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New to plowing and considering purchase, advice welcome

Discussion in 'Residential Snow Removal' started by 421safari, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. 421safari

    421safari Junior Member
    from DE
    Messages: 6

    Hi,

    going to be moving to a new house this year where I will be obligated to keep a small stretch of road snow free. Don't know exact length of road, at least several hundred feet and maybe over 1000ft. My own property will also be several hundred square feet (that I need to clear).

    Also, due to several other reasons, I will be purchasing a 96-99 suburban k2500 somewhere in the coming months.

    Now, it doesn't snow here that often and in some winters not at all. But in other years we can have 10 or more inches of snow in a day.

    I'd rather not be shoveling all that then.. So I was looking at complementing the suburban with a (light) plow and maybe even help out some neighbours if I'm out there anyway ;)

    I've been reading and looking around a bit and as it will only be used incidentally I do not want to spend a lot of money on a big boy. So at the moment I am looking at a Snowsport HD or a Snowbear.

    However, as even a Snowsport is a considerable amount of money if I can get something a _lot_ better by spending $200 or $300 more.. When it has to be used it has to perform.

    Also, the new property is part gravel but a big part is nice pavement and I do not want to damage it. As far as I can tell the snowsport has a rubber cutting edge (safe?) but the snowbear as most others has a steel cutting edge (unsafe?). I don't want all kinds of scratches and scrapes on the pavement come summer..

    Last, as there are some tricky bits where maneuvering the suburban to push will not be simple or possible, back-dragging (scraping?) capability would be a boon.

    So, Snowsport or Snowbear? or another?

    Is it possible to get a rubber cutting edge for the Snowbear? Will rubber work even?

    Opinions and advice welcome!

    thanks
     
  2. the new boss 92

    the new boss 92 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,989

    what are you looking to spend on one? personaly i would not spend the money on the about said, thats just me but others might agree. i would look onto a a 7'6 western midweight ultamount. easy on easy off. you will be looking at 1500- 2000 with the plow brackets and wiring. look around as you can find a nicly used western or boss.
     
  3. quigleysiding

    quigleysiding PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,097

    It would be cheaper for you to just hire someone who knows how to plow and let them do it for you.If you don"t get much snow it will save you cash in the long run.
     
  4. 421safari

    421safari Junior Member
    from DE
    Messages: 6

    regarding spending, would not want to go too far over $1500.

    As for hiring, I would not know of any. They might be there, but over here (I'm not in the US) people just expect the authorities to keep everything clear. But of course they only do the main and lesser roads, not everybodies driveway and property. (and with weather as we are having the last weeks they are swamped and not even doing all lesser roads..)

    By far most (95%+) of the properties over here are also small enough that the driveway is just a short stretch doable by hand.

    My property will be relatively large and the road to it a very minor road the authorities definitely won't plow/sweep.

    A western is from I have gathered a more serious plow, so a nice used one might be good. Also a little more complicated with the hydraulics.

    Still leaves the question about the cutting edge, I am fearful steel will damage the pavement. On the video the rubber edged snowsport seems to do just fine, but of course its their video..

    I see western lists both rubber and back drag edges, but it does not say for which plows.

    Ultramount looks nice as well with the pivot, installation looks somewhat more involved but still not overly difficult.
     
  5. the new boss 92

    the new boss 92 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,989

    i thought i would just suggest it and being a home owner,(not all that inclined with wrenches and sutomotive electric) i thought it might be a good plow to suit your needs. remeber if you go cheap in the long may cost you more. i would look into just a midweight plow of some sort, as you are going to be plowing about 1000 feet of roads and then driveways. midweight would be perfect.
     
  6. quigleysiding

    quigleysiding PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,097

    the cutting edge won"t hurt the pavement
     
  7. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    My first advise would be advertise for some one to plow. Let them know your needs as far as getting to work. Come to an agreement on the "trigger" (minimum depth to plow) and billing interval.

