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Need a little help here

Discussion in 'Meyer / Diamond Products Discussion' started by Moose's Mowing, Nov 16, 2013.

  1. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    I dug my plow out of the barn today. I noticed that it's busted. I must have torn it up last year and I didn't notice. The pivot on the drivers side is ripped right off the mold board. I think it's part 4 and 5 in the diagram below.

    How hard will this be to weld back up? I have a 220 stick welder, but it's pretty jagged up where it broke off. What's my best solution here?

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  2. mpriester

    mpriester Senior Member
    Messages: 404

    change the rib, tube and washer and change the pins, they look like they are frozen. the rib may come with the tube already installed.
     
  3. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    oh duuuuuh, good call on that. I didn't realize the ribs are sold separately. Looks like the tube comes already welded on the ribs. that outta be easy enough to do. thanks man.
     
  4. Why don't you take a grinder and clean up the rust and paint on both plow and your part and weld back in? Your done in an hour instead of opening a can of worms and making a mountain out of a quick and easy repair.

    Just sayin...:drinkup:
     
  5. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    You could just clean it up and weld it back but why half azz it?

    Weld that old back on that bent pivot pin and you're just asking to breakdown in the middle of a storm.

    Is the pivot pin frozen in the quadrant?

    Free up both pivot pins, replace them with new ones and weld a new tube in.

    Check the rib they mount to for rust. If the unit broke free because the parent metal is rusted down to paper thin you will need to either repair or replace that rib.

    You can buy aftermarket pins (with grease zerks), tubes and washers to do both sides for under $100 including shipping out of any of the supply houses. As mentioned earlier complete ribs are available with tube already mounted but add greatly to the price.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
  6. leolkfrm

    leolkfrm PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,418

    check out smith bros site...they vides how to repair them and the parts too!
     
  7. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    here's some progress updates:

    Got the bad rib cut out with the angle grinder. Took a little doing but it came out good. Managed to get one pivot pin out with some elbow grease and cussing. I've found yelling at things really helps to loosen them up. The passenger side pin wouldn't budge. No amount of swearing seemed to help. I've been threatening to buy a oxy/fuel torch for about 4 years and remembered my dad;s neighbor had one he wanted to sell. Ran up the road and picked it up for 125 bucks. Pretty decent shape too, it's a Victor torch. I put the rosebud tip on and heated the crap out of that pin and it finally let loose. I was going to gouge the welds off the bad rib but I'm pretty rusty with a torch so I just used the grinder. I didn't want to risk cutting through the plow skin, it's in bad enough shape as it is.

    I quit there for the night. I'm gonna swing by the local plow shop tomorrow after work and see if he's got the parts in stock. He's a big outfit and I'm pretty confident he'll have the stuff I need. If not, that Smith Brothers website had the ribs with the tubes and washers installed for either 40 or 60 bucks. the right and left were different prices for some reason. So I'll be able to get new pins, new spring eye bolts and a new rib for under 100 bucks. I'm half tempted to see what the plow shop guy would give me on a trade for my current blade and just get something a bit better, but I really can't justify it with the amount of snow we've been getting here the last few years. I think once I get this one back together it'll last a few more years.

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    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
  8. leolkfrm

    leolkfrm PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,418

    smith bros also has a hone to clean the rust from the inside of the tubes
     
  9. leolkfrm

    leolkfrm PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,418

    Meyer E-47 Lift Cylinder Flex Hone (E-46, 47, 57, 58, 60H, 61, 66, 68, and 88)
    View Larger Image
    Meyer E-47 Lift Cylinder Flex Hone (E-46, 47, 57, 58, 60H, 61, 66, 68, and 88)

    SKU: Hone-E-47


    Original Price: $32.00





    This is a Flex Hone used to Hone the E-46, 47, 57, 58, 60H, 61, 66, 68, and 88 Lift Cylinders (Click Related for E-60 Hone). Removes rust and pits. Will not remove bad pits, and scores but will smooth them out. Most can be honed, but some are just too far gone. We always hone Lift Cylinders when installing seal kits here in our shop. This is the same hone we use. Instructions on package. We force a clean damp rag through the cylinder when done in both directions to fully remove all traces of grit. Then clean with solvent.
     
  10. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    she's all done. It's getting a quick sanding and rattle can paint job today. Then I'm ready to roll until the next time I tear it up. Got the rib with tube, new greasable pins, and new spring bolts for 80 bucks or so. For some reason, the cotter pins that came with the pivot pins were too big. I had to drill them a touch larger, no biggie. Also, the rib wasn't bent to the exact radius as the old rib was. It had a sharper curve in it making it not lay correctly on the skin and that also made it about 1/4" too short on each side. Rosebud tip and a sledge took care of that. I'll see about getting a picture or two when it's all mounted up.

