1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Need to rack your brains on a 6.0

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by Sydenstricker Landscaping, Apr 15, 2007.

  1. Sydenstricker Landscaping

    Sydenstricker Landscaping PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,882

    Okay, I know I talked of this before about my exhaust manifold bolts being very rusty and a few of them have no heads on them, they are snapped off. My truck is a 2000 new body style with the 6.0 in it. Everyone has told me that it has aluminum heads. Well, I did a fool proof test that proved otherwise. Stuck a magnet to them, and sure enough, it stuck. And if I remember correctly, aluminum isnt magnetic. So why is everyone saying I have aluminum heads, when in reality, they are good ole cast iron? I dont understand the whole 6.0 thing, the motor to me, looks like a 350 5.7 with vortec 6000 badging on it. And as far as the manifolds go, how much of a PITA am I looking at with the great possibility of some of them breaking off instead of just coming loose? Do I need to get an easy out as well, or just leave this job to a pro? Thanks a bunch guys, Tom:waving:
     
  2. Joe D

    Joe D Senior Member
    Messages: 605

    It should have steel heads, 00 new body style 2500 8600lb GVW
     
  3. wfd44

    wfd44 Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 369

    The 6.0 is a member of the Chevy small block family. That's why it doesn't look a whole lot different than a Vortec era 5.7 or the 4.8 and 5.3 that are common to half tons from '99 or 2000 up.

    As far as the PITA factor of replacing the manifold bolts goes. Having cast iron heads is a plus in your favor. Steel bolts tend to weld themselves to aluminum heads and the threads are more easily damaged in aluminum. It all depends on how mechanical you are and how far it is to the garage if you get in over your head. Chances are some of the bolts tha still have heads are gonna break off. the gamble is in how much length is left to grab hold of on them (including those already broken). Gentle application of heat (have an extinguisher handy) good penetrating lube and patience will be your best friends in this task. If the bolts brake off flush with the surface of the head you will in all likely hood need to pull the head to get the rest of the bolt out (whether you do it or send it to a mchine shop). I wouldn't recomend trying to easy out the broken bolts with the head on the engine.

    P.S. easy out is the biggest misnomer in the tool box. Easy outs are in fact far from easy.
     
  4. RBRONKEMA GHTFD

    RBRONKEMA GHTFD 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,592

    My dad had a 2000 gmc with the 6.0 liter in it and when our barn burned down the truck was inside and when the fire was out we popped the hood to look at it and sure enough alum. heads. They were melted right to nothing. Not to mention the whole truck wasn't even a truck really it looked like a giant hot dog bun. I will get some pics of what the truck looked like after the fire.

    Ryan
     
  5. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Tom, being that your truck is a 2000 model year, it could have had either iron or aluminum heads as 2000 was the change over year between the alum and iron heads on the 6.0's. All '99 6.0's will be iron and all '01's will have aluminum heads but the 2000's can have either depending on the build date. As to getting the bolts out, it's just like the other guys said, some heat and a good penetrating fluid are the basic's to removing the broken bolt's. A good trick to removing any bolts that are broken off but still sticking out of the bolt hole(after removing the manifold) is to slip a nut over what's left of the protruding bolt and weld it to the bolt, then use the nut to back the bolt out. No only does welding the nut on give you a means to turn the broken bolt but the heat also helps to break the bond between the threads in the head and the bolt.
     
  6. Sydenstricker Landscaping

    Sydenstricker Landscaping PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,882

    Thanks alot guys!!:waving: Mine does have the steel heads, so that is a blessing in its own. I can do the work myself, cause the steel is much, much more forgiving than aluminum. I found a good set of pacesetter headers for my truck, so next month I will be pulling those goofy restrictive manifolds:gunsfiring: and swap in some good free flowing headers!!:D Then I think it will be due for a cat back dual exhaust!!! Do you guys think I should do anything to my computer after doing this since the exhaust will be much more free flowing? Or just leave it alone?
     
  7. wfd44

    wfd44 Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 369

    Along with headers and a cat back exhaust. I would put on a cold air kit (K&N, GMPP etc) and then add a tuner to maximize the gains (might need a different t-stat too).
     
  8. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    The factory manifolds actually aren't that bad as far as being a restriction but since your gonna pull them anyway to repair your broken bolts, that'd be a good time to go ahead and install headers since your only out the cost of the headers. A good quality cat-back is also a good choice for a little extra power. As to a PCM upgrade, I'd HIGHLY recommend going with a Wester's tune click here for Westers info. The Wester's PCM tune can remove some or ALL (it's your choice) of the torque management system that GM programs into the stock PCM's and will really wake up your truck. In fact, even without the add on exhaust mods your planning, the Wester's tune will make the truck feel like a completely different truck! They really are that good as GM leaves A LOT on the table with the stock programming on the newer trucks ('96-up) and that's why they respond so well to a custom aftermarket tune. The "hand held" store bought programmers are OK but even they leave a lot of potential power behind that the custom tune will give you.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2007
  9. carlriv2

    carlriv2 Senior Member
    from Mass
    Messages: 126

    I would cut/grind the remaining heads off and weld heads to them after you remove the manifold. It is no fun breaking a bolt and just one broken off too short will take a lot longer to get out than it will take to weld nuts on all 8. I have done it on 3 of my 6.0's and one of them twice. I was told to drill the hole in the manifold a tiny bit larger and the bolts wont break off anymore. I guess the manifold has a little movement without breaking the bolts then.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2007