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Need help about pre-wetting salt

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by ndnchief, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. ndnchief

    ndnchief Member
    Messages: 49

    I have recently bought a 2 yard Saltdogg, I have built a brine maker and I am currently making my own 90/10 mix of salt and calcium as well as straight calcium brine. Thanks to Kabota and deicepro. My question is this.......
    Can anyone give me advice as to their experiences with spraying their salt as it leaves the hopper especially with a saltdogg, what are your setups and has anyone tried the sprayer system saltdogg sells, I was going to use straight magic salt but if spraying my salt will give me good results spraying it with calcium then I would rather do that.
    Any advice or tips or general info would be much appreciated............................Thanks Mike
     
  2. Digger63

    Digger63 Member
    Messages: 44

  3. ndnchief

    ndnchief Member
    Messages: 49

    Let me ask this

    Magic salt claims to be safer or easier on grass, is this a trait of magic salt or will pre-wetting salt with calcium provide this same benefit
     
  4. Digger63

    Digger63 Member
    Messages: 44

    three fold question

    Most salt additives claim less destruction from the fact you would use less of the product to achieve the same results.
    All dry salt products treated or untreated needs a water source (snow or ice) to create a brine that will interact with snow and ice turn it back to water. Prewetting gives the salt the water source as it's being put down, reducing the time it takes to activate.
    Calcium chloride when mixed with water creates heat. Salt when treated with this will work at a lower temperture
     
  5. ndnchief

    ndnchief Member
    Messages: 49

    so if I am understanding you right the only reason magic or others are ( safer ) on vegetation is because you are possible putting less product on them...if so let me ask another question .....I have an apartment complex that I am thinking of spraying the sidewalks as well with a 90/10 mix of salt and calcium ( which actually is related to last question because of spraying but not pre-wetting salt ) ...........so a 90/10 mix would be more ( safe ), on the grass around walks because of using less salt in the brine rather than using granular salt itself or than using a straight calcium brine ..........I read the article you linked to...very informative....Thanks
     
  6. Digger63

    Digger63 Member
    Messages: 44

    anti-icing vs spraying

    Before anything was availible to add to salt, the rule was if it didn't melt fast enough when it got really cold out was to keep putting more straight salt on the road. Now with additives that let the salt work more effectivley at low tempertures less has to used.
    If your trying to keep the snow and ice from bonding to the concrete before a storm, yes you can spray. Remember it's there to keep the ice from freezing to the pavement and make plowing it off easy, not to melt inches of snow. But.... keep in mind the application rate. I do alot of anti-icing for my town,a local college, and a school district. I do both roads and parking lots.The mix I use is a combination of Icebite deicer, saltbrine, and calcium chloride ( 25%,70%,5%) the rate that i use is 30 gallons per lane mile ( 12ft x 5280ft = 2112 sq.ft. per gallon ). . When using a hand sprayer or a spray unit that isn't controled you can underspray or more than likely overspray. For steps and walkways more product sometimes can both waste product and cause a loss of friction that can cause a fall to occur.