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New to Account bidding

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by 9.5hinvee, Jan 13, 2015.

  1. 9.5hinvee

    9.5hinvee Junior Member
    from Mn
    Messages: 15

    Not a newbie to the snow plowing industry, I have 10 seasons under my belt doing anything from residential drives/approaches, to large shopping centers/malls. I am however a newbie at pricing/estimating for snow removal. So, wanted to pick some brains, as I am investigating an account to pursue, and right now using this account as a starter basis as I know it well, and it is brand new, and if it was landed it would be a good account, to get in without cutting someone elses nuts right off the bat.

    It is a distribution center, to be bid for the 2015-2016 season, with 24 or 27 acres of plowable lot/drive entrances, (Depends on if they finish all the parking area right away or not.) Wide open, level dock entrances, open 24/7, 6 retaining ponds on site, at lot edges to push snow towards, (nothing in lot area for obstructions, not positive, but have not seen evidence of light poles YET either) there is a 454,000 sq foot building, and another truck repair shop in the lot, other than that straight forward and pretty much free of obstruction.

    That being said, it will be a demanding account, curb to curb spotless I am sure... Ice management, snow removal, and sidewalks, (although minimal and probably easily done with a skidder)

    I do not have a image of the lot as it is all still under construction, I do have a full sized print, however to large to scan into computer, could possibly redraw it out if necessary to post...

    I know I will get tons of all over the board responses, so to keep in a manner I can sort through the responses to make a judgement on whom may be in a similar market can you please include the area in which you are used to bidding these types of jobs.

    Yes, more than sufficient equipment is available to do this job, Most likely two large 380 horse 8 yd loaders, and 1 0r 2 230 horse, 4.5 yd machines. 2-3 two-speed skids, and 3 trucks, more available if needed.

    Lot is nice and flat, and 13" or poured crete with plenty rebar in it... So thoughts on setting up pushers,

    possibility...
    1-30' pusher
    1-18' (protech new steel edge caught my eye for hard pack)
    1-18' low pro angle for clearing under kingpins and wind-rowing

    Possibly ad more if needed, just think in a wide open lot this is good, also could do a second 30' or a 24'.... but something easier to move a very short distance job to job I thought would be beneficial...

    Two skids, most likely with 100" snow buckets for sidewalks and cleaning tight areas
    more available if needed

    2 vee plows (most likely ad wings for light pushes
    1 8' straight blade

    more trucks available if needed

    If they prefer to not have snow stacked, would consider adding a self contained blower unit to a loader, would prefer to go large enough to possibly do some municipal work (very real possibility to get in blowing very deep snow on county roads around here in the right year)

    Our area is a competative market, however we will not do this if it is not possible to make money... trucks seem to run 50-70 an hour in our area, just an idea of our market

    Insight on how to go about bidding this kind of job would be appreciated... Also, this is phase one of this distribution center, phase two presumably eventually will double the area... Also word of two other smaller distribution warehouses in the early stages of planning for this area... so not a bad area to get into I do not think. Also breakdown of salt vs. lot clearing would be helpful. Thank you.
     
  2. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    WOW this going be the first one you going try to bid on

    What equipment do you have now

    I think you might be over your head. I would start on smaller ones to get the feel on how to bid stuff
     
  3. beanz27

    beanz27 Senior Member
    Messages: 984

    Equipment alone renting would be 10k, hell of a first property.
     
  4. 9.5hinvee

    9.5hinvee Junior Member
    from Mn
    Messages: 15

    I'm not over my head, very aware of the snow removal aspect of this, but I have never bid work, This would be for the company I work for full time, a large underground contractor with the equipment, and lots of growth happening in our quarries, giving us a need for the loaders in the summertime, but leaving a few idle over winter... Idle equipment doesn't make money. So, this would be a good thing for the company, as well as myself... No equipment rentals will need to be made, and the push boxes and extras plows/skid buckets etc. will be purchased.
     
  5. beanz27

    beanz27 Senior Member
    Messages: 984

    Take a pretty large machine to push a 30' pusher.
     
