1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Letter for dropping a customer?

Discussion in 'Business Fundamentals' started by TKLAWN, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. TKLAWN

    TKLAWN PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,576

    Wondering if anyone has a example of a letter to send a customer saying that you can no longer service them. We have two drive ways that kinda suck and are out of the way of our regular route. if anyone has any in put on how to keep it curtious and professional it would help me out.
     
  2. terrapro

    terrapro PlowSite Veteran
    from MI
    Messages: 3,874

    curtious and professional to me would be find someone to take them that you trust and know do a good job. maybe even trade for a couple accounts that might be out of their route. then call your customer and explain your position and tell them you have located a trusted business associate to take over for you if they are interested.

    one, you show you put forth effort to help them out one last time. two, you are building your business network by giving or trading work. hopefully a win win situation.
     
  3. redman6565

    redman6565 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,411

    just explain to them your situation. if you cant maintain the driveways then you dont or if you dont want to then dont. be polite and just tell them the truth.
     
  4. LoneCowboy

    LoneCowboy PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,760

    thank you for allowing us to be of service to you in the past years, however due to the increasing costs of doing business, we are no longer offering service to your area. You may wish to contact Mr Plow at 555-9876 as they do service this area and should be able to provide service to you. Again, thank you for your business and if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.


    and really do find someone who services the area (Mr Plow aka Homer would be fine)
     
  5. YardMedic

    YardMedic PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    I agree with the couple postings ahead of me. Sometimes doing the best thing for the customer is declining the work. If you have others you know who can do the work, make that effort or at the very least give the customer a couple names. Beyond that, being upfront with them is probably the right thing to do (although discretion is good when you WANT to say their driveway is a PITA!). Good luck!


    ~Kevin
     
  6. redman6565

    redman6565 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,411

    becareful though of recommending other people to do the work because if they do a terrible job then that doesnt make you look good when your recommeding them. they all have phone books and/or the internet, they can look up other plow companies. i wouldnt get involved in that.
     
  7. bribrius

    bribrius PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,609

    double what you charge and they will fire you.
    If they dont then now its worth it to you servicing them.
     
  8. JohnnyRoyale

    JohnnyRoyale 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,935

    What he said.:drinkup:
     
  9. MSS Mow

    MSS Mow Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 983

    As much fun as some of these suggestions would be, any other serious ones out there? I'm in need of dropping a couple of customer due to schedule/routes and way low prices but wanted to be as diplomatic as can be.
     
  10. Woodland

    Woodland Senior Member
    Messages: 269

    Actually, aside from the obvious sarcasm, there were some very good suggestions. What more are you looking for?
     
  11. ECS

    ECS Senior Member
    Messages: 485

    I ropped one this year, and two that I used to do, then sold and new owners called. Told them that I was downsizing and after last winter I no longer wanted to work 16 hr days. All 3 were fine with that and said they understand. I did give all of them a referal company like Cowboy mentioned.
     
  12. murray83

    murray83 Senior Member
    Messages: 420

    Possibly do a account trade with another plower? give him the ones you don't want for ones in your route area and everyone involved is happy
     
  13. MSS Mow

    MSS Mow Senior Member
    from Maine
    Messages: 983

    Yes, there were several good suggestions, but we all know we should keep it professional, etc. And offering them another contractor's name is out of the question. What I'm looking for, and I believe the original poster was looking for is actual sample letters of what others have used, not comments like "keep it professional". I saw one example of what someone used, but that centered around offering another contractor's contact info. I was just hoping for a few more samples. Even the snow and ice guide doesn't have a sample letter for dealing with this.
     
  14. TKLAWN

    TKLAWN PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,576

    Exactly what he said:)
     
  15. YardMedic

    YardMedic PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    Is a "sample letter" just something people are looking to copy, for us to do someone's dirty work? A short story here: back in the third grade, I would read a book for the purpose of doing a book report. I had no idea what to write. Instead of asking my mom to help me with the concept of how to do it, I somehow got her to write it. Where did it get me? I write, and I write well from practice and critique. How is anyone here going to handle simple correspondance if we write letters for him? Take the concepts shared here and mold them into your own letters. If a customer knows you, they will recognize your sincerity. I could care less about your customers, so me writing YOUR letter in terms of "take a hike, jacka$$" is about the message you're going to get in a canned form letter. I have no problem helping people with concepts, but maybe a professional letter could have been drafted many times over in the time spent squabbling over "where's my sample letter?" Of course, that's just my opinion... I could be wrong!
     
  16. Indy

    Indy Senior Member
    Messages: 704

    If you "recomend" another plow company........recomend 2 or 3............If you recomend one, and they suck, you recomended them!!!

    If you give the customer a choice and the next guy sucks, they made the decision on which one to use............., they can call one of the other 2 (that you where kind enough to provide) and work some thing better out........great and you can make contact with 3 other plowers to spread the word............
     
  17. murray83

    murray83 Senior Member
    Messages: 420

    Exactly,if you offer a few names of guys who plow in his area he would feel alot better and would make you seem more professional than a letter in his mailbox basically saying hey i'm dropping yah and leave him hanging and we all know people talk and word spreads around

    Its a dirty deed many of us hate to do but soften the blow a bit and give a good customer service image
     
  18. murray83

    murray83 Senior Member
    Messages: 420


    Very well said and a few times I've even met with customers to explain things out and I found they were very good about it and felt better that I took the time to meet with them and not a recieve a letter shoved in their mailbox,sometimes hearing your voice and seeing you in person is alot better than words typed on paper.
     
  19. bribrius

    bribrius PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,609

    I actually wanted to drop one last year but i couldnt find anyone else to plow it and i didnt want to leave them stranded so i just kept doing it. I asked them to look for someone else too and they didnt find anyone else either i guess????
    I had agreed to take it originally so i felt obligated to at least find a replacement rather than leaving them hanging. Finding someone else to take over never happened. I did up the price though.
     
  20. YardMedic

    YardMedic PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,266

    It's nice sometimes when you can continue what you feel is an obligation. However, when you've done everything you can, there's no harm in telling the customer you're increasing the cost because of how difficult the property is or how much farther you travel to service it. As mentioned earlier, increasing the price either makes it worth your while or makes the customer pursue other options. The increase is a simple letter as well, or a call or visit as was also mentioned as great options.