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oil spraying

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by OBRYANMAINT, Dec 2, 2001.

  1. OBRYANMAINT

    OBRYANMAINT PlowSite.com Veteran
    from ohio
    Messages: 534

    does any one see anything wrong with oil spraying a brand new truck?

    i have always oil sprayed all other trucks to pervent rust but i am picking up a new 2002 one next week and because of even more electronic and rubber components i find myself second guessing the practice, my next newest truck is a 97 with no ill effects

    all chevies?
     
  2. crew

    crew Junior Member
    Messages: 24

    What exactly does it mean to oil spray a truck??
     
  3. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    Some people spray the bottom of the truck with oil to coat all the surfaces and to prevent rust. I do not really do this because I usually trade in trucks after 4 years or so. On my older Toyota I just blasted and repainted the frame.

    I think it all depends on how long you want to keep the truck and what you expect or want to get for it when you trade or sell it. Mine are a dealer lease so I don't really care about it.
     
  4. ScottyB.

    ScottyB. Member
    Messages: 55

    Please explain how to oil spray a truck.
    My '86 F250 has a great looking body and I was told the previous owner oil sprayed it each fall. I would keep this up if I new what it involved because it obviously paid off. The wheel wells and fenders are solid as a rock.
    ScottyB.
     
  5. OBRYANMAINT

    OBRYANMAINT PlowSite.com Veteran
    from ohio
    Messages: 534

    you take some motor oil used or new, and basically spray the whole thing...primarily the underneath and inside body panels....i use an old paint sprayer with a long tip to get into hard to see areas

    i have no doubt it works for me but a bit concerned about the oil degrading rubber and electrical parts

    i will probably go ahead
     
  6. 75

    75 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,382

    I would tend to suggest NOT spraying used motor oil onto your truck - used oil likely will have a bit of "acid content" which is kind of defeats the purpose of spraying it on in the first place!

    There are products made specifically for rustproofing (I have heard the name "Durashield" around here, not sure about other areas) which are a better choice than engine oil IMO. Most oil-change shops should offer this service, that way the mess is in their shop not yours!!
     
  7. newtosnow

    newtosnow Junior Member
    Messages: 17

    I use sae 30 (new, fresh, warm), and acetone mix to make it flow better in the sprayer. I try to do just the frame, and floorboards, and whatever may travel is ok, but Id try to be careful, it makes a heck of a mess. Id use Bondtite (I think it is, at VIP)paintable undercoating. It actually stays on, unlike other coatings, and is a lot less messy than oil. Its about $5 for a big can. It hardens like truckbed coating. Take it easy good luck happy plowing may god let it snow!!
     
  8. BATTLIN_BLAZES

    BATTLIN_BLAZES Member
    Messages: 82

    just a thought, i think im going to try this in my truck a guy i work with uses 50%linseed oil and 50% penatrol(penatrol is found in most metal paints as a rust inhibator)from the looks of his 88' chevy i was sold he sprayed it once when it was new and hasnt touched it since 13 winters later his truck is pretty clean some surface rust showing but looks great underneath..it dries hard and pretty clear in 2 to 3 days...he says the penatrol can be purchased from most paint shops..anyone ever hear of or try this it was all new to me but looks like it works?



    rich
     
  9. Plow Meister

    Plow Meister PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,174

    Since you just bought a new Chevy it won't be long before your truck sprays oil all by itself. I suggest you wait until then and let the truck do the work.

    :D
     
  10. BATTLIN_BLAZES

    BATTLIN_BLAZES Member
    Messages: 82

    lmao plowmeister and this comment coming from a guy with a dodge?:D
     
  11. thelawnguy

    thelawnguy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,011

    My 95 Dodge is TOO oil-tight. I had a valve cover with pinholes due to rust. Besides that no oil spots whatsoever even after 72k.
     
  12. Plow Meister

    Plow Meister PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,174

    I have 3 GM's also. I just don't list them. I am more proud of the Ford and Dodge as they are my newer trucks. All my GM's leak a bit. My ford burns no oil what so ever and my Dodge isn't broken in enough to start leaking (only 3500 miles).

    Chevy's are o.k. Just not my bag. I prefer Ford Super Duties. Even the brand new Chevy HD's don't have the front suspension for snowplowing. They have plenty of power but they choose an awkward way of sending that power to the wheels.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  13. plowking35

    plowking35 2000 Club Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 2,923

    I have seen way more fords leak oil than GM's. Just look in the ford forum under oil pans. They have a whole thread dedicated to replacing oil pans on trucks less than 5 yrs old.
    And while you think that Gm front end isnt up to plowing, they can carry bigger plows than the big bad super duty 250and 350.
    As for getting power to the ground, Gm has the best auto trannies of the big 3, so that argument is strange at best.
    Dino
     
  14. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    What the suits at Chevy, Ford, Dodge and Fisher and other companies rate the trucks for and what the desginers actually design them for are two different things. I have seen many trucks with oversized plows on them. Most have handled the weight fine. I say this as a Ford lover. I know Chevies can handle the plow. It is the low ground clearance among other things that bothers me with the Chevy.

