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Learning the ropes

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by skinut2234, Nov 9, 2005.

  1. skinut2234

    skinut2234 Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 57

    I think I asked this last year but I'll try again.
    Like I said now that I have the plow -I'd like to do some recreational plowing.
    I already will have one short road and a few driveways. I think I get the hang of it- but wondering how I go about learning how to use the plow as best I can?? Seems a little harder then I thought and I want to know what I am doing. Any websites or literature (or places) to look at to show me how to best do the job??
     
  2. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    First things first - What is "recreational plowing"?
     
  3. skinut2234

    skinut2234 Member
    from NJ
    Messages: 57

    recreational is probably a bad term
    I guess I meant it's not my main source of income but something I plan on doing if a bad storm falls on a weekend (or bad enough for me to take a day off)- Bought it to do my driveway and help a few older relatives who need help with their property)- Since I bought it- I've gotten a few offers to do some small jobs-
     
  4. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Ok, then. I'd say you're on the right track. Just take a few drives and avoid any contracts or commitments for now. Let people understand that you may not be able to make it exactly when they want - but you'll get there as best you can, whether that's before you go to work or after you get off. As far as I'm concerned, the best and only way to learn to plow is by getting out there and just do it. Then learn by your mistakes. People can say "Do this" and "Do that" but it's when you say "Oh, s---" that you actually learned something.

    For now, the best you can do is planning: Look the site over - plan how you're going to attack it, plan where you'll push snow, plan where you can pile and push the first ones back far enough to allow for future pushes. Put up markers at the entrances to driveways, mark any hazards (such as dropoffs or ditches), mark edges to grassy areas. Last year, I thought I'd marked this retaining wall pretty well, but still managed to tear one of the bidg stones out. I put it back in place and fortunately the owner never even realized it till I told him about it this Fall.
     
  5. SteveB(wi)

    SteveB(wi) Member
    Messages: 70

    As a "recreational" plower for 30+ years I find it enjoyable and a nice time out late at night in a storm, but tiring the next day at work. I do 8 drives -family and friends. I'm lucky in that I know the properties well and don't even have to think about what's where anymore. When your stacking the snow think about where the water is going to go when it melts. You don't want to create ice conditions. Not being in it for the money you can take your time a little more to not damage sod, your truck etc. Marking hazards is good, push back far enough early in the season but watch out if the ground isn't frozen yet or you'll rut things up. On my gravel drives I often have to hold the blade up the first couple times until things are good and frozen or you push a lot of gravel. There really is no substitute for windshield time to gain expierence.