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Okay, noob (sort of) here. Question about roof shoveling.

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by Idaho Cowboy, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. Idaho Cowboy

    Idaho Cowboy Junior Member
    Messages: 25

    Noob to doing it for a side business. But, laid off right now and need money and the snow is coming fast and hard. So here I am.

    I am not new to snow. I don't need advice on that aspect. Thanks ahead of time. Thumbs Up

    Just wondering what an average price for roof shoveling is? I realize prices will vary all over the country. I'll take the average of the answers I get to get me in the ball park. I am in N. Idaho, Priest River area.

    A little about me, I have never paid anyone to move my snow. I have a '65 International R190 single axle dump with a 10' highway plow on it I use to keep my private road clear. I also have a skidsteer I use for everything else. I have cleared my own roofs, but never anyone elses, and never charged anyone or paid anyone. Clueless there. :p

    Thanks for the replies ahead of time!
     
  2. wilkie

    wilkie Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    call a few people in your area that do it and try to get some prices.
     
  3. Idaho Cowboy

    Idaho Cowboy Junior Member
    Messages: 25

    That's too easy! :drinkup:
     
  4. wilkie

    wilkie Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    ok I don't shovel roofs but I have done My own previously and helped others. I would think there would be a lot of variables to consider in pricing this unless there is a lot of competition in which case it ends up being a flat rate. but I would consider the Pitch of the roof, how high off the ground type/condition of snow fluffy hard packed etc. and if there is ice under it. If I was going to do this those are the factors I would look at before pricing but I could be way off base??
     
  5. Idaho Cowboy

    Idaho Cowboy Junior Member
    Messages: 25

    No, you are right on. I wouldn't be concerned with roofs over a 6:12 pitch. Too dangerous to walk on anyway. 2nd story or higher definitely a challenge.

    Hard pack, wet snow is the tough stuff.
     
  6. drp

    drp Senior Member
    from ontario
    Messages: 170

    By the hour was how I did it with a 3 hr minimum.
     
  7. BossPlow2010

    BossPlow2010 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,032

    How do you get snow off of a big roof such as a walmart or HD? Is a roof strong enough to hold a skid steer? And where do you put it after that?
     
  8. danocheese

    danocheese Junior Member
    from midwest
    Messages: 5

    use a snow blower on flat roofs. You may have to blow the same snow a few times. LAst year we ahd a bank in town that had to be shovled frequently as the roof would settle and the doors would not open. Not a good thing for a bank.
     
  9. wilkie

    wilkie Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    ... Clean up isle 4, 5 and 6...

    Depends on the construction of the roof maybe a small one. but not necessarily with the weight of all the snow on it. I have seen machines on a large roof before to move the stone around so I guess some must be.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2010
  10. BossPlow2010

    BossPlow2010 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,032

    What's the most snowblowers you guys have used to clear larger roofs? Like walmart or an automotive factory or even a warehouse?
     
  11. wilkie

    wilkie Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    I've never done a flat roof. Like I said I just did my own house and helped out others doing cottages etc.
    Not sure if i would want to do a flat roof to much could happen. damage to roof, someone falls off liability of what gets thrown/ blown/ pushed off. Safety regs to work up there etc. way to much to worry about.

    I would think that unless you had a high reach lift truck that could lift the blowers up and down you would want to put then up and leave them up all winter. grab a shed from HD and bolt it to the roof.

    I can't say as I have ever seen one get cleaned off up here.
     
  12. cotter

    cotter Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 182

    Insurance, insurance, insurance.
    For you.
    And for them.
     
  13. Idaho Cowboy

    Idaho Cowboy Junior Member
    Messages: 25

    flat roofs like wal marts require crews. It is not a one person job. You are looking at clearing over an acre of snow, especially with a supercenter.

    The way they do it here, is the crew gets up there with walk behind blowers and wheelbarrows and shovels. Work their ass off for an entire day, and hope it doesn't snow again for a few days.

    Insurance is mandatory, Walmart will require proof anyway. But hit something with the blower and you are going to be fixing it anyway.

    I would not take on a walmart type building without a good crew. A fairly big one at that.
     
  14. Idaho Cowboy

    Idaho Cowboy Junior Member
    Messages: 25

    We had an ACE nearby where the roof collapsed a few years back. Bad deal. I don't know that they bother with the wal marts unless it is really getting deep and heavy. The roof is usually engineered for the weight.
     
  15. Exact Services

    Exact Services Senior Member
    Messages: 198

    Unless you have outstanding connections that will yeild huge $.. I would personally avoid clearing snow on flat roofs. I have the Honda track drive 1132 and this would be a great blower on a flat roof since it throws snow a fairly good distance. For residential roofs I have used to older toro powelite blowers. Start at the crest aim chut forward and push it downward..drag it back up to crest repeat. I will never clear snow on a residential roof ever again with out one. Advantage is that snow is also thrown a better distance past the drip line of the roof..fewer complaints about damage to landscaping etc...less accumulation on walks etc. The newer toro 180 weighs a bit more but still would be a good choice. The older units are super handy and only weigh 40#.

    A big blower like a my Honda 1132 can tear up many a roof vent and damages could add up quickly. The best way to approach this is sell roof clearing coverage pre-season with an upfront retainer that includes a limited amount of snow or a flat rate seasonal.

    Anyhow...if your a Guy with a shovels and some ladders ...the lowest price Guy gets the job here. 2 kids with shovels will do a roof here for $40-$60 for an average residential ...so my point is why bother. I will not compete with that...I will stick with residential driveways ...much easier to deal with.
     
  16. Idaho Cowboy

    Idaho Cowboy Junior Member
    Messages: 25

    Couldn't agree more. I'm not going to compete with some starving teen with no bills still living at mommy's house.


    Interesting idea on using a blower on a res. roof. They don't destroy shingles?
     
  17. peterng

    peterng Senior Member
    Messages: 249

    "Anyhow...if your a Guy with a shovels and some ladders ...the lowest price Guy gets the job here. 2 kids with shovels will do a roof here for $40-$60 for an average residential ...so my point is why bother. I will not compete with that...I will stick with residential driveways ...much easier to deal with. "

    Yeah but it's a good service to offer. Once every 3 years we get a mother of a dump and roof clearing goes premium.
     
  18. Before you even attempt this as part of an operation, be sure to check with your Insurance Co and make sure you are covered. Highly doubt this is covered by the average lawn maintenance and snow removal GL policy or for that matter a workmans comp policy if you are in landscape/snow biz. No market for it around here for those in our trade anyway, as this is handled mostly by the roofing contractors. I wouldn't do it anyway, doesnt offer much in the way of Risk (liability etc) vs. Reward (profit), not to mention I cant afford to lose one of my employees due to fall off an icy roof.
     
  19. Idaho Cowboy

    Idaho Cowboy Junior Member
    Messages: 25

    The risk of being on a roof is definitely a concern. I don't even like being on a roof in the dry summer time. Nevermind ice and snow. I've fallen off them too many times.

    But if helps keep the bills paid and the kids fed...... I'll do what I have to.
     
  20. Cowboy, just make sure your covered by your insurance prior to doing it. Can understand completely the need to make the $, just would hate to see it bite ya in the azz later. best of luck and happy holidays.