1. Welcome to PlowSite. Notice a fresh look and new features? It’s now easier to share photos and videos, find popular topics fast, and enjoy expanded user profiles. If you have any questions, click HELP at the top or bottom of any page, or send an email to help@plowsite.com. We welcome your feedback.

    Dismiss Notice

Is a Bobcat any good for plowing??

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by proplow, Jan 6, 2002.

  1. proplow

    proplow Junior Member
    from yahoo
    Messages: 9

    I have a hunting camp with a 3/4 mile long down hill dirt road in rough shape. I am wondering if a bobcat with a blade would push it effectively?

    And can a bobcat be fitted with chains?

    I could use this machine in the summer to work the trails and do maintainence so it would have a dual purpose. I noticed that the bobcats have little clearance and wonder if it would just get stuck?

    Pa Hunting camp!! THanks for your help in advance!
     
  2. lx665

    lx665 Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Becuase of the way a skid steer turns, chains tend to come off. I use a set of over the tire metal tracks and have had great results. For you're use I feel they would be the ticket. Don't use the tracks on pavement, they tend to mark it.
     
  3. proplow

    proplow Junior Member
    from yahoo
    Messages: 9

    bobcat!

    How expensive are the over the tire tracks?

    Proplow
     
  4. lx665

    lx665 Junior Member
    Messages: 11

    Mine were just over two thousand. I use my machine mostly for grading and trenching. It made my machine much more productive, so the cost was justified.
     
  5. Patbobcat

    Patbobcat Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    I think the bobcat makes a very versatile tool for your varied use. A bobcat should not get stuck as long as the blade is down and your moving the snow out of the way, however, you can still get hung up if you are in deep snow, just trying to drive through. Same as a truck. With the bobcat you have a great view of your plowblade, and great manueverability. I have metal tracks for mine, but take them off in winter so i can work on pavement. I don't feel that you should need them to move snow. A bobcat moves a little on the slow side, most I think around 5 mph, which might take a litle longer on a 3/4 mile stretch, but you have a more versatile machine.
     
  6. Highpoint

    Highpoint Senior Member
    Messages: 241

    No problem

    Proplow, Tire chains will work fine for what you will be doing.. The main key is to keep them tight on the tires using bungee cord on both sides and try not to do make quick turns. Take your time. Using a bucket will work well enough again for what you will be doing. Good luck:D
     
  7. proplow

    proplow Junior Member
    from yahoo
    Messages: 9

    I think you advise makes sense. I may rent one first and have it dropped at my road end after a good snow and fool around for a day to see it speed and traction. There is a rental yard that delivers only 10 minutes away.

    Thanks for the input. I think the regular bucket may be the way to go.

    Proplow
     
  8. Patbobcat

    Patbobcat Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    Proplow, here's a better idea. Go to a good bobcat dealer, tell them you are interested in buying a loader, but would like to try one first. My local dealer does free demos!
     
  9. Lockman

    Lockman Junior Member
    Messages: 15

    Hi prowplow I think that a skid wold be great for your road we plow and move snow with a 763h and have never gotten it stuck. We have a 6 foot blade thats mostly used for sidewalks but the cost of a new one may be prohibitive for home use . I have a small 1816 case skid for home use. looks like a toy but only cost a few thouand sure gets a workout around here .I have nt got mine stuck yet either but do have chains I put on the back tires. Biggest problem I can see is forward momentum pushing that far with a blade as said by pat bobcat speed really helps. If it was me I would use a bucket 7foot or so . much more versital. Dont stick just to bobcat in your search for one though lots of good used units out there. dealer service is a big issue out here in the sticks though. Parts can be expensive but are pretty easy to repair.
     
  10. BOSS Adam

    BOSS Adam Senior Member
    Messages: 122

    Proplow I think that the bobcat should work just fine for what your using it for good luck :D
     
  11. Gordon

    Gordon Junior Member
    Messages: 19

    Here is idea, how about a compact utility tractor?

