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lubing movable parts?

Discussion in 'Fisher Engineering Discussion' started by Brett K, Nov 22, 2005.

  1. Brett K

    Brett K Member
    Messages: 42

    What have you folks been using to protect your movable parts like lift and angle cylinders, pins, etc? I just replaced all of them on a used Fisher I picked up and want to know what everyone recommends. I have seen people put a thin coat of grease on them but I am curious about the effects on the internal seals.
     
  2. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 7,565

    The grease people put on the rams is for summer storage. During the plowing season you don't need to put any thing on the rams, Now, for the pins I use spray on grease.
     
  3. danno

    danno Senior Member
    Messages: 401

    Fluid film
     
  4. plowed

    plowed Senior Member
    Messages: 344

    DITTO!!! I just ordered a case of it and will be coating everything on the plows and trucks!
     
  5. snoluvr

    snoluvr Senior Member
    from RI
    Messages: 266

    lube

    I store the plow inside, so it seems to help a lot. After every storm, the plow is washed down, and re-lubed. I coat all moving parts with white lithium grease, or wd-40..depending where.All pins are replaced every two years..Never have had a breakdown yet..worth the hew extra bucks.
     
  6. justme-

    justme- 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,138

    WD40 doesn't stay on long enough , white litheum greese works pretty good. Local dealer recomends Silicone spray- works pretty good. I have alturnated on white lith and silicone- depending on what can is in the truck at the time, but I'll be useing Fluid Film from now on! (if you're replaceing your pins every two years and they're worn moderatly your lube isn't doing anything! Same pins in my MM1 for 6 years now- yeah it's loose and they're worn but never any problems. )

    After the rain we had here the past few days the FF on my plow pins is still there- not glossy anymore but definatly still there and lubricating. (WD would be long gone and white lith would have been dried to a film with minimal luberication- silicone would be ok, but it seems to protect more from rust than lubricate on steel
     
  7. snoluvr

    snoluvr Senior Member
    from RI
    Messages: 266

    Lubing parts

    I only change out the parts as a precaution..Like we all carry insurance, I change what wears. I find spending a little bit goes further than breaking down during the night.
     
  8. ratlover

    ratlover PlowSite.com Addict
    from IL
    Messages: 1,325

    Spray litium grease. I have a V so I can colapse all my rams. Wash after every storm and then go spray the grease after every storm. Wire and chain lube works ok. WD dosnt stick long enough IMO. Actual grease if I take the part out.
     
  9. Fluid Film ?????

    What on earth is FLUID FILM ???


    :confused: :confused: :confused:
     
  10. justme-

    justme- 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,138

    Read the "free gift" thread in commercial snowplowing forum.
     
  11. kingriver

    kingriver Senior Member
    from alaska
    Messages: 217

    FLUID FILM, A MUST HAVE FOR ANYONE. THE STUFF REALLY STANDS UP TO ITS NAME, TRY IT ON LOCKS AFTER A WASH, GUARANTEE YOUR LOCKS WILL NOT FREEZE-UP IF LEFT OUT IN THE COLD. TRY ALITTLE ON BATTERY CABLES, THE STUFF IS AMAZING:cool: :cool:
     
  12. Brett K

    Brett K Member
    Messages: 42

    I wonder how effective a good coat of wheel bearing grease would be on all the pins?
     
  13. justme-

    justme- 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,138

    Well, I know it does dry out with air exposure and stops lubricating when that happens (becomes more of a glue at that point) and it gets stiff in the cold, so probabily not too well. There is such a thing as low temp wheel bearing greese which could hold possibility.

    I was planning on sleeving my pins and drilling for Zerk fittings when I rebuild mine so I can set a greese gun with White Lith specifically for it, now that I found FF though I don't think I'll go through the effort.
     
  14. Brett K

    Brett K Member
    Messages: 42

    Good info. Thanks for saving me the time. I'm waiting on my FF sample.
     
  15. Mowerpan

    Mowerpan Senior Member
    Messages: 305

    I just used wheel bearing grease, it's cold here and its still lubey(nice word ey?)
     
  16. Robhollar

    Robhollar Senior Member
    Messages: 766

    Ive already sleaved my lifting arm and I drilled and tapped the main pins. I put a 90 deg zerk fitting. And I grease the plow every other event....Rob
     
  17. dlitten

    dlitten Junior Member
    Messages: 8

    I've just refurbished my 2nd Fisher plow, and am using wheel bearing grease on all pins. Seems to me, use the thickest stuff you can find on these pins.

    In the off-season, I spray on some WD40 on exposed piston shafts.
     
  18. justme-

    justme- 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,138

    WD40 is useless in off season for piston protection- it doesn't last. Seriously man, use white lith, wheel bearing grease, FF or something of the grease nature for your own sake.

    Glad to know others have tried it and it's working. I wonder what temps low temp grease is needed for. MI can get pretty cold.
     
  19. SnoFarmer

    SnoFarmer PlowSite Fanatic
    from N,E. MN
    Messages: 7,565

    I use to use low temp wheel bearing grease as it's good enough for your wheel bearings when the temp goes sub zero, isn't? So it should be good enough for the plow?
    Up here in Northern MN ,it gets very cold, The grease won't tern to glue at low temps, only very old grease will harden over time.
    I now use a high molybdenum grease (the thick gray stuff) It's what you should be using on pins, hinges, pivot points, every thing that does not have any bearings in it.and lith is to light.
    Why? When you use your plow it experiences some very high shock loads.
    The thin wheel bearing grease will splash out (even when it's -30) when impacted and it will wash out from the snow.
    The thick moly grease won't. It will still be there after a couple of plowings,
    I will grease the plow every other time out and there is still some grease from last time.
     
  20. danno

    danno Senior Member
    Messages: 401

    I also use "waterproof" wheelbearing grease. I have a boat trailer.