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My new 06 TJ suspension aids?

Discussion in 'Jeeps' started by larry newman, Dec 27, 2008.

  1. larry newman

    larry newman Member
    Messages: 45

    Will be running a light Sno-Way 6-8".

    This is my first Jeep with coil springs - what's the consensus on the use of Timbrens, air bags, etc. Had the Timbrens 2 Jeeps ago, and they are as rugged as a Jeep, to be sure.

    Opinions, please ?
     
  2. tjthorson

    tjthorson Senior Member
    from IL
    Messages: 126

    Timbrens can get pricey. The advantage to coil springs is the ability to put airlift bags right in them. Hardest part is pulling the springs to drill a hole in the spring perch for the air hose to run out. Basically, if you have a stock (no) lift, you dont even need a compressor to do it. Put the frame up on stands behind the front axle. Unbolt the bottom of the shocks, unbolt the sway bar links at the big torx bolt and nut by the axle. You most likely dont even need to mess with the track bar. Remove the bump stops. he rubber pulls and twists out by hand (sometimes really hard) and then there is a bolt and cup to remove. In the airlift box there is a round plastic" washer" - use that plastic washer INSTEAD of the stock rubber bump stop. After putting the springs back in, you can compress and wiggle in the airlift bag, the bump stop washer, bolt, etc - and bolt it up with the spring in place. Airup your bags and head out!

    Little trick for the spring removal - Put another floor jack under one end of the axle and jack it up. the other side will drop far enough to wiggle the spring out. Remove both sides, and drill a 1/2" hole in the little indent of the spring perch on the bottom.

    I run them front and rear - and 25lbs in the front is more then enough to take the load of the plow - and once unloaded - you cannot even tell they are in there, because the bump stop doesnt hit the airbag until the suspension loads up.

    Airlift bags can be bought almost anywhere - part # 80702 for the jeep Wrangler fronts. They are usually around $75 for the pair, super easy to install, and work great.

    Pics from the first jeep after I installed the airlifts.... this was a lifted jeep - so your bump stop washer will be closer to the airlift bag.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2008
  3. JeepTJ

    JeepTJ Senior Member
    Messages: 225

    I just ordered the same Air Lift air springs for the front of my XJ. These should help the squat with the Sno-Way on. I'm also getting Monroe Max-Air air shocks for the rear. I put about 2-300 lbs of sand in a Rubber-Maid container in the cargo area for sanding the icy driveways. The Monroe's should help here. I have oversized tires and no lift, so I get mild rubbing if I load up with passengers. I also use the Air Lift air springs in my motorhome for added weight rating gain.

    Fran
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2008
  4. theplowmeister

    theplowmeister 2000 Club Member
    from MA
    Messages: 2,551


    WOW you shure air shocks arn't easier

    Lets see..... take out the shock, put in the new shock, run the air lines. Go drive
     
  5. JeepTJ

    JeepTJ Senior Member
    Messages: 225

    I'm afraid it's a bit more complicated than that. You forgot: 'add air'. :D

    Fran
     
  6. tjthorson

    tjthorson Senior Member
    from IL
    Messages: 126

    Air shocks can add a whole new dimension to ride quality. Let alone the fact that trying to find an air shock for a lifted jeep probably isnt a "normal" item.

    If you are installing a lift - you already have the jeep apart anyway, I drill the holes on any jeeps I touch - so in the future they can add the bags without even using any tools.

    Every person has their preference. For me - the cost, effectiveness, and "invisibleness" of the airlift bags are worth the hour to drill two holes. But - you clearly like the air shocks - my only experience with air shocks was on the back of a vehicle - and i felt the ride was harsh, and they didn't dampen very well. But - you like them - so - for any future searchers that might want to try it - whats the part numbers for a Jeep Wrangler with 0" lift and a 2.25" lift?

    I like the air bags because even aired up - you cant tell they are on the jeep unless i have the plow on.... Just my experience and opinion.
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2008
  7. theplowmeister

    theplowmeister 2000 Club Member
    from MA
    Messages: 2,551

    OK I guess we disagree, you like bags I like shocks

    From the picture it looks like you have about 2" of sag BEFORE the air bags come into play.

    I've had both, and find the air shocks easier to install and have a less harsh ride
     
  8. tjthorson

    tjthorson Senior Member
    from IL
    Messages: 126

    Its OK - lots of room for differing opinions. I like the airshock idea for the back better - but I like choosing my shocks - especially because my Jeep is driven so much on the road - NOT with a plow on it.... As you state, there are 2" of sag before the bag hits - which reinforces my point that the bags have no effect on normal driving - and only kick in once the plow goes up.... :D You can lessen that effect by spacing down the bump stop....

    You also have a 700# plow (saw that from another thread). My Sno-way MT is 460 all in. The downpressure makes it plow like a 700# plow though.... ;)

    Its all good - I like hearing different ways to solve a problem - that gives people options.