    I have never had an oil leak from a diesel or from my Toyotas:D
     
  15. JD PLOWER

    JD PLOWER PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 751

    Unfortunatley I've had extensive eperience in oil leaks and I can say that its not brand specific problem as outlined below-
    Buick- leaked like a stuck pig.
    Corvette- bad rear main.
    Camaro- rear main, valve covers and finally head gaskets.
    Volvo- rear main, and turbo.
    97 Diesel- rear main (under warranty) thank God!!!


    As CT said, the only cars I've owned that NEVER DROPED A SINGLE SPECK OF OIL ....you guessed it Toyota, and Honda
    :D
     
  16. plowking35

    plowking35 2000 Club Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 2,923

    I dont understand the ground clearance issue. My truck is about as low as one can get with a 4wd truck. And I have never been remotely close to being stuck. I have pulled a few tall fords out of the snow tho.
    Unless you are doing rock crawling, I dont see ground clearance as an issue. And if you run lets say P235/85/16 on a ford and I run the same tire on a GM we have the exact same ground clearance at the differentials. So the height of the frame is moot point.
    Dino
     
  17. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    It is not the ground clearance of the truck so much as it is the plow hanging off the front of the low truck. Case in point. Town of Brookfield two dumps one 3500 454 Chevy 4x4 and one F350 4x4 diesel. Both mid 90's. Both have Fisher 9 foot MM blades set exactley the same. They actually lost track of which originally went on which. Both also have similiar dumps and stainless air flo (I think) sanders. I think it can be said they are similiarily set up.

    When the Chevy's plow is lifted all the way up the front end droops and when angled and sitting still the plow is only an inch off the ground at the low side. Driving down the road it often scrapes.

    The Ford on the other hand barely sags with the plow up and has ample clearance even when going down a bumpy road. Why is this?

    I think it is because the Ford starts out higher and has a stiffer front end. The one thing that the workers hae told me is that they like the Chevy in the summer because the "softer" front end gives a little better ride. Of course the 454 mileage is awful not that town employees care. They also say that the Ford is much better at handling a trailer not just pulling but stopping. This is what I have been told from a direct comparision of the two.
     
  18. plowking35

    plowking35 2000 Club Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 2,923

    I am sure that the torsion bars have never been touched. Mine did the same thing till I adjusted them for the plow. Next on the 3500 cab and chassis, Gm installed front a arms that lower the ride height. Why, I dont know, but if I park next to a 3500 pick up, I sit about 3" lower. What this translates to a truck that is easier to work out of, my load height in the rear of my dump body is about the same as a pick up. I like it that way, but to each his own.
    If they turned the bars up, and added load boosters, that truck would handle the plow alot better. My front end only drops about a 1/2" with the 8.5' mvp.
    Dino
     
  19. Plow Meister

    Plow Meister PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,174

    I really didn't mean to start a huge debate on the dreaded Chevy / Ford / Dodge saga. Personally, I think they are all great trucks. I believe that if you compare apples to apples (Ford 250SD, Chevy 2500HD, Dodge 2500) you will note that all have very similar characteristics. All are rated nearly the same. All have nearly the same horsepower and torque. All have nearly the same cargo capacity and dimentions. The main difference I see is in the front suspension. The Chevy uses independant front suspension with torsion bars as springs whereas both Dodge and Ford use a solid front axle. When you look at the bumpstops on the Chevy, the lower A arms are nearly touching the bumpstops. Now, lets add a 1,000# hunk of steel 6 feet in front of the front axle and watch what happens. The A arms are now riding on the bumpstops. If we take this senario a bit further... when that truck is heading down the road at a respectable speed of 40 miles per hour with the blade up and the truck hits a good size bump in the road, gravity tries to force the front end down even more but it can't go anywhere due to the bumpstops. To make matters worse, new Chevy's are unable to 'tweak' the front torsion bars to gain added clearance. Therefore you are forced to either live with the situation or invest more money in airbags or something else of that nature.

    Sorry for the long post. Again, I have nothing against new Chevy's. I have installed about 25 blades on 2001's and 2002's. The front suspension is built for comfort, not work.
     
  20. Plow Meister

    Plow Meister PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,174

    Plowking,

    And for the power distribution issue on the Chevy's, I was not refering to the transmission. I was talking about the independant front suspension and front differential. I know that Allison makes fantastic trannies. Just don't forget that it is still a 'new product' and it still has a lot of prooving to do.