    Thanks for the help gentlemen.
     
  11. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    finally got this thing done today. They're calling for some snow on tues/weds. Maybe I'll actually make some $ this year with snow. The last pic is showing the snow flapper. I found a small conveyor belt at the bone yard yesterday. I heated it with a torch to get it to bend around the top of the plow and have it stay put over the front. I planned to bolt some angle to the top and attach the flapper to that, but I didn't have any angle laying around, thought I did. This seems to be working pretty well tho. I also just made a new counterweight for the bed. I built a 12"x16"x50" box out of scrap wood and filled it with concrete. Sunk a few pieces of scrap rod on the bottom, a short piece of chain and a bent rebar so I can pick it up with the loader. I used chain binders to hold it in place in the bed. I think it weighs around 700 lbs. Took 9 bags of ready mix.

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    Last edited: Nov 24, 2013
  12. leolkfrm

    leolkfrm PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,418

    looks good!..want to finish my king bolt repair?....20 degrees today and no heat in that barn
     
  13. Fantastic

    Fantastic Senior Member
    Messages: 187

    Any pics of the counter weight in the box?? I've heard of this through a buddy who's dad made a form and poured some concrete. Is just like to see one done.
     
  14. mpriester

    mpriester Senior Member
    Messages: 404

    Good Job and Stay Safe this week as they are throwing in some sleet and freezing rain with this one.
     
  15. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    I'll grab a pic if I remember when I get home from work.

    It's nothing fancy, literally scrap plywood screwed together to make the box. I already took that apart, so the pic will just show a block of concrete. I had some old grade stakes I put in an X shape across the bottom to help hold it together. I took a short piece of 3/8 chain I had laying around and looped it through the bottom. Each end comes out the top of the concrete on either side. That's what I hooked the binders to to hold it in place and that's what I hooked to the loader to lift it in. I stuck a U shaped rebar right in the middle sticking out of the top just in case I need to lift it from the center for whatever reason. I think the concrete cost me 38 bucks from the Lowes. The rest of the crap I found in the barn. Super easy.

    Last year I used cardboard boxes that hold reems of paper I got from my real job. I used those as the forms. They held about 2 bags each. I had to make them small enough that I could lift them in by hand since I didn't have a loader. Sometimes I used my boom pole on my old tractor to lift them in with a chain but I ran out of height. This new way is much cleaner, safer, and easier and faster. Not to mention easier on the old back.

    Hoping for snow tomorrow!!
     
  16. Fantastic

    Fantastic Senior Member
    Messages: 187

    So I've done some thinking... Yes, you do smell burnt rubber :laughing:

    Would this be similar to what you did before for counter weight?
    [​IMG]

    I'm thinking I'd still get full use (virtually) out of my box if I did it this way... Basically, making a wooden frame over the pieces of concrete and then covering the frame and concrete with plywood. Something I can lift myself in and out every season as I don't have a tractor :(

    Thoughts? Criticism?
     
  17. Moose's Mowing

    Moose's Mowing Senior Member
    from SE PA
    Messages: 198

    That'd work if you need traction. You idea was on here already a few times. What I needed was counterweight behind my rear axle to unload the weight of the plow from the front axle. I have a light duty blade, and prob used more weight than I needed, but it'll help with traction too. Here's some pics I just took. Sorry if they suck, it was dark. You can see where the binders are hooked on either side, there's a loop of chain running through the block, and at the top middle, you'll see the rebar loop.

    This is better than having loose sandbags rolling around and breaking open. And it's better than having 4 smaller blocks like last year. I could never get them tied down real well. I might cut holes in the bed with a hole saw, then weld some clevis hooks to the frame in 4 places. That way I can chain the block down real hard to the frame. My only worry is if I crash and those little hooks in the bed let loose, I'll have 700lbs of concrete sliding around. It's pretty secure now, but better safe than sorry.

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    Last edited: Nov 25, 2013
  18. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    That one ^^^ does look like it could be a bit dangerous in a crash.
    Probably an easy option that would work for a lot of people, rather than pouring concrete into a block, make a stack of patio stones. Cheap ones are about $5 each, and they can be laid out into a platform, or stacked near the back. Advantage to them is the lay low. If they're up against the front of the box, or a decent frame is built (out of wood) to hold them back, and a strap holding them down, they should stay more in place in a collision.