1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Modifying Snoway to prevent spring slap

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by oldmankent, Mar 8, 2002.

  1. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    Has anyone ever thought about doing this? I hate the recoil if the plow trips, it really bangs hard, even if I'm careful about it. Doesn't seem like it would be very easy to put a shock on the plow for a slower recoil. Just wondering if anyone else has thought about it.
     
  2. speedracer241

    speedracer241 Senior Member
    Messages: 325

    I had the same idea as you. I have an older Western plow with 3 springs on it and it springs back pretty hard. I was thinking about puting a couple shocks on to make it like a pro-plow. doesn't look like a real big project on the Western so i wouldn't think it would be too tough on yours. I'm thinking it looks like a good summer time project. Keep us posted on how it works for you.
    Happy fabricating,
    Mark K
     
  3. Ohiosnow

    Ohiosnow Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 415

    Trip springs

    I fab some last yr. for 2- Western 8'6" plows, it's a very easy project :) . Never seen a Snoway but I would think it could be done with a little fab work too.

    Brent
     
  4. SlimJim Z71

    SlimJim Z71 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,031

    Ya know... I caught a speedbump just right the other day, and thought of the exact same thing. The do rattle the teeth out of your head when then slam back don't they. I was actually thinking of seeing if I could find a couple of the little "bumpers" they use on the hood of your truck under the bug deflector, and putting them on the stops. They're pretty rigid, and I think they'd handle the force, but getting them to stay put might be another story. Yeah, the shock sounds like it'd be a better idea...
     
  5. BRL

    BRL PlowSite.com - Veteran
    Messages: 1,277

  6. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,317

    It sounds easy. On an old Western it probably is, since you can mount the shock the same as the newer Westerns, and you can also use the Western shock (which was a Gabriel last time I assembled a Pro Plow).

    Not so easy on other plows, at least without doing some geometry on paper first. Pivot points need to to be located to allow the shock to fully extend without hitting the moldboard. The shock also has to be able to fully extend without bottoming out when the moldboard is at full trip. The shock cannot limit the trip of the plow, or the shock mounts will get torn off (I have seen this happen on trucks without new shocks after a 2" lift) of the moldboard or sector. Worse, something else could bend instead...

    Also, the shock itself should be vavled to extend almost freely, but on compression, slow down drastically. Belive me, I have thought of doing this to my Meyer before, and even started it all on graph paper. All I needed was the Gabriel part#.


    I think a shock for trip recoil was a feature many of us asked for in an old thread about the ultimate plow.


    ~Chuck
     
  7. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    Chuck, I understand your point but I think an easy way to solve this would be to duplicate the mounting point measurements of the Pro Plow and then use their replacement shock. It might cost a few bucks more, but it would eliminate all the calculating you mentioned. I might try this on my Blizzard.
     
  8. Chuck Smith

    Chuck Smith 2000 Club Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 2,317

    Pelican, you're missing the point a little. The axis of both pivot points have to be taken into consideration, as well as the arc of travel. For example, and all numbers are hypothetical......
    If the Western shock mounts 6" behind the moldboard pivot point, and two inches above the moldboard pivot point where the shock is bolted to the sector, and uses a shock that is 14" long when fully extended, and is attached 2" forward of the moldboard pivot point, and 8" above the moldboard pivot point...........

    You would have to duplicate all those variables to work with your application. All you really need to get the actual shock is the Gabriel part number, which is actually stamped on the shock body. Just take a look at a buddy's Pro Plow, or one at a dealer.

    Then, you have to be sure that the shock will be long enough to work with the location on the mounts on the sector and the moldboard. Also, the closer to 90° the better as far as how the shock works throughout it's stroke. Shock's don't work as effectively, the further you go from 90°.

    I am in no way saying it can't be done, actually I am saying it can, but I am also saying there are many variables to factor in, and the time spent on graph paper with a compass and ruler will save a lot of tack welding, test fitting, and aggrivation. It's better to prove it on paper, then do the tacking, testing, rewelding, and enjoy the aggrivation. :D

    ~Chuck
     
  9. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    Something else to remember is that different brands of plow may trip more to horizontal before maxing out. My Meyer has stops on the bottom to prevent the blade from tripping to far. Not sure on other plows.

    You would not want to overextend the shock because as Chuck said the mounts would break.
     
  10. Pelican

    Pelican 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,075

    That's the point of my post, my feeling is since Western has allready done the math, why not use their numbers? It's foolproof and proven. The only variables that might differ are the radius of the moldboard arch and amount of travel as CTfireman mentioned. If those points don't exist on a given plow frame, then you'd have to go to the drawing board like you suggest. I just like to take the easy route when it's available.:D
     
  11. Ohiosnow

    Ohiosnow Senior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 415

    OK guys

    When I did it on the Westerns it was easy as I took the measurements off a Western with shocks.

    But it's not hard to figure out all the variables on each plow on the plow. Just put the plow on the truck & carefully remove the trip springs ( plow can & will fall forward ). Now you can see the full trip movement.

    You now saved yourself a lot of guess work. But remember to add a little each way extra as the manufactures do on their shock set-ups. ;)

    Brent
     
  12. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    Plow shock

    I don't think the western measurements would work for a snoway. I haven't taken a very close look at mine yet, but I think it would be very difficult to put a shock onto the snoway. The pump is right behind the plow and the only pivot points in the center seem to be fairly thin metal. I'd think one would want the shock to pivot with the plow so it was always been pushed from straight on and not at an angle. This definitely sounds like a summer project.
     
  13. SlimJim Z71

    SlimJim Z71 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,031

    Or maybe my bump-stop idea wouldn't be so bad...
     
  14. oldmankent

    oldmankent PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,318

    yeah, the bump stop idea may be the way to go. Only thing is it wouldn't slow done the trip return just muffle the sound and stop that awful banging. Those are the worst parts of it anyway.
     
  15. plowking35

    plowking35 2000 Club Member
    from SE CT
    Messages: 2,923

    If you are just looking for bump stops, urethane will work a whole lot better than rubber.
    Dino
     
  16. Alan

    Alan PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,393

    Nope,, tried that idea myself. The constant pressure against the urethane just crushed it. Maybe a harder compound than the edge material might work.