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Large trailer mounted V-Box

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by chris9724, Jul 1, 2014.

  1. chris9724

    chris9724 Member
    from calgary
    Messages: 52

    Hey Guys

    I am thinking of building a large trailer mounted V-Box spreader.

    My starting point would be a 12' tri-axle flat deck trailer with gooseneck hitch.

    I would like to mount a 6 yard spreader to this trailer.

    I would be towing this with my f450 truck (the pickup style not a flat deck).

    I am currently running a 2.5 yard western tornado in my truck and overload it to 3yards. This is still not enough capacity for my route.

    I have looked into buying a f550 and putting a bigger spreader on that. But buy the time you take into account the weight of the deck and larger spreader. I don't get that much more payload then I have now. And I am not interested in any larger trucks because I still use this as my daily driver.

    The big question how has done this before and how well did it work. I have search the web and not found much info about this in North America. Seems to be a lot in Europe through.

    I would love to hear all you comments good and bad.

    Thanks Chris
     
  2. Whiffyspark

    Whiffyspark 2000 Club Member
    from SOMD
    Messages: 2,402

    As long as the trailer is high enough and rated okay you'll be fine. You can actually buy them. There was a post over the winter about them
     
  3. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    Go buy you a used SS Fertilizer/Lime Cart

    I know guy ran one for years his was tire driven chain and had a gas motor for the spinner
     
  4. fireball

    fireball PlowSite.com Veteran
    Messages: 536

    Just keep in mind that your fully loaded trailer will probably weigh more than your truck. If the trailer decides it wants to go somewhere, you will be going along for the ride. Making turns going downhill on a snowy surface will require a little forethought
     
  5. chris9724

    chris9724 Member
    from calgary
    Messages: 52

    I am fairly comfortable towing trailers in the winter. I've been towing an S330 bobcat for years. True that it defiantly takes some practise and thinking ahead. Just wondering if there are any major problems that I have not thought of with this type of set up.
     
  6. WIPensFan

    WIPensFan PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,496

    I've never seen one around my area...I've never seen one on this site...I'm guessing it's not a great idea. But, you could prove me wrong!

    Just seems like it would be so bulky and hard to maneuver around a parking lot. If the lot was big and wide open and always empty maybe.
     
  7. TCLA

    TCLA 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,699

    What's your plan with it when a salt run turns into a push? Or the next day after a push while salting your lots and you find the need to do touch up plowing here and there?

    Do you plan on applying salt only driving in forward? Gotta back down into truck wells. Gotta back into the important corners too. There are other situations that require you to go into reverse.

    Your truck and trailer will be horribly mismatched for the conditions you will be driving in.

    Does the pain of reloading (in order to finish your route because you say you don't have enough initial capacity to salt all of your sites in one load) outweigh the issues this trailer is going to give you?
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2014
  8. chris9724

    chris9724 Member
    from calgary
    Messages: 52

    You bring up some very good points. These are probably what are holding me back at this point. The maneuverability is the biggest issue.

    I do not plow much with this truck and once I start sanding all plowing opps are done.

    Things up this way are a little different. We do not use any salt (to cold) just 3/8 gravel chips. And we only spread these in drive lanes so this means far less backing up then one would think. But there are those dead end lots that I would have to back in or out of.

    I currently fill my truck 4 times to complete my route. I spend a lot of time driving back to the pile to fill.

    I am also concerned that I am over working my smaller spreader. 12 yards of gravel every run is a lot for it I think.

    Keep the comments coming.

    Thanks Chris
     
  9. Defcon 5

    Defcon 5 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,686





    Don't think its a real good idea....Towing 6 yards of whatever on snow coverd roads....No Thanks....But, heres a couple of pictures....:salute:

    th8MC0D4RE.jpg

    tractor-towed-salt-spreaders.jpg
     
  10. Defcon 5

    Defcon 5 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,686

    I think this one will do the trick.........:salute:

    D-Max-with-Blaster-350-front-mounted.png
     
  11. Whiffyspark

    Whiffyspark 2000 Club Member
    from SOMD
    Messages: 2,402

    I think he's a member on here
     
  12. framer1901

    framer1901 Senior Member
    Messages: 813

    That would definanetly be a goofy setup IMO, just from the manuverability and what if you had to plow standpoint.

