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How much salt in 1 ton?

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself to the Community' started by Rogerplows, Sep 12, 2005.

  1. Rogerplows

    Rogerplows Junior Member
    Messages: 26

    How much space does one ton of rock salt take up actually? Obviously it depends on how often you use it, but how long should a ton of salt last say using it twice a week to salt regular size driveways and small 100x100 ft lots (about 3 of them)?
     
  2. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    A yard (3'x3'x3' or 27 sq ft) of course salt weighs about 1350 pounds. A yard of fine salt weighs about 2025 pounds.

    How much you use will depend on many factors, especially of the snow & ice. For a light covering using a sand/salt mix, I figure 1/2 ton for one mile of 12' wide road (63,360 sq ft).

    Not sure what your "regular sized driveway" is. Mine is about 300' long and 15' wide.
     
  3. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,034

    Hey Mick, I thought for sure you would've said 2000#. ;) :D

    Roger, for the bulk salt we get with the amount of moisture we figure 1 yard is about 1 ton.
     
  4. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Usually I would and I actually figure 1 yard to 1 ton. But I remembered those numbers from several years ago, so I went and looked them up. Just bored, today.
     
  5. Rogerplows

    Rogerplows Junior Member
    Messages: 26

    One yard is one ton? OK, for a simpleton here, is that one cubic yard per ton, which would be about 9ft by 9ft in area, so many feet high?
     
  6. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,034

    One cubic yard is 3X3X3= 27 cubic ft.

    Mick's figures are more accurate, but I use the 1 yard = 1 ton, so far has worked for us. Sometimes our salt is lighter--less moisture--sometimes it almost has water running out of it--lots of moisture, so it pretty much averages out in the end.
     
  7. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    A cube has three measurements - A cubic yard is 3' (ie one "yard") x 3' x3' = 27 sq ft. Yes, one ton per cu yd.

    And Mark, it finally sank in my thick head that you were making a joke yesterday that you were sure I'd say there was 2,000# of salt in a ton.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2005
  8. Rogerplows

    Rogerplows Junior Member
    Messages: 26

    So 27 square ft is not much at all. If we have two stailgate spreaders that hold 10.2 sq ft each, we'd only be able to fill them once and a third each time per ton. Does that sound about right? This is first year salting and it looks like we're gonna go through quit a good amount of salt based on these figures and the predicted amount of snow. Thank you all who responded. I'm new in here and really appreciate this valuable info being a newbie.
     
  9. snowtime

    snowtime Junior Member
    from Ohio
    Messages: 25

    If your measuring your salt in tons than you shouldn't be using a tailgate spreader. You need a V-Box or Salt-Dog or something like that.

    I was originally looking at a Meyer Mate, but the Buyers spreader caught my eye. You should be able to find it on the web easy enough.
     
  10. Rogerplows

    Rogerplows Junior Member
    Messages: 26

    The tailgate spreaders are already on the trucks, bought and paid for. The boss would not listen to me and did not get the v-box spreader that I thought we needed. We'll just have to shovel, shovel and shovel some more into the smaller spreaders. For moderate to light use, does anyone think 3 tonswill suffice or perhaps more than that? Obviously it depends on how much snow and what not. I'm looking for a good ballpark guess here.
     
  11. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    You've told us you have three lots of 100'x100' (total area 30,000 sq ft), but how many total square feet are in the driveways?
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2005
  12. Rogerplows

    Rogerplows Junior Member
    Messages: 26

    It's actually 6 lots @ 100x100 and 1 at 200 (length of building)x50 locked in, with bids out (probably landing) on more and the driveways are approx. 20ftx40ft, 20ftx20ft, 15ftx40ft and 100ftx20ft. Does that help?
     
  13. plowed

    plowed Senior Member
    Messages: 344


    No, it's not 27 square feet in a cubic yard, it's 27 cubic feet. Big difference.
     
  14. hickslawns

    hickslawns Senior Member
    Messages: 613

    For what it sounds you are doing, it would be simpler to buy bagged salt. You can load a full skid, or partial skid for that matter and not shovel. Easier to figure for billing if billing per pound. It stores up easier, and keeps a lot of the moisture out. Our skids of 80 pound bags hold 30 bags, or 2400 pounds. Your boss can buy 4-5 pallets, and see how it goes. If he still thinks you need bulk, then you can pay for the minimum load.
     
  15. Mick

    Mick PlowSite.com Veteran
    from Maine
    Messages: 5,546

    Yes, thank you. I'm getting lot total area of 70,000 sq ft and driveway total area of 3,800 sq ft. So, total area of 73,800 sq ft. One acre = 43560 sq ft. So, your total area is 1.69 acre. This is the best way to figure what you'll need for various scenarios. For a light coating of salt, I'd estimate 1/4 - 1/3 of a yard (or ton :drinkup: ) per acre. So, to estimate safe, say 2/3 yard for that total area.
     
  16. cet

    cet PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 7,190

    If you are using 2 trucks to salt these areas then you would be fine with the tailgate salters. At most it is 1000lbs per salter. Bag salt is easier to use then bulk but twice the price. 12 large bags per truck should be enough to do the job. Just make sure you don't leave any salt in the salter after you are finished for the day. A V box salter will cut down on your vision and usually increase your plowing time.
     
  17. Question for you Mark

    Where do you buy salt in Grand Rapids, I called Blenco (the fertalizer place in Marne) but all they have is a professional ice melter that is $8.67 per 50lb bag and I know that is expensive. Thanks
     
  18. One more question

    O yeah, I forgot to ask, do you charge per pound or per second? And how much for each. THanks
     
  19. Mark Oomkes

    Mark Oomkes PlowSite Fanatic
    Messages: 10,034

    Try Chulski's, they are in Marne as well. Just up the street from Blenco. They have a bunch of different types of salt, blends, etc. MTO in Hudsonville has some different varieties as well.

    We charge by the ton, we only use bagged product on sidewalks. Like I've said in a couple other threads, you need to determine your costs and figure the price you need to charge to cover those costs and make the profit you want. Our companies are different, with different equipment, different overhead, and different labor burdens and possibly different target market. I'm not sure who exactly you are, either, and I am not going to tell somebody in my market what my pricing is. So I could tell you what we are charging, but you might lose money or price yourself out of your market. You need to determine your pricing.

    I don't intend to sound rude or arrogant, please don't take it that way, but I would tell anybody in any market the exact same thing.
     
  20. k

    thats totally and completely fine. I understand. I am and single owner/operator that just recently started in the NW side