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New to bussiness need advice on how to quote

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by TorontoTN, Sep 5, 2005.

  1. TorontoTN

    TorontoTN Junior Member
    from Toronto
    Messages: 13

    hey everybody whats going....i am from the toronto area and starting snowplowing bussiness this year after having worked for 3 years. I bought a 2000 GMC truck and still looking for a plow and salter. However, my worry is giving out estimates as i am no experienced in doing so. I hope somebody can help me out. Thanks ahead.
     
  2. TriCountySnow

    TriCountySnow Member
    Messages: 34

    Just Go For It

    Basically just go for it, there are couple ways to charge by the strom or by the push. Bid a little lower than the competion then after a year or two start to raise your prices, Make sure to take into consideration for gas/diesel prices now. Little tip here you really dont want to get into serious parking lots right yet. not sure about that area but here it is rather competetive, alot of guys out there lowballing estabishlished competition, and making no money at it. However if you want to make serious money go for it, get as many lots,drives,whatever as you can just beat them at there own game.
     
  3. OneBadDodge06

    OneBadDodge06 Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 735

    Good advice. I lost a couple of bids due to lowballing. If these guys wanna pay their customer to do their lots more power to them. With gas prices being astronomical sometimes there's no other choice. I won't be paying for higher liability insurance and the risk of no snow this winter. Another thing you can do is look around and see if anybody needs subs, that way you can get some sort of a paycheck.
     
  4. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    The problem with this, you are now the lowballer. Then after that couple of years as you start to raise prices, someone else comes in and bids a little lower then you. Think you can now keep the customers? How did you get them in the first place?
     
  5. RHarrah

    RHarrah Member
    Messages: 40

    You can start out as a lowballer or charge what you are worth from the start.

    Someone is always going to lowball you sooner or later. You can sell service or price. You can start out lowballing but I would NOT give them much more service than what they are paying for and do NOT expect to keep them as a customer long. They will always be the price shoppers of all industries (whether you are talking about snow plowing, landscaping, pest control or whatever service industry you want to talk about) and sooner or later you will get tired of working for pennies and want to earn a living.
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2005
  6. OneBadDodge06

    OneBadDodge06 Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 735

    Mick, what's your definition of a lowballer?
     
  7. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

  8. TriCountySnow

    TriCountySnow Member
    Messages: 34

    Lowballers

    Let me add a little bit to that, when i said bid a little lower i didnt mean to bid 20 dollars less, i meant like if you think that it is worth 50 dollars of work charge 45 just to get your feet wet then slow raise your rates on different jobs.

    Ex. Company in ohio here charged 35 dollars to do a drive, Larger company that works in same area came an charged 30 just 5 dollars made the difference.

    dont become the one company that is hated by the rest because you bid 20 dollars under, just bid a little bit lower and let them think whatever.

    Maybe im wrong on this or total of my rocker.