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Off season pump

Discussion in 'Residential Snow Removal' started by ppkgmsy, Apr 7, 2008.

  1. ppkgmsy

    ppkgmsy Member
    from Vermont
    Messages: 73

    Hello All,

    Plowed for the first time this winter with my 87 Chevy. Thanks to all of you for the guidance and various tips. Things went great, in large part to some of the pointers I picked up from you. I'm starting to figure (hope, anyway), that plowing season is about done here in VT. This summer I'll be painting the plow and, after reading the various opinions, I'll likely change the fluid in the system. I'm wondering, however, if there would be value in removing the belt from the pump? Seems like it would simply reduce additional wear on the pump pulley, since it wouldn't have to spin at all. Does anyone have any advice about this idea.

    Thanks again.
     
  2. Krieger91

    Krieger91 Senior Member
    Messages: 353

    I don't know if that would work...

    If your pump system's like mine, then removing the belt would cause other issues because, I think the belt on my systems is the serpentine belt, but longer to go around the hydraulic pump...

    Not sure, just a guess.
     
  3. ppkgmsy

    ppkgmsy Member
    from Vermont
    Messages: 73

    Thanks, Krieger, but my belt set-up is different. The serpantine runs the alternater, the radiator fan, and the air conditioning unit (which is removed). A seprate belt runs the power steering pump, which has a dual pulley from which another belt runs the plow pump. I can easily remove the pump belt. It's mounted in a way which makes it somewhat hard to establish belt tension, so I'm content leaving it on, unless it's worth the work as a way to extend the life of the plow pump and, I guess, maybe the belt too.
     
  4. tvpierce

    tvpierce Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 209

    It's considered standard operating proceedure to remove the belt in the off-season -- Fisher recommends it. As you mention -- it saves wear on the pump.

    As far as tension: On Fisher pumps, the shaft (that the pully spins) is offset, it's not centered in the pump. So to adjust tension, you just loosen the band around the pump, and physically rotate the whole pump body by hand. One way will increase tension, the other will ease tension. It should be enough to remove the belt.

    Good luck.

    jp
     
  5. ppkgmsy

    ppkgmsy Member
    from Vermont
    Messages: 73

    Thanks, tvpierce. The weather is so good here now that I'm working on firewood, soon as I get tired of stacking I'll take a break and pull the belt. I'm not sure my set-up is the same. I replaced the pump once, and it's held in place by what is basically a big clamp, in which the pump slides in and out, attached to a bracket . The tension is adjusted by sliding the bracket, similar to the way you'd adjust tension on an alternator belt. I'll double check because I hope you're right, make the job easier when I re-install, Also, you seem to know your stuff, I changed the fluid last year when I replaced the pump. Do you think it's valuable to change it again? Thanks very much.
     
  6. Niteman9

    Niteman9 Senior Member
    Messages: 165

    Just my opinion but I don't think it is necessary to change the fluid every year with the pumps under the hood. But is not hard to do and cheap so you decide.

    With the newer plows which have the pumps and reservoirs out in the weather all the time it is more important to change the fluid frequently.

    My truck doesn't get driven to much other than plowing so I don't remove the belt either. I have averaged 1,000 mile a year for the last ten years with this truck.
     
  7. tvpierce

    tvpierce Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 209

    I agree. If I plowed professionally with mine, I would definately flush the fluid every year. With my extremely limited use (2 driveways) I flush it every other year and sleep well knowing that even that is overkill.
     
  8. ppkgmsy

    ppkgmsy Member
    from Vermont
    Messages: 73

    Thanks, everyone, for the advice. It's a simple job, so I'm pulling the belt off. I only use the truck for plowing, firewood, and hauling stuff too big for the family car. Mileage amounts to about 1000 miles a year, so it sounds like I can save the work of flushing the fluid.