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Newbie Needing Some advice

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by ihscoutlover, Feb 3, 2014.

  1. ihscoutlover

    ihscoutlover Junior Member
    Messages: 21

    Thanks for the interesting readings. I am going out on a limb here, but I feel I am getting some help by asking since the only dumb question is the one not asked. I own several International Scouts and Pickups. I am acquiring the parts necessary to equip 1 Scout and 1 Pickup for plowing. The Scout setup is going to be a Meyer, while the Pickup will be a Western. I have some questions regarding some of the equipment, which I may have to take to a different forum, but that is ok. My Cousins used to do this for a winter living when not doing construction work. They advised me that it should be done with a 3/4 ton minimum, 1 ton preferred. My Scout has 3/4 ton running gear. My Pickup is already 3/4, but has 1 ton running gear. I have been working as a sub driving mostly a 1/2 ton, which does ok, but it seems like the owner doesn't really have a clue when it comes to several aspects of snow removal(not that I am an expert, but from pure common sense things are not really rocket science either). I am wanting to be a sub with my own equipment, which out of my pocket to date is not really much, or start my own either driveway or lot removal business. The end result is I run and drive my stuff, and am responsible for its repair and maintenance. I would use the salt(if I spread any), from whomever hires me unless I have to buy it on my own, I am concentrating more on just moving the snow, I'd leave the option for salting later(if I can procure that equipment). Plan is to use these trucks only for plowing, they would be either idle during the off-season, or be used for parts runs, or backups for my DDs on a as needed basis. End result is to have these trucks for when I move to CO, I can clear my driveway and any of the neighbors as needed only, unless I find work out there as a sub. I am open for criticism, and advice. I can provide more details as needed, but this is my business plan for the moment. Thoughts or advice here??

    Jeff
     
  2. MattR

    MattR Senior Member
    Messages: 218

    A bit tired to go into too much detail about the other things. Yet curious as to why the 2 different brands of plows? Reason I ask is because most try to stick with one brand so that way you do not have to purchase so many spare parts.
     
  3. BossPlowMaster

    BossPlowMaster Senior Member
    Messages: 203

    I guess I don't really see a clear question in either of these posts....what exactly are you trying to ask???
     
  4. MattR

    MattR Senior Member
    Messages: 218

    ihscoutlover is asking for thoughts and advice on the business plan.
     
  5. ihscoutlover

    ihscoutlover Junior Member
    Messages: 21

    I have two different setups because at this time that was all I was able to locate for my two trucks. The Meyer setup is complete less the pump. The Western is minus the blade and A frame. I am working on some frame reinforcements for the Meyer truck. I also agree to really go with one brand vs the other, but at this time the prices are cheap. I am more with should I just get experience then go my own way, or what? Wife seems to think plowing insurance is expensive, and I'm still reading as well as checking with local insurance companies for pricing. She said I should save my equipment for family and friends and not really do any commercial stuff. Thoughts??
     
  6. MattR

    MattR Senior Member
    Messages: 218

    Majority of my plowing is residential customers, with the exception of the township I live in which I plow out the recycling center. All of my customers sign a disclaimer stating that I am not responsible for slip and falls because I do not offer sanding/salting. That was drawn up for me by a lawyer that handles my food concession legal stuff (summer work). As far as plowing insurance, my insurance never went up much since I was already paying for insurance in case some idiot chokes on some kettle corn. I think the increase was only about $100 a year. Hopefully somebody else can help answer the insurance stuff for you better.

    As far as experience, I started out without working for somebody and went on my own from the start. If you decide to try it on your own right away, just try to keep your plow route as close to home as you can. This way it not only cuts down on your driving time, it also makes it easier if you need to head back to home or the shop in case of parts/repair while on your route if something breaks.
     
  7. ihscoutlover

    ihscoutlover Junior Member
    Messages: 21

    I did talk to my LL who runs a tree service business. He indicated that the business insurance will cost about 1k per year. I was thinking of just doing residential. The guy I have been working for wants to try and sell me the 89 Ford 1/2 ton extended cab short bed truck with a Western plow. The truck has issues, but does the job till one of the other drivers mess it up, or the PM doesn't get done. Also the oil pressure gauge at idle reads like zip and he says its a bad sender, but he doesn't seem too concerned about fixing it. It would provide a newer truck, but its not the greatest, plus I'd likely put better tires on it as the all seasons suck. I am looking at ideas and input from several things between insurance and vehicles and plow setups and clientele. I can do this, and I figure it can help during the winter months when I'm on seasonal layoff from my full time job.

    Jeff