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Is Foam filling skidsteer tires worth it?

Discussion in 'Heavy Equipment' started by DirtyJerzey, Dec 3, 2012.

  1. DirtyJerzey

    DirtyJerzey Senior Member
    Messages: 358

    While at my local truck tire shop today getting a tire on one of our dumps changed, I was talking with one of the managers about servicing skid steer tires and getting a set of Snow Paws to try out... He suggested that we foam fill all of our skid tires. I know filling with foam would make them almost puncture resistant, but will it give any benefit for snow? I don't see how foam would give any benefit to pushing snow, unless Im mistaken. Our skids spend the majority of their time in the snow, not like were running them on construction sites etc...
     
  2. 2COR517

    2COR517 PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,115

    I think the foam adds weight too, but I'm not sure
     
  3. DirtyJerzey

    DirtyJerzey Senior Member
    Messages: 358

    From what Ive been able to find, 12x16 skid tire adds about 150lbs of weight at $175 do fill a tire, $1.40 per lb of extra weight.. I think I could find some scrap steel laying around to add 600lbs to each skid for cheaper then $700 or maybe for $1200 the Snow Paws would be better
     
  4. jhenderson9196

    jhenderson9196 Senior Member
    Messages: 615

    You'll get no flats, but you also loose traction. A foam filled tire is stiff. It doesn't conform to irregularities on the ground. It also rides rougher, if that's possible.
     
  5. ponyboy

    ponyboy Senior Member
    Messages: 957

    Your operator will hate you he will bounce all around
     
  6. Longae29

    Longae29 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,953

    This is very true.
     
  7. MatthewG

    MatthewG PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,390

    The skidsteer in my avatar has 4 filled tires, Id say they weigh at least 300 Lbs a tire, its a ton of extra strain the machine while turning, back, forth etc. Only benefit is I NEVER have to worry at 3 AM about a flat tire

    I probably wont do it again
     
  8. GSS LLC

    GSS LLC Senior Member
    Messages: 639

    It's horrible on the drive system. I wouldn't.
     
  9. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    My opinion is completely different from those above. I have nearly all my wheeled machines foam filled. I can't tell any loss of traction or strain on drive train.Mine are on pavement most of the time for snow and I cant really say its any rougher than air filled tires. Obviously it will be different off road. The extra weight probably aids in traction...but like someone said no flats. i looked at it this way..how much would a flat cost me in a snow storm ?
    Steve
     
  10. alldayrj

    alldayrj PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,096

    If youre prepared i will cost you 5 mins. I always keep a full set if plugs and i took a blown compressor and converted it to an airtank that i can bring with me if i need it. With a ratchet strap you're prepared for anything
     
  11. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    I don't know if you've ever had to re-bead a skid tire but it's never been a 5 minute job for ours. Those sidewalls do not want to bend in the cold. even using starting fluid it was nearly impossible to rebead one of our tires. Also what if it's tubed...then your screwed
    Steve
     
  12. jomama45

    jomama45 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,172

    Obviously, if he's carrying a plug set, the tires aren't tubed.

    I can't say I've ever had a flat plowing in the last 5 years or so with the skid, although I noticed a huge nail in a tire a few years back when I dropped it on site the first storm. I thought for sure it was going to screw me, but I actually completely forgot about it and had it repaired in April when I pulled the machine home. IMO, if you run good, thick rubber, flat tires aren't much of an issue at all, and if you're concerned, just keep a spare with you ready to go............
     
  13. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    I should have explained that we had a flat and tried to plug it only to find it was tubed..I couldn't rememeber which machine had what and couldn't tell from the stem. Either way replacing a flat or trying to plug and possibly rebead a skid tire in a storm is just not for me but i had to buck up about 190 per tire .
    Steve
     
  14. ducaticorse

    ducaticorse PlowSite.com Addict
    from we
    Messages: 1,426

    I bought a 753 demo machine with 1600 hours on it that looked like it had 5000. It had solid wheels on it, and cracks on all its stress points. If you are constantly on solid ground ie concrete, the wear and tear is higher than with air filled. BUT, with solid fill tires, you get no bounce, no rish of flats, and much higher stability due to the added ballast. The demo tires on my skid are roughly 275 a piece, and the air filled cant be more than 65-80. I lost a fair amount of counter weight/lift capacity when I switched.
     
  15. xtreem3d

    xtreem3d PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,548

    On my smaller 565 NH I was suprised at how much it could lift after the tires were filled..added bonus i guess
     
  16. ducaticorse

    ducaticorse PlowSite.com Addict
    from we
    Messages: 1,426

    Makes perfect sense. Add 450lbs to the rear, and you can lift more. It makes a big difference. All these machines are capable of lifting far more than their rated capacity.
     
  17. jomama45

    jomama45 PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,172

    I just bought a new set of 12-16.5's, and paid about $370 a tire, but they'll all but guarantee I won't get a flat. Even if I do get something in the tire that creates a slow leak, I should be able to notice it's low before it's off the bead.

    I guess my point is that dealing with a flat tire while plowing is extremely low on my "worry list", as in all the years of plowing, it hasn't happened, and as long as I keep decent tires on the machines in summer, they don't go off of the bead on construction sites either..........
     
  18. alldayrj

    alldayrj PlowSite.com Addict
    Messages: 1,096

    Mine arent tubed. Just plugged and patched to hell. I've gotten hit in the ss while plowing and it destroyed the rim. Once i got a new one i use the ratchet strap to put it back on. Never had much luck with the jesse james method.
    I do agree that i need to keep a spare. I've put rebar through the sidewall that needed 4 plugs before it stopped leaking, thought i lost a day of work there.
    I need a new set, almost 700 hrs on these. Looking into the solideals but its so attractive to use the 180 junk ones
     
  19. fordsuvparts

    fordsuvparts Senior Member
    Messages: 135

    Just have a few spares ready to go and you will never need them. When ever we don't have a spare tire to fit a machine or truck then it of course gets a flat tire, but if i have a spare it seems to never happen. I have a 1999 New Holland 665turbo that has 4000 hours and has plowed most winters of its life, and I only made the foam filled tire mistake one time ( reason I have 3 spares) . It was like drive a machine with demo tires and had terrible traction compared with an air filled tire. I usually lower the air pressure 10 pounds or so when plowing, it seems to help it grip better. As long as the operator isn't and idiot we have never had a problem with running lower air pressure.

    Don't waste your time with foam filled if all you do is plow, if your in the mud and rocks and doing demo jobs then go ahead.
     
  20. NICHOLS LANDSCA

    NICHOLS LANDSCA PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,310

    Once they are filled the tires are junk when they wear out, no recaping. You have to cut them off.