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Mastercraft Courser MSR Studded

Discussion in 'Truck & Equipment Repair' started by FordFisherman, Jan 25, 2013.

  1. FordFisherman

    FordFisherman PlowSite.com Addict
    from 06611
    Messages: 1,594

    Anybody run these? How do they perform? Price? Wear? Looking into a set of 235's.
     
  2. SharpBlades

    SharpBlades Senior Member
    Messages: 366

    I run courser msr 245's without studs, They are great. Very good traction, The price isn't terrible, I think I paid $1100 for 2 sets installed in 2011. I get about 2 years out of them running them year round, probably aroung 15,000 miles give or take.
     
  3. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    I've found, over the years, that mastercrapt brand tires tend to wear quickly. Poor rubber.
     
  4. meborder

    meborder Senior Member
    Messages: 142

    first time i've heard anything about poor quality.

    they're made by cooper.

    i've never used them, but i see a lot of them around town. I was going to get Mastercrafts, but just before i pulled the trigger the Coopers went on sale so i got those instead.
     
  5. FordFisherman

    FordFisherman PlowSite.com Addict
    from 06611
    Messages: 1,594

    Got a set put on. 235/85/16. Beefy tread, look good, now all we need is some snow. They are dedicated snow tires so if I get 4 or 5 seasons at 6000mi. per season I'll be more than happy. Will give performance results soon hopefully.
     
  6. jasonv

    jasonv PlowSite.com Addict
    from kannada
    Messages: 1,114

    It really doesn't matter who they're made by, its a private store brand sold at a discount. Most manufacturers will tend to cut quality for this kind of deal, sell the good ones under their own "premium" brand.