    Going slightly goofy, might as well go all in with an old Agg spreader.

    One guy did it here in Holland one year, Agg spreader and slicing open bags to fill it - nice place to drive by when you were having a bad night, gave you a good laugh.

    Don't laugh at the spelling, spell check not working and it's the end of the day.
     
  13. Maclawnco

    Maclawnco Senior Member
    from OH
    Messages: 628

    Buy a cheap old cdl dump truck and be done with this decision. We have a couple and they make money hand over fist for us. Can load then till salt spills out and still be legal weight wise and very easy / safe to drive.
     
  14. Antlerart06

    Antlerart06 PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 3,437

    That would work back in the 80s used Lime spreader trucks Took the big tires off put smaller sets on
     
  15. chris9724

    chris9724 Member
    from calgary
    Messages: 52


    I wish I could do that. But up this way it gets way to cold to run older less reliable equipment. Even some of the new trucks have problems when it gets -40c out.

    In a perfect world I would just go buy a 33,000lb new hino truck. But there are a ton of bills that come with bigger trucks and I don't have much use for it in the summer.

    Still trying to wrap my head around this problem. I guess I should not call more sites a problem but I just at that point that I could use a big truck. I just don't want to pay for it. LOL.

    thanks Chris.
     
  16. mercer_me

    mercer_me PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,361

    Can you even buy a 6 yard spreader that runs on a gas engine or electric motor? Like others said, that's a lot of weight to be hauling behind an F-450.
     
  17. framer1901

    framer1901 Senior Member
    Messages: 813

    If you are doing 8 ton a nite, netting 75 bucks a ton and spreading 30 nights a year - you could buy a 14g dump truck, add a tailgate spreader for 4g and probably pay for the thing in two years.

    When you own a big truck, you'd be suprised what you find you can do with it.

    Yea it's cold up there, park the thing inside, it'll only run for a few hours at a time - although maybe that's not an option.

    I try and think of growth, what I do today will probably be bigger tomorrow, although you may be happy where you are at.

    Big trucks do generate big bills, but they also generate more work with less labor and effort.
     
  18. Maclawnco

    Maclawnco Senior Member
    from OH
    Messages: 628

    We bought 2 33k trucks for much less than 10k each. Both sit outside plugged in and start always, as cold as -20 this winter. Both earn about 1k an hour in the winter spreading. They sit all summer. Sometimes I drive them to the golf course just to blow the air horn and keep them fresh. The county is selling and few 4900s this fall. These same trucks went for $7500 each last fall.
     
  19. mercer_me

    mercer_me PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 6,361

    As long as you plug it in you will be fine leaving a big truck out side in the Winter. I plug my plow truck in the night before I know I need to use it and we have at least one truck plugged in all the time in case we have to spot sand.
     
  20. buildinon

    buildinon Senior Member
    Messages: 583

    We run the SnowEx SP7000 towable spreader on one of our trucks and it works great. The guy who runs it loves it to death. He was the first to have it in the Chicago area, and had some issues with it at first (motor design) but they fixed it, and the design since then. Due to the issues he was having. He likes the fact that the end of the day all he has to do is unhook and the spreader is off the truck. He is used to driving a semi, so he has no issues driving the truck with the spreader through the streets of Chicago, parking garages, alleys or anything else we plow. We also run a few agri-spreders as mentioned behind our end-loaders in lots that they run the push boxes on. That way we don't have to send a salt truck there, and they can do it all in one shot. Don't know how well those would work behind a truck on the road, but we have done it in a lot behind the loader in storms.