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I can't find a part anywhere

Discussion in 'Commercial Snow Removal' started by Joe92GT, May 2, 2003.

  1. Joe92GT

    Joe92GT Member
    Messages: 71

    I have the old style fisher plow on my truck, and bent the middle part of the plow frame where the springs are attached to.

    No one has this part on any diagrams, no shop can get me it.

    Anyone know where else I can try?

    thanks,

    Joe
     
  2. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Are you talking about the push beam under the truck ? Where the spring loaded pins are ? Any good dealer should be able to get you a push beam for your particular truck.

    Or something related to the trip springs ?
     
  3. Joe92GT

    Joe92GT Member
    Messages: 71

    Yeah it is the push beam. I found one guy, but he wanted 500 dollars.. I held back the comment I had for him.
     
  4. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    Ouch,that is pricey.I know way back they used to be 300.00 CDN.Now that you know what you need,try shopping around,or check with some of the online places.
     
  5. Mike 97 SS

    Mike 97 SS Banned
    from U.S.A.
    Messages: 1,106

    Joe, you are in NJ right? Did you give Shaws Garage a call? He is a Fisher snowplow dealer. 1-973-377-0421. They are located in Florham Park. Its run by husband and wife. Ask for Pete if you call. Mike :drinkup:
     
  6. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    A good metal shop could make one pretty easy. I have done it before to replace one. Probably a lot cheaper then $500.
     
  7. Jerre Heyer

    Jerre Heyer Senior Member
    Messages: 948

    Truck type would help. May have the one you need on the shelf used. $50-75 + shipping. Or try Ct's suggestion on having one made.

    When they bend it's usually because the bolts in the end are loose. A common occurance on the old style plows.

    Jerre
     
  8. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    Very true about loose bolts. Surprising because I knew some guys that used to loosen the bolts so that the push beam would "float" Often they ended up snapping the bolts off.
     
  9. wyldman

    wyldman Member
    Messages: 3,265

    I was told way,way back by a Fisher rep,that the push beam was considered the weak link,or failure point if you really whacked something.They were designed to bend.He also said the bolts should be loose,so it can float,as the Fisher center pivots are very tight.He recommended we never build our own,or repair\straighten\brace one,as it may not be the weak link anymore.Is this correct ?

    We had lots of the old Fishers,and Diamonds (same setup),and never had many failures except as intended when you really hit something.We used shouldered bolts,so they would float.Only thing we would do is drill the bolts out and use one size larger,so they bolts wouldn't shear,or wear through.It would be kinda funny to find out I've been doing it wrong for many years.
     
  10. Joe92GT

    Joe92GT Member
    Messages: 71

    Thats exactly what happend.. The nailed a man hole and broke the bolt. I repaird it, but the beam was twised enough not to hit the metal stop. So, after the rest of the season it got bent a lot.

    Truck is an 85 fullsize chevy. If you have one used, I'll gladly pay you for it.

    Thanks,

    Joe
     
  11. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Banned
    Messages: 2,133

    I still have some of the old installation manuals for the conventional plows. I have never seen one that advised leaving the bolts loose. All of them give torque specs.

    I have heard many people tell me the "float" story. Never seen support of it from a Fisher Manual. I know a lot of installers did leave them loose.

    The Pushbeam is considered the weak link in the Conventional Fisher. Although it has no failure points built in. I cannot see a problem rebuilding it to original specs.
     
  12. Jerre Heyer

    Jerre Heyer Senior Member
    Messages: 948

    Chris, Alot of the guys here put the bolts in to align the frame and push beam and then used the liquid bolt gun ( welder ) to complete the attachment. The "float" issue is a new one to me. You would think that the plow pins would do that as the pushbeam is in pockets with stops and very tight when new.

    The push beam is the weak link on the truck frame so I don't like the idea of welding it in solid but I do often use the larger bolt method as the holes get worn out. The problem there is clearance with the center rib on the push beam. Sometimes it requires the flattening of the bolt heads. By the way we install them with the nuts on the outside with hardened flat washers and locking nuts.

    Joe, I have several older cheve push beams on the shelf. Three measurements are needed. Spacing on the Ears of the plow. Usually 25"- This can be smaller for the lighter duty plows. The second is the overall length- Usually around 26" on the Cheve's, and the third is the end profile height and width where it goes into the side plates.
    The reason for the measurements is variety in the mounts. Most were common but there are others out there.


    Jerre
     
  13. Joe92GT

    Joe92GT Member
    Messages: 71

    Just got a chance to measure everything. The spacing of the plow ears is 25 inches center to center.

    Length of the push beam is ~26.5 inches. The hight is 2.5 inches, and the width is 4 inches.


    thanks,

    Joe
     
  14. Jerre Heyer

    Jerre Heyer Senior Member
    Messages: 948

    Joe, Give me a call with shipping info I've got one on the shelf that matches. Jerre
     
  15. Workhorse2500

    Workhorse2500 Junior Member
    Messages: 24

  16. Brian Simmons

    Brian Simmons PlowSite.com - Sponsor
    Messages: 196

    the bolts that hold the push beam to the plates are called castle nuts and bolts and they should be tight. These are considered a wear item. they are designed to stretch with use and be replaced when needed. they should be checked yearly and replaced if needed. these bolts are considered to be a mechanical fuse. and they are fairly cheap to replace.
     
  17. SIPLOWGUY

    SIPLOWGUY Senior Member
    Messages: 678

    I had a Fisher on my old Dodge. I found contacted Fisher ALWAYS gave me great results.