  6. Flawless440

    Flawless440 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,543

    What dose their spec sheet call for?
    Are they requesting equipment on site?
    Usually somthing this size wants a seasonal price, what are they asking for? Per push or seasonal, per event??
     
  7. 9.5hinvee

    9.5hinvee Junior Member
    from Mn
    Messages: 15

    Going off of the specs for them they say 4.5yd+ machine, it would most likely have an 844 deere behind it. I think it would handle it fine, however not sure it wold do with a heavy wet blast, however this would be an account that needs plowed through the storms as well, have considered 24' pusher as well, however a big machine, we need to be getting optimal efficiency out of it, Like me vee plow, 95% pf the time, wings would be much more efficient if I wasn't currently paid by the hour...
     
  8. Flawless440

    Flawless440 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,543

    Great, you got the equipment....

    What dose the bid spec sheet call for? A seasonal price or what???
     
  9. 9.5hinvee

    9.5hinvee Junior Member
    from Mn
    Messages: 15

    They will want a seasonal bid. We will most likely leave 1 or 2 of the big loaders on site and the push boxes. If not, our shop within a 10-15 minute drive with a loader, only a couple miles, but it is up hill.
     
  10. 9.5hinvee

    9.5hinvee Junior Member
    from Mn
    Messages: 15

    Our average year is around 60" as well
     
  11. beanz27

    beanz27 Senior Member
    Messages: 984

    Well seems like you actually realize what it will take, I'll write a real response tonight
     
  12. Rc2505

    Rc2505 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,245

    Doesn't matter much in the size of the pusher unless the pushes are long. I currently do a 30 plus acre site, and the pushes are very long. There is a huge difference between 1 inch of fluffy snow and 1 inch of wet heavy snow. Also something to remember when your on sites this large, if you are plowing with the storm, then by the time the snow stops, you will have to plow at least half the lot again because somewhere still has fresh snow on it. I can do mine in about 5 hours with a 16 footer, a 12 footer, and 2 trucks. The sidewalk crew takes about 4 hours, but they have to a lot by hand. My place won't let equipment on the sidewalks. One last thing to think about is fire exits. My place has 42 sets of steps every 8 dock doors that have to be shoveled and put out past the parking poles, then we use a truck with a 8 foot back blade on it to pull out the snow where the loader can grab it a take it to the piles. Good Luck
     
  13. Rc2505

    Rc2505 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,245

    Also find a place to put up a salt shack or something to keep your salt dry. Large lots like this have a lot of drainage, but your pile will be frozen very quickly. Last thought for you is to make sure you have something to get under the empty trailers. The drivers are a bunch of wine babies if they have to drive over any snow to hook up the trailers. I built a offset plow the goes on the front of a loader to reach up under the king pins. We take a pass 3 feet out first to clear the snow, then use the off set plow to pull. anything that is under the trailers including the ridge we create while moving the first push
     
  14. 9.5hinvee

    9.5hinvee Junior Member
    from Mn
    Messages: 15

    Beanz, I will be looking forward to a response! I do have a pretty good idea what we would be getting into, we're not just a couple guys with a 4x4 and a shovel trying to make a buck... I also realize there will be years you do great, and years you might not even break even. Idealy long range we would hopefully find some accounts that are per hour/per push as well to average out the yearly contract account. However we are in an interesting situation as we are better equipped for large lots, than a bunch of smaller lots... and as a company, finding someone within dumb enough to want to tackle managing this is a challenge :) But personally a few larger accounts is less phone calls to deal with, and in my mind makes it a little easier to focus in and really keep customers happy.

    RC, I appreciate the input, the site its self makes a huge difference in the time it will take to do it... Have you seen or used a protech offset angled blade/pusher? This is what I have been looking into for wind rowing and cleaning under kingpins.... Seems like an ideal set up. No one that I know of in our area has an angled pusher like such for cleaning under king pins... We do currently use another guy in town for our salting, as we do our own stuff, and a neighboring businesses lot right now... we also have a sister company who has done some snow removal and has picked up a couple larger lots this year... so, we may look into our own sizable salt rig, and we do currently store a little salt for ourselves, but if we did a large stockpile it'd be offsite, in one of our quarries most likely.

    Thanks again, I appreciate the feedback