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lift kit

Discussion in 'Chevy Trucks' started by snowjoker, May 29, 2003.

  1. snowjoker

    snowjoker Senior Member
    Messages: 283

    Does anybody know where I can get a 2-3 inch suspension for my 93 K-2500 4X4? and about how much they are. I want to get a couple inches higher so i can run my plow higher Thanks Walt
     
  2. wxmn6

    wxmn6 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,037

    Can't you just turn up the torsion bars? Also a set of Timbrens load boosters should help keep the front end from sagging.
     
  3. snowjoker

    snowjoker Senior Member
    Messages: 283

    I have the torsion turned up almost all the way. Maybe i should get the timbren's instead, i would think they would be cheaper than a lift kit. The truck runs warm with the plow up even after a new radiator, water pump and thermostat i thought if i lifted it up a couple inches i could get more air past the plow.
     
  4. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    If you go with a suspension lift,the plow will go up with it,as the whole truck goes up.This won't help your cooling problem.Suspension kits for IFS aren't cheap,or easy to install,as you have to drop the whole subframe and diff to accomplish the lift,and keep suspension geometry correct.The added height will just make the truck less aerodynamic,and it will have to work harder to go fast,which makes it run hotter.

    A body lift kit will lift the body,and the rad,because the rad is body mounted.The cooling fan will be lower though,and you will have to trim your rad shroud to make it fit.This will also not help your cooling problem.The plow will now sit lower in relation to the grille,which may help cooling or airflow a bit,but not much.

    It's also harder to plow in a lifted truck,as you can't see the plow,and the ground in front of the truck as well.It will take some getting used to.

    Cranking the torsion bars more than an inch will just reduce downwards suspension travel,and reduce droop.It also affects the ride quality as your shocks now compress less,and provide less damping.It's also very hard on front end components,and halfshafts too.Going with a stiffer torsion bar (higher spring rate),which is set to the proper ride height will help the sag when the plow is on.Timbrens have a similar effect by increasing the spring rate to keep the front end up.

    The first thing I would do is properly solve your cooling problem.The most likely culprit is the clutch fan.The kick in temp may be too high,or it may not kick in at all.The plow blocks airflow through the rad,which also reduces airflow to the clutch fan,and it may not see enough hot air to kick in.A lower rated clutch fan will probably help,or use a solid fan,and eliminate the clutch.

    Another thing to check is are all the factory device to help airflow in place ? The lower airdam,rad to body seals,and the fan shroud all work together to force air through the rad.Also if you have tranny coolers,and AC,make sure the condensor and coolers aren't plugged or blocking airflow.Even the rad fins could be plugged up some.

    Has the truck ever had the intake gaskets replaced ? If so they may have used the wrong gasket,and coolant is bypassing between the heads.

    Check all the basics first.You can also vary your driving,by using a lower gear,to turn the engine,water pump and fan faster.Playing with the plow height,and angle may also help.
     
  5. snowjoker

    snowjoker Senior Member
    Messages: 283

    I just had head gaskets put on in march,I did think about the clutch fan.I never liked the clutch fans i know they use less power but i dont mind giving up a couple horses for a fixed blade fan, i will try to find one this summer so i can be ready. Any suggestions on where to look for a fan? thanks
     
  6. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Get an OEM 5 or 7 blade OEM,original equipment fan from a wrecking yard.They pull WAY more air than a cheap flex fan.You may have to take in your clutch fan to match up the bolt circle,as they had different sizes.You will also need a fan spacer,which you may be able to find with the fan at the wreckers,or goto a speed shop and buy an aluminum one.You will need this,as without the clutch assy,the fan will be too far away from the rad to pull air.

    You will also have to pull the studs out of the water pump hub,and get longer bolts.They are usually 5/16 fine thread..You can get the studs out by using two of the nuts,and tighten them together to lock them on the stud,then use the inner nut to turn the stud out with a wrench.
     
  7. 90plow

    90plow Senior Member
    Messages: 738

    Maybe electric fans? And what about a snow foil. I know the fisher plows get them put on so they dont blow the air over the hood but trap the air in front of the plow and let different air hit the radiator. Another thing what about driving with the plow angled or do you drive with it straight and how high do you put the blade? I know you may have the plow angled and low but you never said if you did. The angle will alow air to get in from one side. I found this true on my truck and my bosses trucks when they would start running hot.
    Eric
     
  8. snowjoker

    snowjoker Senior Member
    Messages: 283

    90 plow i do have a deflector on the plow (homemade rubber from a grvel pit about 10 inches tall and 1/2 inch thick and very stiff!) i usually run angled and fairly low if it does start to warm up i straighten it and drop it almost to the road. I thought about electric fans but have air so the condensor is blocking almost the entire radiator and no place to put it
     
  9. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    I have always found with the Fisher Snofoil the trucks seem to run hotter.It would be neat to take someof this stuff to a wind tunnel,with different trucks and plows,to see where the air really goes.