    Second (if not wanting to hire someone) look into a Fisher Homesteader (Western makes a similar plow but can't remember what they call it). This is a "homeowner" type plow and not meant to be used commercially. But they have hydraulics.

    If you go for a plow without hydraulics, really make sure you're ok with its limitations.
     
  8. 421safari

    421safari Junior Member
    from DE
    Messages: 6

    well, if I did not want suggestions I would not have posted ;) so thanks!

    And I agree that with roughly $1500 for a new snowsport, if I can find a used western that would be more push for the buck.

    Also, one reason I am moving to the new house is the more room it provides for (a lift for) my hobby cars. so not entirely un-inclined with wrenches and electrics. But I am rather wrenches on something nice than on something that needs to do its job and isnt ;)

    The one thing I do not want is spending good money on a cheaper plow and then when it needs to be used find out it really is not up to the task.
     
  9. quigleysiding

    quigleysiding PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,097

    Find a good dealer who is close to you so if you need service they will be close,Don"t get something to small for the job.If you need to hire someone to plow for you go to networking on this site and there will be someone in your area.
     
  10. 421safari

    421safari Junior Member
    from DE
    Messages: 6

    There really aren't that many plows for hire over here. Authorities do everything, and what they don't do mainly doesn't get done.

    To illustrate:

    - Currently I live in a small village and this street does not get plowed/sweeped or salted. never. Curbs are not even sweeped! We have already quite some snow and if tonight we would get another 10 inches it would be havoc tomorrow morning. The entire street would be late for work, first digging out the cars, then sliding towards work.

    - I just checked on one of the biggest national ad sites for plowing/sweeping services: there are less than 10 ads for the entire country. (and those are mostly farmers with an old tractor and a rusted plow)

    We just aren't geared towards a 'lot' of snow here. But we do get it from time to time. When we do and it is worse than usual everything comes crashing to a halt on the roads. Authorities advising people to stay indoors etc etc.

    In this house I can walk to dozens of neighbours, in the new house I am not completely isolated, but the walk is a good deal longer. Any kind of stores are a lot further even.

    So I'd rather be able to get out on my own ;)
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2010
  11. 421safari

    421safari Junior Member
    from DE
    Messages: 6

    Both dealers and forummembers here would be quite thin in my area I'd guess. Could be wrong though.

    I'm currently living in Holland, will be in Germany in a few months ;)
     
  12. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Ok. I (and maybe others) took it by your "location" that you're moving to Delaware and were giving advice for that. I gathered that you are currently not in the United States, though. So, scratch the advertising. I still stand by the advise on plows. The Western version is called "Suburbanite".
     
  13. 421safari

    421safari Junior Member
    from DE
    Messages: 6

    ahh, forgive my ignorance. For me "DE" is quite clearly meaning Germany (DEutschland) but I can certainly see how for you DElaware would be the more obvious interpretation.

    For my education, what are the limitations of a non-hydraulic plow? Just limited stacking/scraping ability, or is there more?
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2010
  14. quigleysiding

    quigleysiding PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,097

    Yes I thought you were in Delaware. Good luck with the new plow.
     
  15. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Plus - lifting is usually by a winch-type set-up. Angling is done manually by pulling a pin and "wrestling" the blade side to side. It's cold and a pain. Winch cables tend to break at unfortunate times. Their pretty light so may tend to ride up on the snow.
     
  16. the new boss 92

    the new boss 92 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,989

  17. Promotiondave

    Promotiondave Junior Member
    Messages: 3

    used a snowsport for the last 5 years as a back up and on gravel driveways, works great but has its limitations. you can only push snow ahead (no back drag) but very simple to use, works well and stands up tp a fair amount of abuse. Agri-cover is also a great company and really stands behind their products!!!
     
  18. adksnowo

    adksnowo Senior Member
    Messages: 370

    A 3/4 ton Suburban would crush a Snowbear or Snowsport.:p