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new plower

Discussion in 'Business Fundamentals' started by truck1500, Aug 6, 2003.

  1. truck1500

    truck1500 Member
    Messages: 56

    i was wondering how do you figure out how much to charge for per push. how do most of you guys get your residential accounts and when should i start getting my accounts signed up.
     
  2. gslam88

    gslam88 Senior Member
    Messages: 168

    Truck,

    It really depends on your area. You may get $20 or you may get $100...talk with some of the guys in your area..
    Also check the networking with people in your area on the board....

    As far as getting customer on board, any time is good.... commercial accounts are looking now, residential... depends on the customer.. but soon enough...

    hope that helps a little

    Pete
     
  3. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    truck1500, have you ever had anyone plow for you. Or perhaps your parents or relatives have had someone plow for them? This might give you a place to start by knowing what is typical for a certain type of driveway. Then you can adjust by the size of place you are looking at. Don't worry about whether you are pricing exactly right to begin with. If you're too high, you won't get the jobs. Too low, you'll get them all. You'll be able to figure out which and adjust accordingly. Another tactic - the first year keep track of how long it takes to do each place you have. Figure out how much you want to make per hour; then compare how much you're actually making to what you want to make. The first year don't take on too many and keep real good records of when it snowed, how much, how long each place took to plow at different depths any difficulties you encountered and how much fuel you used for the route. Now, next summer you're going to have plenty of data to start forming a pricing structure.