    A rubber deflector can sometimes hurt cooling too,especially if it blows up when traveling at speed,and blocks more air.I have seen some with a strip of steel across the front,to add weight,and help keep it from flying up.

    Electric fans don't flow enough CFM to cool a hot running motor,especially one that is having rad airflow problems in the first place.
     
  10. snowjoker

    snowjoker Senior Member
    Messages: 283

    That rubber flap is very stiff cruising at 50 mph it might rise 2 inches at most. I think the problem is the clutch on the fan so it will be replaced with a straight blade fan with some spacer behind it this summer sometime.
     
  11. Joey D

    Joey D Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    Snojoker, Don't install a fixed blade fan. Get a better clutch for you fan. You can get a clutch that engages at a lower temp. How many blades on your fan? What size is it?
    Electric fans are expensive for a good one with a high CFR rating. I think the highest available is a dual fan that will pull 5000CFM. I don't know what a stock fan pulls
    As far as a lift, is your truck a 6 lug axle? They do make a 3inch lift for the 6 lug trucks but not the 8 lug ones. I know guys that plow with 4 inch lifts that work fine. Take the plow to a welding shop and have them cut the ends off and raise them a couple inches. That plus the adjustment they already have you can still keep the a-frame level like it should be.

    Shoot me your e-mail and I will send you some pictures of a custom dual fan set up I made using Ford Tauras fans.
     
  12. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    I don't know exact figures,but I know most OEM fans will outflow even the best of the electric fans,like the Black Magic dual setup.

    A better clutch fan will help,but there is no guarantee it will work as designed if you can't get the airflow to heat it up and kick it in.A solid fan will do a better job of cooling,and provides continuos airflow to the trans cooler as well.
     
  13. snowjoker

    snowjoker Senior Member
    Messages: 283

    wyldman i think i started something now:eek: i have a 5 blade clutch fan on it now. I have all summer to figure out what i should do. I don't know what is better i have already gone through the options of electric fan, a severe duty clutch and a straight blade fan. My truck does not over heat just runs warmer than i would like it too.I did not know that there were clutches that kick in at lower temps so i guess i will hafto see what everybody says and go from there.
     
  14. Joey D

    Joey D Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    A fixed fan will be worthless unless your driving with the plow on and need the added airflow. During normal driving it will be on wasting fuel and robbing power.
    Try the hayden severe duty clutch, which is supposed to engage about 15 degree's cooler and get a fan from a 01 D-Max. It is a plastic fan with 9 blades and will bolt on. It moves alot of air
     
  15. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    "Trying" stuff is hard to do.Most parts places won't take back a fan after you buy it,so it can get expensive just "trying" things.

    I don't doubt there is probably help you problem,finding one,or verifying it is a fan problem is the hard part.

    You can get a cheap OEM solid fan and spacer ,even the bolts,from an auto wrecker cheap,probably under 20 bucks.You know it's gonna work,because it spins all the time.It doesn't hurt gas mileage by much,and you can go back to the original clutch fan in the summer.If it solves the problem then you know it's definitly a fan clutch engagement problem.Then you can start trying different clutch fan if you feel you need to go back to one when plowing.

    Joey D - I'm not trying to argue what you are saying,just trying find a reasonable solution without throwing expensive parts at it.
     
  16. Joey D

    Joey D Senior Member
    Messages: 280

    Wyldeman, I know, just different opinion's. I did the D-Max fan on my truck and I think it was under 30 bucks. I can't say how much the clutch will cost but will find out.
    Could he just make his current fan run engaged all the time? I have done it before and can't remember how. It was a temp. fix for a bad clutch over 10 years ago.
     
  17. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    On some of the older fans with a bi-metal spring,you could jam or bend the spring,but it was an unreliable fix.It would eventually let go and not work at all,leaving you on the side of the road overheated.
     
  18. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    One other reason electric fans don't work well on plow trucks is due to the increase electrical load they will put on the charging system.A big electric fan can pull 20-30 amps at full load.Dual fans would draw even more.Most plow trucks with electric plows have a hard enough time keeping the battery(s) charged with the lights,heater,wipers,etc going when plowing,that another 20-30 amps min would overwhelm the charging system.