    Just a thought
    Gordon
     
  12. Patbobcat

    Patbobcat Junior Member
    Messages: 7

    I think the compact 4x4 tractor would be great for plowing snow also. The bobcat is a better digging and grading machine in the summer months, especially when tracked! Also the bobcat is fairly easy to enclose and heat due to the existing R.O.P.S. If money were no object, I'd buy them all.:D
     
  13. TurfPlus

    TurfPlus Senior Member
    Messages: 179

    I used a 1920 NH compact 4x4 with loader for years. Its was mostly used for loading salt and stacking snow but it was under powered and slow. Switched to a NH LX885 and then NH LS180 2 speed (same machine). I have to say the skidsteer wins hands down. I agree with Pat....demo a skid and a compact. Most of my equipment dealers will give us a machine for a day.
     
  14. proplow

    proplow Junior Member
    from yahoo
    Messages: 9

    TurfPlus, what is a "compact" ? I think the advice on everything else is solid and I appreciate it.

    Dan
     
  15. Gordon

    Gordon Junior Member
    Messages: 19

    Guess I should have gone into a bit more detail. My compact is a L4310 Kubota 4wd hydro trans with loader and chains on the rear tires when needed. It will move some snow in winter and push dirt as well in summer. It's a good all around tractor for the jobs that I go after.

    I've also got a rearblade with a gauge wheel that does double duty. Works well for the gravel drives in summer months and doesn't gouge into the gravel of unfrozen drives in winter.

    But if you do decide to go with a skidsteer get the metal tracks. As you said it was a steep rough drive so you will need all of the traction that you can get.


    Gordon

    michelin xm27.jpg
     
  16. proplow

    proplow Junior Member
    from yahoo
    Messages: 9

    Gordon!

    Ok, now here is my question on a compact tractor.....

    I have experience on a bobcat, it is powerful, good in tight spots, turns on it's own axis, and has lots of attachments. It also would be safe yet real painful if it rolled down a mountain trail.

    I am thinking of using it to move snow, clear old skidder trails, prepare dirt and fix the drive as needed.

    A compact seems taller and more likely to roll? And kill me in the process if she ground loops! Three point hitch attachments require allot of back-up work in use and hookup? But attachments, and the tractors are much cheaper I beleive. I would think a tractor would be better for food plot work though. Does that bucket push snow alright? Do you drag the scraper at the same time as you use the bucket?

    For example they got 12" on the mountain this weekend, I would have to hike the heck up and plow down to open the road.

    ProPlow!
     
  17. 66Construction

    66Construction Senior Member
    Messages: 315

    I have the same machine TurfPlus has a New Holland LS180 2 speed. I just got it out in the snow for the first time and it had the power to move anything the truk can and more. You'll also be very safe inside even if you roll it. Heated cab also. Top speed is around 12 mph. Very versatile, you can go from plow to bucket to anything in a hurry.
    Casey
     
  18. proplow

    proplow Junior Member
    from yahoo
    Messages: 9

    Gordon, what does a Kubota with 4wd and a loader cost? Are they reliable as well?

    ProPlow
     
  19. Gordon

    Gordon Junior Member
    Messages: 19

    If you feel safe on a skidsteer then that is your best bet to go with. If you feel uneasy about any tractor you will be more likely to roll it than not and as it's been stated you have better protection for the roll that might happen. Wonder why that has been brought up a couple of times already --skidsteer=flip?

    Another question was price, you can pick up a used skidsteer cheaper than a used Kubota more than likely. Are Kubotas decent was a question. I think so, I've logged quite a few hours on them as well as other brands and had the least amout of problems with my kubotas.

    A skidsteer works best in a small area as it will turn quicker than a compact. But for the jobs you stated I would pick a tractor instead of a skidsteer hands down. I use the compact for some things and the skidsteer for others. Each unit has it's strong and weak points.

    The best advise so far was either demo one or rent one and see what you think for yourself. After all your the one going to be using it. Bottom line is---weight+traction=pushing power. More pushing power=job done faster and safer.

    Thats my two cents
    Gordon
     
  20. Lockman

    Lockman Junior Member
    Messages: 15

    As much as I like tractors old and new i'd still pick a skid loader .gorden is right. weight is the key and skids are way heavier than compacts. When I was in high school I worked at a rental store the second time our bobcat was rented the guy rolled it 100 feet down a fairly steep hill. wife found him hanging upside down a half hour later we tipped the machine back on its wheels checked the fluids and with the help of the very large wreckers winch cable drove it back up . Keep in mind though if you plan on using a skid loader for mowing a brush mower will cost a minimum of 4000 new and needs high flow hydraulics to run.