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How much will a 50lb bag cover?

Discussion in 'Ice Management' started by ChevKid03, Nov 12, 2009.

  1. ChevKid03

    ChevKid03 Senior Member
    Messages: 505

    Quick question guys. I am going to need to pick up a tailgate spreader this year and need to bid a few very small parking lots. Can someone here give me a rough idea and I mean very rough as to how much of an area a 50lb bag of salt/ice melt goes? It will be put down not light but not heavy either. Thanks for your help in advance!
     
  2. hydro_37

    hydro_37 PlowSite Veteran
    from iowa
    Messages: 3,790

    Do a "search" or read all the other posts about "coverage"
    It varies alot
     
  3. ChevKid03

    ChevKid03 Senior Member
    Messages: 505

    thanks. I was wondering what to type in the search.....
     
  4. ScottPA

    ScottPA Senior Member
    from PA
    Messages: 170

    An average of 750 Sqft...Got that info from SIMA..might be a good idea to join.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2009
  5. ChevKid03

    ChevKid03 Senior Member
    Messages: 505

    Thank you! Gonna check it out right now.
     
  6. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    :nod:

    That's a little heavy don't you think? That is almost 3000lbs an acre.

    Consider this: 300 lbs per lane mile (10' X 5280') of salt is generally accepted as the starting point in most situations. That is over an acre of surface area

    "The Park Maintenance Division of the U.S. Department of Interior considers the maximum safe application per season to be one-half pound of salt per square yard,"

    here is canada's handbook

    http://www.ec.gc.ca/nopp/roadsalt/cop/pdf/1774_EngBook_00.pdf

    Here are a couple of application tables

    http://www.clrp.cornell.edu/techassistance/CALIBRATION CHART.pdf

    http://knowledge.fhwa.dot.gov/cops/hcx.nsf/All+Documents/FEAE245FF1FDD25F85256FF60045520B/$FILE/salt%20application%20rate%20chart%20-%20MnDOT.pdf

    Here is a whole bunch of info on ice melts
    http://www.usroads.com/journals/p/rmj/9712/rm971202.htm


    http://www.meltsnow.com/state-of-the-salt0901.htm
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2009
  7. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    We can spread that much in one ice storm. :eek:
     
  8. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Yeah me too, :nod: but look at the state road tables, they are well below the earlier posters suggested 3K lbs @acre.
     
  9. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    Another fine example of bad math on plowsite.

    300# per lane mile is pretty light for a parking lot though.
     
  10. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Note I said starting point. It's a good rate for anti ice applications on daytime active roadways where the suns heat (it helps even if you can not see it) tire heat and friction help the cause. One of the things that the dual control electric spreaders have brought to the market, the ability to change application rates while spreading. Once I start spreading my hand rarely leaves the auger (material feed) control, feed rates change from practically nothing (-100 lbs@mile) at the bottom of a south face to heavy (7/800lbs@mile) on a tree covered north face hill.

    Check the application guides I enclosed they are very informative.
     
  11. Neige

    Neige Sponsor
    Messages: 2,197

    The smart about salt program states you only need 15 - 25 grams to melt 1 sq. yard of ice. (thats .033 to .055 pounds) thats just over 250 lbs per acre.
     
  12. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    At that rate 50lbs (the OP's question) will cover 8800 sq ft.
    an acre is approx 43,560 sq ft
    a mile of road (10' lane) is 52800sq ft
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2009
  13. JohnnyRoyale

    JohnnyRoyale 2000 Club Member
    Messages: 2,935

    And how do you feel about that statement Paul? You going to Get Smart About Salt this year??
     
  14. ScottPA

    ScottPA Senior Member
    from PA
    Messages: 170

    Hmm well I pulled that info right off SIMA site..

    "50# bag will cover an average of 750sq ft"

    but i just noticed thats the coverage for a walkway.
     
  15. WeDoSnowplowing

    WeDoSnowplowing Senior Member
    Messages: 160

    Depends how thick the customer want it. Wal Mart normal store lot about Western Poly hopper has 8 cu. ft. capacity
    12V DC motor mounted inside a sealed housing in the hopper for corrosion protection Powder coated steel auger and agitator
    Choose fixed-mount, dual swing-away mount or Class IV receiver hitch mount 3 times filling it for a light coat.

    <div style='width: 630px; height: 440px; background-image: url( http://vortex.accuweather.com/adcbin/netweather_v2/backgrounds/spring1_630x440_bg.jpg ); background-repeat: no-repeat; background-color: #607041;' ><div style='height: 420px;' ><script src='http://netweather.accuweather.com/adcbin/netweather_v2/netweatherV2.asp?partner=netweather&tStyle=normal&logo=1&zipcode=15857&lang=eng&size=14&theme=spring1&metric=0&target=_self'></script></div><div style='text-align: center; font-family: arial, helvetica, verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px; color: #FDEA11;' ><a style='color: #FDEA11' href='http://www.accuweather.com/us/PA/SAINT MARYS/15857/city-weather-forecast.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0' >Weather Forecast</a> | <a style='color: #FDEA11' href='http://www.accuweather.com/maps-satellite.asp' >Weather Maps</a> | <a style='color: #FDEA11' href='http://www.accuweather.com/index-radar.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&zipcode=15857' >Weather Radar</a> | <a style='color: #FDEA11' href='http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/index.asp' >Hurricane Center</a></div></div>
     
  16. Wayne Volz

    Wayne Volz Senior Member
    Messages: 694

    Variables in the event make the science of spreading difficult.

    This debate can and will go forever.

    Recipe for success = Look at the label of the product you are spreading, add experience from your gut, look at the current conditions that you are making the application in, and there is the right answer.

    Day or night, traffic flow or not, temperature, moisture content of the snow, and many more variables are all contributing factors to your rate of application. That's what makes our industry so exciting. Science is applicable and a great starting point for rates of applications, but storm variables and our own experience gets us to what we think is the right rate. Reality is how many of us are using calibrated equipment that tells us the exact amount applied to the areas being treated? Answer - Very few of us.
     
  17. ScottPA

    ScottPA Senior Member
    from PA
    Messages: 170

    Spoken like a true entrepreneur.
     
  18. Neige

    Neige Sponsor
    Messages: 2,197

    Im working on it, flew down this spring to take the course. It was interesting, I really like the idea. On an enviromental standpoint its great.
     
  19. cretebaby

    cretebaby PlowSite Veteran
    Messages: 4,162

    eh?????????????????
     
  20. basher

    basher PlowSite Fanatic
    from 19707
    Messages: 8,992

    Those using commercially manufactured liquid applicators all have good calibration. Those running dual control units can quickly learn volume association and control material feed rates. I use a 5 gallon bucket to time volume/time calculations. Saltdogg spreaders are cap0able of moving as much as 2.2 cubic feet per minute meaning at full speed with the gates wide open you will discharge a yard (2000lbs) of material every 12.272 minutes. With today's digital controls, some simple math, an understanding of the equipment and a little experimentation you can do a good job of applying specific volumes.
    Even those with simple hitch mount tail gate an control application rates though load procedures. If a lot requires 250 lbs per application that's all you put in the hopper and control your spread rate to make it cover the entire area.