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Manual hub hard to turn

Discussion in 'Ford Trucks' started by Flipper, Sep 22, 2008.

  1. Flipper

    Flipper PlowSite.com Addict
    from CT
    Messages: 1,180

    Went to turn the hub on the dump today to lock it up as I had to get back up a muddy hill. The passenger side was VERY hard to turn. Ended up using a pair of pliers. Driver's turned no problem. 4x4 did work as the front tires did get power. When returning to freewheel it was just a hard. Any advice? Never had a problem like this before.

    Truck had brakes at begining of last winter. Hubs were fine all winter and the few times I have used them this summer. Truck hasn't sat in water or anything.
     
  2. creativedesigns

    creativedesigns PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,929

    Try some Fluid Film. Also its good to turn them back n' forth once a week. Leave them on Lock position, so when you need 4x4 it's easier. Just controll it from inside. easy!
     
  3. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    What year truck Flip?
     
  4. Doakster

    Doakster Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 650

    If the hubs are cycled enough they can be hard to turn every now and them, since you just cycled them once, give it a bunch more tries and maybe shoot some lube around the housing and part that pivots.

    When I bought my truck they were very hard to turn, the previous owner probably never manually locked them in, I cylced them a bunch and that's all they need.
     
  5. Flipper

    Flipper PlowSite.com Addict
    from CT
    Messages: 1,180

    Its an 01, only manual hubs, not the auto ones that can be locked. Same as my 99 which are easy to turn. I will try some spray lube and move it back and forth.

    In the winter they stay locked most of the time. Only unlock them when no snow around or making a longer trip.
     
  6. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Ok, '99-up...the O-ring is dry in the hub dial...happens often during lack of use.
     
  7. Flipper

    Flipper PlowSite.com Addict
    from CT
    Messages: 1,180

    So should I try to spray in it, or better to disassemble it now for service? I have taken them apart before, just looking for best solution.
     
  8. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    To do it right and prolong the results yes, I'd pull it apart and grease it. I actually use silicone grease on the O-rings in this type of application instead of wheel bearing/chassis grease....seems to last longer.
     
  9. hydro_37

    hydro_37 PlowSite Veteran
    from iowa
    Messages: 3,790

    Now is the time for a clean and re-grease of the hub. Should be easy since you have done it before. xysport
     
  10. Flipper

    Flipper PlowSite.com Addict
    from CT
    Messages: 1,180

    Yeah that's what I was thinking. Wasn't trying to be lazy, it was more, would the repair be more effective by taking it apart. It sounds like it will so I will get it done this weekend.
     
  11. dieselpusher

    dieselpusher Senior Member
    Messages: 208

    is it bad to leave the hubs locked all the time even when not in 4wd?
     
  12. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    No. Many guys leave them locked all winter on plow dedicated trucks. Me included.

    The slight additional wear is negligible.
     
  13. Flipper

    Flipper PlowSite.com Addict
    from CT
    Messages: 1,180

    Well I guess I haven't taken it apart as far as I needed to. I got the hub off the truck, got te snaprings off and the white spacer along with the inner gear and bearing out. Both the larger thinner spring and the smaller thciher one.

    Now there is a white cup in the hub body the the thicker spring contacts. It is loose but I can't get it to fall out or be pulled out. I am assuming if I get this out I will be able to access the back ot the knob to get it off the hub body and clean lubricate the O-ring.

    Any thoughts?
     
  14. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Flip, the nylon assembly that you see at the bottom of the hub is setting on a small "button" that is molded on the neoprene diaphragm that you can't see. This "button" is actually pushed into a small hole of the same diameter as the button and will only be released with a small amount of upward force. If you grasp the nylon assembly with needle nose pliers and pull, it will release and come out of the hub. Like this:
     
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2008
  15. ducatirider944

    ducatirider944 Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 469

    If it is a plow truck only not that big of a deal because the roads are always slick when you drive it. If your running around on dry pavement with the front hubs locked, just roll down the window and start throughing cash out the window. Just probably about 10-15% worse mpg. extremely hard on front hubs, tie rod ends, ball joints, tires. I always lock in my auto hubs into the manual over ride when plowing. A few years ago the last time I plowed I forgot to unlock them. We had just went to the ultra low sulfer diesel and people were getting lower mpg. I didn't think anything about it when my mileage went from 14.5 mpg to 12.5 mpg just figured it was the new fuel. Well about 5 months later the truck was acting like the front was loose. Took it in to the dealer and dropped about $2250 rebuilding the front end. I was a little pissed because at that time it was only a few thousand miles out of warranty. It was my own fault but still pissed me off.
     
  16. ducatirider944

    ducatirider944 Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 469

    I don't know how much differance there is between the auto and manual hubs but here is a link with step by step instructions to rebuild the auto locking hubs that ford says can't be serviced! Might be the $350 a pop they get for new ones!:eek:

    http://guzzle.rbmicro.com/allube.html
     
  17. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    While running with the hubs locked will lower MPG's, it is NOT extremely hard on the hubs, tires, and/or tie-rods unless the T-case is also engaged and your actually appying power to the front drive train on hard ground. When the hubs are only locked (withouts the T-case engaged) the front drivetrain isn't having any power applied to it, so it's not "connected" the the rest of the drive train so there is no additional stress or binding caused by it.

    If your tie-rods and hubs needed replaced, they needed replaced whether you ran it with the hubs locked or not.

    Many newer vehicles out there (Durangos, Dakotas and some Jeeps for example) don't even have a way to disconnect the front drivetrain from the wheels. When the tire turn so does the rest of the front drive train.
     
  18. ducatirider944

    ducatirider944 Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 469

    Negative ghost rider! Full time 4wd vehicles of today allow for slippage in the hubs and or the differential. So you mean to tell me that when you lock in your hubs on say a F-350 with a solid front axle you have slippage? where? how? Guarantied I'm a ******* for not paying attention to my truck and not noticing you get bind. Go lock in the front hubs and turn your wheels all the way to the left or right and drive forward. Does your front end jump on dry pavement? Mine does. It is because when you have your front hubs locked the only way you get slippage is slick roads. So where does that pressure on your front end go until it gets to the point where your tires actually give? I would guess it would be ball joints and hubs. It's not that much pressure just probably about 3700 lbs on a diesel like mine.

    If it doesn't cause premature wear how come in about 10-12K miles from again being a ******* and leaving my hubs locked on dry pavement. I had to replace my hubs and ball joints and yes I did see how much play was in them and they did need to be replaced at about 40K miles and I damn well make sure I have my hubs unlocked on dry pavement now. I now have 130K and they are still within spec but are getting close to needing to be replaced but that is about 90K on the second set.

    This is just my experience first hand. I'm not saying I'm right but logic says I am?
     
  19. B&B

    B&B PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 12,777

    Never said anything about FULL TIME 4WD vehicles. Thats a completely different system than those of a Super Duty.

    You do have "slippage" as you refereed to it...because while with the hubs locked ONLY, the front drivetrain IS connected to the wheels..it's NOT connected at the other end to anything else...because you don't have the T-case engaged. So the front drivetrain can slip or float all it wants. There's nothing to mechanically "lock" it to prevent it.

    I think if you understood the workings of a PART TIME 4WD system it would be much more clearer to you as to why ONLY having the hubs locked dosen't add resistance/stress to the steering/drivetrain.
     
  20. ducatirider944

    ducatirider944 Senior Member
    from Iowa
    Messages: 469

    Ok so if there is slippage because the transfer case isn't engaged how come if you jacked up the front of the truck with the hubs locked in and I hold the drivers side wheel you could turn the passanger side wheel?