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New Rear Leafs - Any Suggestions?!?

Discussion in 'Ford Trucks' started by beverlylawncare, Jan 7, 2004.

  1. beverlylawncare

    beverlylawncare Member
    Messages: 78

    I have a 2001 F150 4x4 with 7700lb. group. I was wondering if I should add a leaf to my existing rear leafs (have 101k miles on them) or should I just purchase new leaf springs. I'd like to find an aftermarket company that makes same specs, length, width, etc., but with an additional leaf installed. I swapped out rear leafs on my 1996 Chevy K1500 with new K3500 ones, and it took me 2.5 hours with a helper. My cost was less than $250. A spring shop wants $325 to just ADD a leaf to my half worn out Fords.

    Thanks,
    Justin
     
  2. 75gmck25

    75gmck25 Senior Member
    Messages: 119

    Take a look at what is offered in the JC Whitney catalog as replacement springs. For my '75 GMC they have both 1850 lb rating and 2850 lb rating rear springs. I think the higher rated springs may also fit on the 1/2 ton trucks.

    Now for the caveat - My truck is a K25 that has original 2850 lb rated springs. However, my full floating rear axle is also rated for 5600+ lbs GVW. and I have ten ply truck tires that are rated for about 2850 lbs each. You could upgrade the springs in your F150 to reduce the sag, but it wouldn't mean you could necessarily carry that much more weight unless you make other upgrades.

    Bruce
     
  3. beverlylawncare

    beverlylawncare Member
    Messages: 78

    Bruce,

    My rear axle is rated at 4800 lbs, so I figure MAYBE 1500 for the frame and bed, etc, which leaves me 3300 or so for salt, etc. I already go with a Load Range "E" tire on my trucks, just for safe measures. Don't want a blow out with a pallet of salt in the bed now do we?

    I looked at the JC Whitney springs, I figured if they have a 2850 per pair rating, I'm not gaining over my factory ones. I can put a pallet (2500 lbs +/-), it just squats down an awful lot. I'm getting ready to head out to the garage in a few minutes to put my front Timbrens on. My plow dealer recommended rear Timbrens instead of an add-a-leaf. I don't know though....

    Thanks for the advice!
    Justin
     
  4. 75gmck25

    75gmck25 Senior Member
    Messages: 119

    I checked the online catalog and Whitney has 2850 lb. rated springs for your truck at $145 each.
    I think this is a per-spring rating, so the total is 5700 lbs for the pair. But, you might want to call them to verify.

    Bruce
     
  5. MickiRig1

    MickiRig1 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,617

    What about the Firestone air springs? Just add air when the weight is on it. Summitracing.com has the setups for most trucks. They just bolt between frame and axle. Add air when weight is on it. Run some pressure to keep it level when not loaded.
     
  6. beverlylawncare

    beverlylawncare Member
    Messages: 78

    I'll either go with new leafs with an extra one added, or Timbrens. No offense, but I've not been a huge fan on Air adjustable stuff due to leaks. A buddy of mine had a front set put on an older bodystyle Ford, and second snow out developed a leak. Now they won't hold for even a whole night.

    Thanks for the advice all!
    Justin
     
  7. The Boss

    The Boss 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,099

    I've seen alot of guys add timbrens to the rear of their trucks also. They've all had pretty good luck with them. Overloads help as well.:waving: