Silocone and packed the tubes and pin full of this rtv... huh, all that grease and all that grit and road grime (sand) acts like 3 grit sand paper and just sands/grinds off them pins and tubes,makes them wear out quickly..road grime dont stick to rtv silicone....replies welcome....
     
  16. JCByrd24

    JCByrd24 Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 232

    Sounds like I'm on borrowed time, luckily don't trip much in my driveway or the neighbors, and I also added a third spring this fall so expect it will be even less, was really only trippng when stacking anyway. Thanks for the advice on trying to "upgrade" to a nut and bolt, I will skip that step :) And you are right, it was forcing pivot in sector not moldboard tube. B&B is wise!!
     
  17. dlcs

    dlcs 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,149

    I was thinking of replacing mine on my Cp-8. Funny thing is mine are loose, like the pins are really worn, not froze up. I can barely trip the blade and see the pin flex sideways in the tubes. I guess loose is better than tight but can they be too loose? What I'm asking is do the pins or tubes get to where they are worn enoguh to replace?
     
  18. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Sure do. The pins wear and the tubes increase in diameter from use which usually you find the moldboard "lays back" further than it should necessitating replacement of the pins or pins and tubes both. Nice when they're loose instead of frozen though at replacement time, makes the job less labor intensive. :drinkup:
     
  19. dlcs

    dlcs 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,149


    So should I just replace the pins or the tubes too? My moldboard is still standing where it should be and doesn't lay back too far. I'm thinking about putting zerks in the tubes instead of using the greasable pins. The pins that are in now are greasable but will not take any grease.
     
  20. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Once you have it apart you'll be able to tell if it needs the tubes replaced also by how sloppy new pins fit in them.You should have a little play of course but if it's excessive then it's time for replacement tubes as well.

    Grease fittings are always a good idea.