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New concept in tires!

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by nsmilligan, Jul 26, 2002.

  1. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 704

    Found this site http://www.newind.is/english.htm while looking for tires sizes on another site. I'm a firm believer that a true snow tire aka plow tire is just that, and any street (summer m&s) is a compormise, so my trucks have their plow tires mounted on their own rims ( cheap at the junk yard) which go on at the 1st of the season and come off in spring. I also run studded tires (allowed here), but these may work for you guys who can't run studs or feel they may cause marks.

    Bil
    PS There is a Canadian and US manufactuer click Producersl
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2002
  2. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Interesting concept. But this is a retreading process and I just don't trust retreads.
     
  3. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 704

    I think it is. I've used retreads or remanufactured as they are now called because the tire has new rubber from bead to bead, not just the tread like large truck tires. I've used them for the last 7 years or so, and not a problem, in fact they are the best snow tires for traction I've ever used! My plow trucks very seldom see any highway ( 60MPH for extended periods) during the winter, and I take them off for the summer. At about 70% less then new tires they're the only way to go.

    Bill
     
  4. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Milligan, I use the same practice as you in having a set of wheels & tires exclusively for plowing. I had checked into Bandag retreads, but here they're only about 15% less cost than new. Where are you getting yours?
     
  5. JD PLOWER

    JD PLOWER PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 751

    Maybe I'm not seeing the picture clearly but they seem to be saying that since the granules never wear out the tire will always have traction. This might be true but those tires would never pass inspection with no tread depth and if your inspection is in the winter months changing tires (I don't have multiple sets of rims) isn't the very practical.
     
  6. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    I think the point was to show that the granules are throughout the tire, I doubt they recommend running the tire that far. Wouldn't be too good for sales, now, would it?:D
     
  7. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 704

    Pelican I buy my tires tru dealer from this retreader http://www.easterntire.ns.ca they have a toll free # to the US and US distributers. they are super they beat all the name brand snow tires I've tired for traction, but aren't worth a damn for tire wear on warm pavement ( the way a true snow tire should be )which the mainline tire manufacturers won't do because joe average wants tire wear as his main requirement. Also check out a US retreader http://www.high-tec-retreading.com they list pricing. I think bandag is mainly for large truck tires where they just replace the tread and they are more expensive then the retreads I use.

    Bill
     
  8. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    History repeats itself

    Other than using a modern materialfor the grit, those look a lot like what we used to see here about 30 years ago. At that time they were commonly called "sand treads" or "sandpaper retreads" The embedded grit was supposed to help on ice, it appeared to be nothing more than coarse sand. They pretty much went off the scene once studding became available.
     
  9. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 704

    Alan, Just goes to show that really nothing that really new!

    Bill
     
  10. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 704

    Just to bring you guys up to date, as some of you are starting to plan for winter, I bought 8 of these tires last winter, for my wife's Tracker ( replacing 4 season old ETS studded tires), and my Mazda, when winters over, and I don't have to plow anymore, Real Estate vehicle. I already put 4 of their regular product (Studded) on the Dodge, before I heard about Green Diamond tires. This year both the Trackless, which came with Skidsteer tires ( the worse snow tires I've ever had, but it was rented, now I own it) and the Dodge will have Green Diamond tires this winter. The BEST all around snow tire I've ever had on a vehicle.
    The biggest difference between them and studs is when there's no snow and the pavements wet, just like un-studded tires, but on ice ( especially wet ice awesome), and at 1/2 the price of a name brand tire. Yes they are RE-Manufactured tires NOT re-treads, the tire is remolded from bead to bead. They are available in the States, check the link in my original post, I dare some you to try them.:nod:
     
  11. Jerre Heyer

    Jerre Heyer Senior Member
    Messages: 948

    Our local General tire dealer started bringing these in last year. Several tread patterns were to be available. I had already purchased the studded tires so I ran them for the year.

    I'm giving my wife the option for the Green diamonds this year because several teachers she works with ran them on there awd vans instead of studs and loved them.

    General dealer said response was awesome and at the lower cost if you have to put them on every yr vs every 2 it's still a better gripping tire. Compound is soft and grips well when grouped with the chips.
     
  12. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 704

    Exactly what I found, as I said in the original post, they're not worth a damn for wear, in warm temps, but no snow tire should be, most snow-tires are a compromise, because consumers demand wear as one of their first criteria, but a good snow tire has to be soft at winter temps to be effective. If I have to go on an extended highway trip in winter, I change to my Michelin LTX tires and rims, and back to my plow tires.
    Jerre I should have known a progressive guy like you would have been on top of it!!:waving:

    Bill
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2003
  13. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Just curious about what your paying for these tires (CDN).I've been using the Cooper Discoverer M&S,which last forever if used only for plowing,and are priced right.They are one of the best tires I have ever driven on in the winter.I'm always open to new ideas,and these sound pretty neat.
     
  14. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 704

    Chris

    A 215x85x16 runs about $90.00, mounted and balanced, I like a narrower tire for plowing, and the 215's have the same rolling dia. as a 245 75.

    Bill
     
  15. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Pricing isn't bad.If I could find a few locally maybe I'll try a few sets this winter,and compare them to the Coopers.
     
  16. speedracer241

    speedracer241 Senior Member
    Messages: 325

    I got a price quote a while back for a set of the Green Diamonds for $275 for the all terrain tread and $295 for the mud terrain tread. These were for 235-75-16 tires delivered to my door. They are Michelin carcases in a D or E load range.

    I may try them this winter,
    Mark K

    The quote was from hi tech retreading.
     
  17. Mike Nelson

    Mike Nelson Senior Member
    Messages: 637

    Just my .02 cents

    I feel the sand will be worn down even with the rubber and you will get a smooth surface or just a tire with specs in it. One or the other is going to wear faster.

    Again just my own theory
     
  18. nsmilligan

    nsmilligan PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 704

    Actually Mike that isn't what happens there's always new pieces of carborundum coming to the surface, locking the wheels up on ice leaves a trail like there was a sheet of 40 grit sandpaper under each wheel, rubbing you hands over the tread you can feel the grit. As the rubber wears the grit pieces do get pulled out, but there's always new ones to take they're place, so the tire keeps it's extra traction all the way to the bottom of the tread.

    Bill
     
  19. Mike Nelson

    Mike Nelson Senior Member
    Messages: 637

    Thanks Bill,

    I understand what you are saying, but wouldn't the rubber be even with the grit at some point?
    If you can get the grit always sticking out,even after wear then the concept is great.

    I would try a set myself
     
  20. long0

    long0 Senior Member
    Messages: 247

    I ran a set of these tires last year plowing and as nsmilligan stated, they are the best snow and ice tires I have ever used. I just got another set of 245-75-16's last week. $225 out the door for all four. That does not include mounting or balance, but it is still a good deal.

    As far as wear is concerned, I have approx 25,000 miles on my first set and I hoping to get another 5,000 out of them.